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Luciano Martínez

Associate Professor and Department Chair

Department of Spanish

Contact

  1. Email:lmartin1@swarthmore.edu
  2. Phone: (610) 328-8016
  3. Kohlberg 343
Photo of Luciano Martinez

Born in Tandil, Argentina, Luciano Martínez received the degree of Profesor de Castellano y Literatura from the Instituto San José in his hometown, and completed that of Profesor en Letras at the National University of Mar del Plata, for which he received the dean's Award for Outstanding Graduate. Then he obtained his Licenciatura en Letras and, once again, was given the dean's Award for Outstanding Graduate. He was honored with the Academia Argentina de Letras award, given to the year's most outstanding graduate in literature in the country.

Specializing in Latin American Literature, Professor Martínez received his M.A. and his Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh, where he was awarded an Andrew Mellon Fellowship to write his dissertation. Wishing to work beyond the confines of existing disciplines, he pursued a Doctoral Certificate in Cultural Studies from Pitt's Cultural Studies Program, the oldest and most interdisciplinary such program in the United States. In addition, he obtained a Certificate of Advanced Study in Latin American Studies.

His book, Miguel Briante, genealogía de un olvido (2001), was widely reviewed in Spain, Argentina and the United States. He has published articles on Jorge Luis Borges, Héctor Tizón, César Vallejo and Latin American gay literature.

At Swarthmore, Professor Martínez teaches courses on contemporary Latin American literature and cultural studies, focusing on topics such as the politics and aesthetics of Boom and Post-Boom writers, literature and film adaptations, literary criticism and critical theory through Jorge Luis Borges, and 21st century LGBT literature and queer theory.

Luciano Martínez served as the chair of the Latin American Studies program, the Gender and Sexuality Studies program, and the Spanish section head of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures. 

Professor Martínez's current research interests center on new forms of representation and interpretation at play in a set of queer issues emerging on recent Latin American literature and cinema. He is the editor of the first special issue Revista Iberoamericana on gay and lesbian studies and queer theory, which brings together the most current theoretical perspectives from Latin American, European and American scholars. His next book project deals with an aspect unexplored in both the field of history and that of literary studies: the relationship between two groups that offered resistance to the authoritarian Latin American governments of the seventies, the activists of the revolutionary left, convinced of the necessity of an armed fight, and the homosexuals, committed to the cause of sexual liberation.