Machu Picchu, Peru

 

Spanish, the second national language of the United States, is the official language of twenty countries—spoken by close to 500 million people in the world. A living and migrating language with a long history, it bears the imprint of the peoples who crafted it: Celts, Iberians, Romans, Visigoths, Jews, Arabs, and many of the original inhabitants of the Americas. Spanish is also the gateway to one of the most vital and heterogeneous literatures and cultures in the world.

Our program incorporates a broad range of themes, texts and geographic areas to fulfill a wide variety of needs and interests. While we pay close attention to the canonical texts that have shaped a certain understanding of Iberian and Latin American literatures, we also explore the marginal voices and texts that challenge our preconceived notions. We cross the boundaries of literature, incorporating films and documentaries as we consider new critical methods and reading practices.

The Spanish Program has something to offer everyone. It provides a strong foundation for graduate studies in Spanish and Latin American literatures. Our students pursue careers in a wide range of disciplines. Whether you are planning to be an engineer, biologist, historian, or political scientist, the study of Spanish language and its cultures will open your mind to new perspectives.