Old Quiver, New Arrows

"I think every book of poems tells a story," says Professor Nathalie Anderson. Here, she reads from Quiver, her latest collection. More

Medievalist Writes Riddles for Hollywood

Professor Craig Williamson conjured a batch of riddles to promote The Hobbit movie More

Becoming South Asian in America

Associate Professor Bakirathi Mani explores how South Asians create new definitions of Asian American identity and community. More

SPRING 2015 COURSES

U.S. Fiction, 1945 to the Present

It’s an old American story:  re-invent yourself on the run, without time to think about the consequences or even what you’re running from and why.  And yet the past keeps turning up, like your own shadow.  What then?  Whom do you turn to?—for you can’t get where you’re going on your own.  That’s where the real story begins.  

From Milton to modern poetry, from Anglo-Saxon to African American texts, our purpose is to teach literature energetically and imaginatively and to inspire students to read deeply, think and argue cogently, and write convincingly.

Overall, we are guided by the conviction that men and women who can read with insight and write with craft and power can master the fundamentals of new disciplines.

Whatever the classroom subject -- from the details of a Shakespearean sonnet to the drama of Sam Shepard, from the fine-tuning of an argument on Beloved to a feminist critique of Milton -- we hope to nurture imaginative reading, insightful analysis, cogent argument, and compelling prose.

This is a joint effort; we would, in the fashion of Chaucer's Clerk, "gladly lerne ... and gladly teche."