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Visible Hands in Economics

group photo of VHE students

What is the VHE program?

The VHE Program (Visible Hands in Economics) was introduced in 2018/19 and is designed to create a welcoming, inclusive environment in introductory economics. The program is responsible for many of the traditional TA roles, including hosting section-specific clinics and grading. In addition to section-specific clinics, the VHEs host a weekly study-hall open to all students in introductory economics.

VHE study halls create a space for students to work on problem sets, solidify economic concepts, and meet with other students interested in economic issues. Four VHEs are in attendance at each study hall to help introduce students to the discipline, including working with students on course content and sharing ideas and strategies for getting the most out of introductory economics. 

Section Professor VHE Day Time Location
1 & 2 Caskey Jack Cote & Jessica Li Sunday   Kohlberg 226
3 Magenheim Vanessa Jimenez-Read Tuesday    
4 He Emma Tapp      
Study-Hall All Lauren Knudson, Mirayda Martinez, Chase Williamson, & Deante Bryan Wednesday 8-10 pm Kohlberg 116

 

Spring 2019 VHEs

Lauren Knudson

Name: Lauren Knudson (Student Coordinator)
Graduation year: 2019
Majors(s)/minor(s): Double major in economics and political science.
Economics Courses Taken: Introduction to Economics (001); Intermediate Microeconomics (011); Intermediate Macroeconomics (021); Financial Economics (022); Introduction to Econometrics (031); Health Economics (075); Environmental Economics (076); Research Seminar: Public Policy (091C); Economics of European Integration (abroad).
Interesting fact: I have been to over 70 University of Iowa football games..
What is your favorite thing about economics: I love how economics combines quantitative and qualitative analysis to find realistic and innovative solutions to important problems facing society.

Mirayda Martinez

Name: Mirayda Martinez
Graduation year: 2020
Majors(s)/minor(s): Double major in economics and computer science.
Economics Courses Taken: Introduction to Economics (001); Intermediate Micro (011); Intermediate Macro (021);Economic Poverty & Inequality (015); Financial Accounting (033); Economic Development (081).
Interesting fact: I can touch my nose with my tongue!
What is your favorite thing about economics: My favorite thing about the Economics department are the professors; they truly want to see their students succeed and will go the distance to make sure that you're fully understanding the material.

Chase Williamson

Name: Chase Williamson
Graduation year: 2019
Majors(s)/minor(s): Honors major in economics, course major and honors minor in math.
Economics Courses Taken: Introduction to Economics (001); Intermediate Micro (011); Intermediate Macro (021); Intro Econometrics (31); Advanced Econometrics (35); Advanced Macro (102); Advanced Econometrics (135); International Economics (151); Economic Development (181).
Interesting fact: I have a dog named Wallace who weighs more than I do!
What is your favorite thing about economics: Economists actively engage with some of society's most pressing problems; studying everything from climate change to the opioid crisis.

Deante Bryan

Name: Deante Bryan
Graduation year: 2020
Majors(s)/minor(s): Political science major.
Economics Courses Taken: Intro to Economics (001); Intermediate Micro (011); Financial Accounting (033); Global Capitalism (045); Economic Development (081).
Interesting fact: I was born in Jamaica.
What is your favorite thing about economics: I like economics because it gives me a lens for understanding current affairs.

Vanessa Jimenez-Read

Name: Vanessa Jimenez-Read
Graduation year: 2020
Majors(s)/minor(s): Double major in economics and Latin American & Latino Studies.
Economics Courses Taken: Intro to Economics (001); Intermediate Micro (011); Intermediate Macro (021); Intro to Econometrics (031); Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in Economics (073).
Interesting fact: I'm from Jacksonville, Florida but I was born in Cayey, Puerto Rico.
What is your favorite thing about economics: Opportunity to learn about labor markets and discrimination within different markets.

Jeff Tse

Name: Jeff Tse
Graduation year: 2019
Majors(s)/minor(s): Honors major in economics and honors minor/course major in math.
Economics Courses Taken: Creativity and Economics (009); Intermediate Micro (011); Intermediate Macro (021); Intro to Econometrics (031), Operations Research (032); Financial Accounting (033); Intermediate Econometrics (035); Health Economics (075); Advanced Macroeconomics (102); Advanced Econometrics (135); Antitrust and Market Regulation (162).
Interesting fact: I am on the swim team.
What is your favorite thing about economics: How econ can be used to explain everyday behavior

Jessica Li

Name: Jessica Li
Graduation year: 2019
Majors(s)/minor(s): Philosophy major and economics minor.
Economics Courses Taken: Intro to Economics (001), Intermediate Microeconomics (011) Introduction to Econometrics (031).
Interesting fact:
What is your favorite thing about economics: My favorite thing about Economics, as a field, is the precision with which it can think about difficult and pressing questions. My favorite thing about the Economics Department at Swarthmore are the professors! They are invested in your success and, in my experience, very patient, even if you don't understand the material on your second or third attempt.

Jack Cote

Name: Jack Cote
Graduation year: 2020
Major(s)/Minor(s): Honors major in economics, political science (honors) and computer science (course) minors.                                                                                                      Economics Courses Taken: Intro to Economics (001); Intermediate Micro (011); Intermediate Macro (021);  Introduction to Econometrics (031); Behavioral Economics (055); Advanced Microeconomic (101); Economic Development (181).
Interesting fact: I play ultimate frisbee on the Swarthmore Earthworms.
What is your favorite thing about economics: I'm very interested in public policy, incentives, and what motivates human decision-making. I came into Swarthmore as an intended political science major, but found that the models and intuitive takeaways of economics have been more useful to understanding these problems.