Educational Studies

K. ANN RENNINGER, Professor 3
LISA SMULYAN, Professor and Chair
DIANE DOWNER ANDERSON, Associate Professor
CHERYL JONES-WALKER, Assistant Professor 1
EDWIN MAYORGA, Instructor
ELAINE ALLARD, Visiting Assistant Professor
JENNIFER BRADLEY, Visiting Assistant Professor (part time)
ELAINE BRENNEMAN, Visiting Assistant Professor (part time)
MARGARET INMAN LINN, Visiting Assistant Professor (part time)
KAE KALWAIC, Administrative Assistant
CATHERINE DUNN, Placement and Clearance Coordinator

 

1 Absent on leave, fall 2014.
3 Absent on leave 2014–2015.

 

The Educational Studies Department at Swarthmore engages students in the investigation of educational theory, policy, research and practice from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. We prepare students to work in educational research or policy, to enter the teaching profession, and/or to pursue graduate study in educational studies or a related field. The department encourages undergraduates to think critically and creatively about the processes of teaching and learning and about the place of education in society. The department is also committed to preparing students to address education-related needs in an era of rapidly increasing racial, ethnic and linguistic diversity and technological change to develop students’ abilities to participate fully in civic, cultural and economic arenas. Both introductory and upper level courses in the department draw on theory and research in anthropology, economics, history, political science, psychology and sociology.

The Academic Program

Students interested in educational studies at Swarthmore may design an honors or course special major in educational studies and another discipline or an honors or course minor in educational studies. Students also have the option to pursue teacher certification.

Course Special Major

In special majors involving educational studies the student combines work in educational studies with work in another academic department or interdisciplinary program. Pre-established programs have been created with the following disciplines: biology, chemistry, English literature, French, German, history, linguistics, mathematics/statistics, music, physics, political science, psychology, Russian, sociology/anthropology, and Spanish. Special majors with other disciplines can be pursued with the approval of both the Educational Studies Department and the second department. In the case of all special majors involving educational studies, both departments collaborate in advising the student.

The special major usually requires 10 to 12 credits, at least 5 of which must be in educational studies. All special majors are required to complete a thesis or a comprehensive examination integrating work in their two fields of study. Special majors are encouraged to take EDUC 065 Educational Research for Social Change in the spring of their sophomore or junior year. This course, which can be taken for 0.5 or 1 credit, prepares students to write a special major thesis in their senior year. Each partnering department or program provides specific course requirements for the completion of a special major and for the thesis/comprehensive exam, details of which may be found on the departmental website.

If special majors pursue teaching certification, EDUC 092: Curriculum and Methods Seminar and EDUC 093: Practice Teaching are not counted as part of a special major requirements. The prerequisite for acceptance to the special major program is successful completion of EDUC 014: Introduction to Education and one other course in the department.

Course Minor

The educational studies minor provides students with the opportunity to choose from a variety of educational studies courses and prompts students to reflect on the overarching theme of their experience in the department. The educational studies minor requires at least 5 credits in educational studies. Students identify a focus when they apply for the minor and then explain how their coursework supports this focus. Possible foci include but are not limited to Teaching and Practice, Educational Policy, Educational Psychology, School and Society, Urban Education, Environmental Education, and Literacy. The prerequisite for acceptance to the educational studies minor program is EDUC 014: Introduction to Education. Minors may also pursue teacher certification.

Honors Program

The department supports the Honors Program for special majors and minors.

Honors Special Majors

Students may opt to pursue an Honors Special major in educational studies and another department or interdisciplinary program. Pre-established special majors have been created with the following disciplines: English, linguistics, political science, psychology and sociology/anthropology. Honors special majors with other disciplines can be pursued with the approval of both educational studies and the partnering department. The Honors special major, like the Course special major, requires a total of 10 to 12 credits, at least 5 of which must be in educational studies. However, Honors special majors must also include 4 Honors preparations in their program. These must be distributed as follows:

  • 3 (2 credit) Honors preparations, normally completed by taking Honors seminars, at least 1 or 2 of which must be in educational studies.
    • It is possible to complete a one-credit educational studies course with another one-credit educational studies attachment as 1 Honors preparation. Availability of this option is limited and designed with a supervising educational studies faculty member.
  • 1 Honors preparation through the completion of a double-credit thesis. This thesis normally serves to integrate the fields of the special major and is supervised by faculty members in both departments of the special major. Honors special majors are encouraged to take EDUC 065 Educational Research for Social Change in the spring of their sophomore or junior year. This course, which can be taken for 0.5 or 1 credit, prepares students to write the special major thesis in their senior year.

Each partnering department also provides specific course requirements for the completion of a Honors special major, which may be found on the departmental website. Students are expected to have a B+ average in their educational studies courses to complete an Honors special major. Additionally, students must complete external examinations upon completion of the program. The prerequisite for acceptance to the Honors Educational Studies Major Program is EDUC 014: Introduction to Education, 2 additional educational studies courses of the student’s choice, and an average grade of B+ in all educational studies courses at the time of application. Honors majors may also pursue teacher certification.

Honors Minors

Students may opt to pursue an Honors minor in educational studies. The Honors minor requires five credits in educational studies, including EDUC 014: Introduction to Education (1 credit), one Honors seminar (2 credits), and two additional credits of the student’s choice. Students are expected to have a B+ average in their educational studies courses and to complete the external Honors examination. The prerequisite for acceptance to the Honors educational studies minor program is EDUC 014: Introduction to Education. Honors minors may also pursue teacher certification.

Additional Honors Program Details

External Examinations

As part of the Honors Program, students complete an examination for each completed preparation. The thesis preparation for Honors special major students involves a 45–60-minute individual oral exam on their work with an outside examiner. Examination for Honors preparations other than the thesis includes a written and an oral component. The written portion of the exam is set by an external examiner who writes exam questions based on seminar syllabi. The exam may include a problem set, a case and/or additional readings relevant to the work students have undertaken in that preparation. These materials may be sent to the student in advance of the written exam. All educational studies honors exams are written in the Educational Materials Center. A maximum of 5 hours is allowed for completion of each exam.

Intellectual Autobiography

All Honors students (special majors and minors) in educational studies write a short intellectual autobiography that is sent to the Honors examiner. Students may also choose to send to the examiner a paper from an Honors seminar. The autobiography and the paper are not formally evaluated by the examiner; they are intended to familiarize the examiner with the student’s experience and background in educational studies, since each student in each seminar brings different disciplinary content to his/her understanding of the material. The autobiography is written in the spring of the senior year under the supervision of the department chair in educational studies.

Sophomore Plan Application Process

Students interested in pursuing a special major or minor through the department are encouraged to discuss their interests and plans with faculty members. The department’s website may also be helpful. Faculty will advise and assist students as they explore the multiple options available to them.

In order to complete the Sophomore Plan, students will:

  • Arrange a meeting with the chair of the department to discuss their educational studies interests and how they might complete the necessary requirements during the remainder of their Swarthmore career.
  • Write a Sophomore Plan and submit it to the department in conjunction with specifications provided by the Dean’s Office at www.swarthmore.edu/student-life/academic-advising-and-support/sophomore-....

Pathways to Teaching

Swarthmore students come to an interest in teaching at many points during their own educational careers—some before they enter college, others during their four undergraduate years, and some as they investigate possible careers after Swarthmore. Students are encouraged to explore the many opportunities available to them in the field of education. Pathways to Teaching, on the department’s website, offers students more information on the options available to them:

  • Mentoring and tutoring opportunities offered through Swarthmore.
  • Summer opportunities to work in classrooms or enrichment programs or complete an education-related internship.
  • Teacher certification at Swarthmore.
  • Graduate study in education, including teaching programs and other programs in educational studies.
  • Post-graduation teaching/education job opportunities and resources (for all students—with or without certification)

Research Opportunities and Experiences

Engaging in research is integral to students’ work in educational studies. Participation in research supports students to understand the importance of research to theory, policy-making, and practice.

In each course and seminar in the department, students are introduced to qualitative and/or quantitative methods of research, which they use to work directly with questions addressed in coursework. Students not only read original research, but they also collect and analyze data using appropriate methods in each course.

Students are strongly encouraged to take EDUC 065: Educational Research for Social Change in the spring of their sophomore or junior year. This course, which can be taken for 0.5 or 1 credit, prepares students to write a special major thesis in their senior year.

As a culminating activity in the department, most special majors write a thesis. Students select the focus of their thesis work; theses typically build on students’ course work and methods training in educational studies and the other department comprising their special major.

Some students conduct independent research or serve as research assistants on faculty members’ projects. Students may begin working as research assistants as early as the summer following their first year. Many such collaborations have led to student-faculty co-authored conference presentations, articles, and chapters.

Fieldwork and Service-Learning Opportunities

Bridging research and practice is a goal for courses and seminars in the department. Many courses and seminars have a distinctive field work component. Course descriptions indicate if a course involves a field placement.

Depending on transportation options, students can request fieldwork placements in urban, suburban, or rural communities and choose from public, charter, or private school settings. Students are encouraged to use the field placements as an opportunity to explore a range of school and population types. A list of school sites may be found on the department’s website. In addition, EDUC 070: Community Outreach Practicum is a course designed for students working in out-of-school educational and community-based settings.

Study Abroad

Students requesting credit in educational studies for course or field work done abroad (or at another institution in the U.S.) must take EDUC 014: Introduction to Education. This course may be taken before or after the study abroad credit is completed, but the credit will only be accepted after Introduction to Education has been completed.

Two study abroad programs with developed educational studies components include:

The Cloud Forest School Program, Costa Rica

Through this program, students complete a school-based internship and receive an intercultural credit for Spanish language learning. See http://www.swarthmore.edu/academics/educational-studies/academic-program... more information.

Globalization and the Environment, University of Capetown, South Africa

This program focuses on both environmental and educational issues such as literacy, equity, intersections between schools, communities, and the environment in South Africa. See http://www.swarthmore.edu/academics/educational-studies/academic-program/off-campus-study/globalization-and-the-environment-program.xml for more information.

Transfer Credit

Transfer credit is accepted once a student has completed EDUC 014: Introduction to Education. To request transfer credit, the student must present a syllabus and all course work for the department to review. Some additional work may be required.

Teacher Certification

Swarthmore offers a competency-based teacher preparation program for both special majors and minors (Honors or Course). Certification for elementary, middle and/or high school teaching is transferable to all 50 states; after PA certification, some states may require additional exams or content. A guide to certification reciprocity is available through Certification Map at http://certificationmap.com/states/reciprocity-disclaimer/.

Swarthmore’s programs for secondary certification are designed with guidance from faculty members in the discipline in which the student is being certified as well as members of the Educational Studies Department. Students preparing for elementary certification design their course of study with advisement from the Swarthmore Educational Studies Department and Eastern University.

Formal admission to the teacher certification program occurs at the start of EDUC 092: Curriculum and Methods and EDUC 093: Practice Teaching after students have successfully completed their core educational studies and discipline major requirements. Students must have completed 12 Swarthmore College credits (48 credit hours) to enroll in the program.

State Requirements for Certification

In order to be certified, students must attain either an overall grade point average of 3.0 or an overall grade point average of 2.8 GPA and a qualifying score on the appropriate PRAXIS exams. More information about the exams required for certification can be found on the Educational Studies Department website under “ Teacher Certification> Student Teaching > Exam Information.”

Students seeking certification must meet all Swarthmore’s general requirements for graduation with a Bachelor’s degree, educational studies requirements for certification, and state teaching certification distribution requirements in mathematics, English literature, and English composition. The following outline presents the ways in which students might meet these state distribution requirements:

Mathematics: 6 credit hours. This may be fulfilled by any sufficient combination of the following options:

Activity

Credit Hour Value

Swarthmore 1-credit Math/Statistics or Natural Science course

4

Score of 4 or 5 on AP Calculus AB

4

Score of 4 or 5 on AP Calculus AB/BC

4

Score of 6 or 7 on the Higher Level IB Exam

4

Scores of 560 or higher on the SAT level 1 or II math level IC or IIC

3

CLEP math test (http://clep.collegeboard.org/exam)

4

Combination should total

6

English Literature: 3 credit hours. This may be fulfilled by any sufficient combination of the following options:

Activity

Credit Hour Value

Swarthmore 1-credit English Department course

4

Score of 4 or 5 on AP English Literature

4

Score of 6 or 7 on the Higher Level IB Exam

4

CLEP literature test (http://clep.collegeboard.org/exam)

4

Combination should total

3

English Composition: 3 credit hours, met by the College’s general distribution requirement of Writing courses.

Certification Options

Swarthmore offers a wide variety of teacher certification options for students who are interested in receiving this credential.

Elementary Certification (Grades Pre-K–4 and 4–8)

Certification in elementary education is granted to Swarthmore students through Eastern University. Students complete the majority of their coursework at Swarthmore, including student teaching, but must also complete 2 summer courses at Eastern University in order to receive elementary certification. The department recommends that students pursue two certifications from the state of Pennsylvania: one that allows students to teach in grades pre-K through 4 and one for grades 4 through 8.

Students must fulfill all of the state general distribution requirements. Additionally, required Swarthmore coursework includes:

  • EDUC 014: Introduction to Education
  • EDUC/PSYC 021: Educational Psychology
  • EDUC 042: Teaching Diverse Young Learners
  • EDUC/PSYC 026: Special Education
  • EDUC 053: Language Minority Education
  • Recommended—EDUC 023: Adolescence

The Eastern University summer school program consists of two elementary methods courses in Language Arts and Reading. The hybrid online and face-to-face course work begins in mid-May and ends in early June for a total cost of approximately $3,530 (cost as of spring 2014; students on financial aid can apply for support). Students receive 1 Swarthmore College credit for these courses.

Students must consult with the chair of Swarthmore’s Educational Studies Department regarding their program of study to ensure that it includes a representative distribution of English, social studies, math, and science coursework required for 4–8 certification.

Elementary Certification candidates complete one semester of student teaching through Swarthmore, which consists of EDUC 092: Curriculum and Methods (2 credits) and EDUC 093: Practice Teaching (2 credits).

Secondary Certification (Grades 7–12)

The department offers secondary (7–12) teacher certification in biology, chemistry, citizenship, English, mathematics, physics, and social studies. The department also offers a K-12 certification in French, German, Russian, or Spanish. Students must complete a major or special major in their area of certification. Majors/special majors in history, economics, or political science receive secondary certification in either citizenship or social studies, and majors/special majors in psychology or sociology/anthropology receive secondary certification in social studies.

In order to be certified, students should fulfill all of the state general distribution requirements. Additionally, students must complete a major or a special major in their area of certification and take a total of five and a half core courses in educational studies:

  • EDUC 014. Introduction to Education
  • EDUC/PSYC 021. Educational Psychology
  • EDUC/PSYC 023. Adolescence
  • EDUC 023A. Adolescents and Special Education (0.5 credit)
  • EDUC/PSYC 026. Special Education
  • EDUC 053. Language Minority Education

Students must complete subject-specific requirements that may or may not differ from the special major or major requirements already established. Students should refer to the subject-specific requirements charts on the Educational Studies Department website for the special major discipline’s course obligations with teacher certification.

Students must complete one semester of student teaching, which consists of EDUC 092: Curriculum and Methods (2 credits) and EDUC 093: Practice Teaching (2 credits).

World Language Teaching Certification (Grades K through 12)

Students who wish to teach a world language (Spanish, French, German or Russian) will receive K–12 teaching certification in their specific language area upon completion of the program. This will allow them to teach elementary, middle, and high school. All world language certification students should follow the pathway for secondary teacher certification to attain the K–12 certification. Refer to the Secondary Certification section for details.

Student Teaching

EDUC 092: Curriculum and Methods (2 credits) and EDUC 093: Practice Teaching (2 credits) are completed during the first semester of the senior year or in a ninth semester after graduation. Placement for practice teaching is available in a range of public and private schools.

Ninth Semester

Students who have completed all of the requirements for certification (in their discipline and in educational studies) except for student teaching may return following graduation to complete the teacher certification program during a ninth semester. During this semester, students can only take EDUC 092: Curriculum and Methods (2 credits) and EDUC 093: Practice Teaching (2 credits). This option is only offered in the fall, and the cost is $5,893.00 (as of spring 2014). Students in the ninth semester program have full access to computing and other campus facilities but are not eligible for campus housing.

Courses

EDUC 001C. The Writing Process: Pedagogy and Practice

(See ENGL 001C)
Fall 2014. Gladstein.

EDUC 014. Introduction to Education

This course provides a survey of issues in education within an interdisciplinary framework. In addition to considering the theories of individuals such as Dewey, Skinner, and Bruner, the course explores some major economic, historical, psychological, and sociological questions in American education and discusses alternative policies and programs. Topics are examined through readings, writing, discussion, and hands-on activity, including a school fieldwork placement. The course provides an opportunity for students to explore their interests in educational policy, student learning, and teaching. This course, or the first-year seminar EDUC 014F, is required for students pursuing teacher certification.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Each semester. Staff.

EDUC 014F. First-Year Seminar: Introduction to Education

This seminar will draw on materials from the disciplines of psychology, sociology, philosophy, history, and political science to address questions about American education. Topics are examined through readings, writing, discussion, and hands-on activity, including a school fieldwork placement. This course fulfills the prerequisite for further coursework in educational studies and provides an opportunity for students to explore their interests in educational policy, student learning, and teaching. This seminar, or EDUC 014, is required for students pursuing teacher certification.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Each semester. Staff.

EDUC 021. Educational Psychology

(Cross-listed as PSYC 021)
This course focuses on issues in learning and development that have particular relevance to understanding student thinking. Research and theoretical work on student learning and motivation provide the core readings for the course. In addition, students participate in a laboratory section that involves consideration of learning and motivation in an integrated, interdisciplinary public school classroom and provides an introduction to research methods. Required for students pursuing teacher certification.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Renninger.

EDUC 023. Adolescence

(Cross-listed as PSYC 023)
In this course, students examine adolescent development from psychological, sociological, and life-span perspectives, reading both traditional theory and challenges to that theory that consider issues of race, class, gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. During the first part of the term, students explore various aspects of individual development (e.g., cognitive, affective, physiological, etc.). The second part focuses on the adolescent’s experience in a range of social contexts (e.g., family, peer group, school, etc.). Required for students pursuing secondary teacher certification.
Prerequisite: EDUC 014 or permission of the instructor.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Brenneman.

EDUC 023A. Adolescents and Special Education

In this half credit attachment to EDUC 23, Adolescence, students will focus on meeting the needs of diverse adolescent learners. In particular, students will examine the unique psycho-social interactions between adolescents receiving special education services, their parents and the educators who work with them. Students will also explore strategies for addressing specific cognitive and academic needs of these adolescents in literacy, content area learning, and transitions out of school. Course includes a field placement. Required for students pursuing secondary teacher certification.
Prerequisite: EDUC 026/PSYC 026 (can be taken concurrently) or permission of the instructor. EDUC 023 can be taken concurrently with EDUC 023A.
Available as credit/no credit only.
0.5 credit.
Spring 2015. Linn.

EDUC 026. Special Education: Issues and Practice

(Cross-listed as PSYC 026)
This course is designed to provide students with a critical overview of special education, including its history, the classification and description of exceptionalities, and its legal regulation. Major issues related to identification, assessment, educational and therapeutic interventions, psychosocial aspects, and inclusion are examined.
Course includes a field placement. Required for students pursuing teacher certification.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Linn.

EDUC 041. Educational Policy

This course examines K-12 education policy formation, implementation, and effects in the United States. Students will develop a working knowledge of the policy landscape on the federal, state, and local levels and use this knowledge to examine the relationship between policy, power, and practice. The course will examine a range of current policy topics, potentially including school finance, issues of adequacy and equity, standards-based reform, assessment and accountability, bilingual education, school choice, early childhood education, special education, desegregation, and teacher quality and compensation. Drawing on a critical policy studies framework, students will examine education policies and develop strategies and projects that would support, critique and transform extant policies.
1 credit.
Fall 2015. Mayorga.

EDUC 042. Teaching Diverse Young Learners

This course explores the ways children learn in classrooms and construct meaning in their personal, community, and academic lives. The course is framed by theories of learning as transmissionist, constructivist, and participatory. Students will draw on ethnographies, research, their own learning histories, classroom observations, and positioning as novice learners to create optimal learning environments for diverse learners including but not limited to English-language learners, socioeconomically disadvantaged populations, culturally non-mainstream students, students with learning differences and disabilities, and students with socioemotional classifications. Course includes fieldwork. Required for elementary certification.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

EDUC 043. Teacher Narratives, Policy and Power

This course is an exploration of the lives of teachers: how they are framed within popular culture and policy, and how they frame themselves within the politics of the classroom, schools and broader society. Students will work with various critical social theories and analytical tools to think through teacher narratives, historical and sociological texts, film, policy debates, guest presentations, and other sources. Assignments will include conducting interviews with educators and producing mixed media projects that reframe educator identities.

1 credit.
Fall 2014. Mayorga.

EDUC 045. Literacies and Social Identities

This course explores the intersections of literacy practices and identities of gender, race, class, religion, ethnicity, and sexual orientation within communities of practice. It includes but is not limited to school settings. Students will work with diverse theory and analytical tools that draw on educational, anthropological, historical, sociological, linguistic, fictional, visual, popular readings and “scenes of literacy” from everyday practice. Fieldwork includes a Learning for Life partnership, tutoring, or community service in a literacy program.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

EDUC 053. Language Minority Education

(Cross-listed as LING 053)
This course examines the multifaceted issues facing English learners in U.S. schools. Course topics include theories of second language acquisition and bilingualism, the history of bilingual education in the United States, educational language policies and the impact of the English-only movement, and practical approaches to teaching linguistic minority students. Course readings draw from relevant literature in sociolinguistics, language policy, language acquisition, educational anthropology, and language pedagogy. Through fieldwork and small group projects, students have the opportunity to explore issues particular to a language minority population of their choice. Required for students pursuing teacher certification.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Allard.

EDUC 054. Oral and Written Language

(See LING 054)
Prerequisite: LING 001, 040, 045, or 050.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015. Napoli.

EDUC 064. Comparative Education

This course examines key issues and themes in education as they play out in schools and nations around the world. We will explore the roles of local, national, and international actors and organizations in the construction of educational goals and practice, using case studies and country studies to look for the interplay between local context and globalized movements in education. Topics will include immigration and schooling, equity, literacy and curriculum goals and constructs.
Prerequisite: EDUC 014 or permission of the instructor.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Smulyan.

EDUC 065. Educational Research for Social Change

In this course, students explore the potential for classroom, school, and educational change through research. Students will learn how to design a qualitative study in education, engaging in the processes of defining a research question, examining relevant literature, choosing appropriate methods for data collection, and analyzing data. Strongly recommended (.05) for special majors in educational studies who will complete a 1 or 2 credit thesis.
Prerequisite: EDUC 014 or permission of the instructor.
.05 or 1 credit.
Spring 2015. Allard.

EDUC 068. Urban Education

(Cross-listed as SOAN 020B)
This course examines issues of practice and policy, including financing, integration, compensatory education, curricular innovation, parent involvement, bilingual education, high-stakes testing, comprehensive school reform, governance, and multiculturalism. The special challenges faced by urban schools in meeting the needs of individuals and groups in a pluralistic society will be examined using the approaches of education, psychology, sociology, anthropology, political science, and economics. Current issues will also be viewed in historical perspective. This course includes fieldwork.
Eligible for BLST credit.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Mayorga.

EDUC 069. Savage Inaccuracies: The Facts and Economics of Education in America

(See ECON 005)
EDUC 014 is required to receive Educational Studies Department credit for this course.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Kuperberg.

EDUC 070. Outreach Practicum

This course is offered in conjunction with the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility. It is designed to support students involved in educational and community-based outreach in urban settings. Students’ volunteer experiences will provide text and case material for course work. Historical grounding in the construction of cities in general, and Chester, PA, in particular, will be provided. Criteria for effective practices will be identified for the range of volunteer roles in community service projects.
0.5 or 1 credit.
Spring 2015. Jones-Walker.

EDUC 071. Introduction to Performing Arts Education: Music

(See DANC 091 and MUSI 091)
EDUC 014 is required to receive Educational Studies Department credit for this course.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015. Whitman.

EDUC 072. Foreign Language Teaching and Pedagogy

(See Modern Languages and Literatures)
0.5 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015. Staff.

EDUC 073. Creative Writing Outreach Course

(See ENGL 070L)
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Brown.

EDUC 091A. Special Topics

With permission of the instructor, qualified students may choose to pursue a topic of special interest in education through a field project involving classroom or school practice.
Available as a credit/no credit course only.
0.5 or 1 credit.
Each semester. Staff.

EDUC 091B. Special Topics

With permission of the instructor, students may choose to pursue a topic of special interest by designing an independent reading or project that usually requires a comprehensive literature review, laboratory work, and/or field-based research.
0.5 or 1 credit.
Each semester. Staff.

EDUC 091C. Special Topics (Music Education)

(See MUSI 091C)
Available as a credit/no credit course only.
0.5 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015. Whitman.

EDUC 092. Curriculum and Methods

This seminar is taken concurrently with EDUC 093 by students pursuing teacher certification. Readings and discussion focus on the applications of educational research and theory to classroom practice. Course content covers: lesson planning; classroom management; inquiry-oriented teaching strategies; questioning and discussion methods; literacy; the integration of technology and media; classroom-based and standardized assessments; instruction of special needs populations; topics in multicultural, nonracist, and nonsexist education; and legislation regarding the rights of students and teachers. As part of the seminar, students take a series of special methods workshops in their content area. Required for students pursuing teacher certification.
2 credits.
Fall 2014. Smulyan.

EDUC 093. Practice Teaching

This course involves supervised full-time teaching in either secondary or elementary schools for students pursuing teacher certification. Students pursuing certification must take EDUC 092 concurrently. (Single-credit practice teaching may be arranged for individuals not seeking certification.)
2 credits.
Fall 2014. Staff.

EDUC 096–097. Thesis

1 or 2 credits, normally in conjunction with a special major.
Each semester. Staff.

EDUC 098. Psychology and Educational Studies Thesis

1 or 2 credits, normally in conjunction with a special major.
Each semester. Renninger.

Seminars

Honors seminars are open to all students. Priority is given to honors majors and minors.

EDUC 121. Psychology and Practice

This seminar focuses on general developmental principles revealed in and applicable to contexts of practice as well as practical applications of research and theory in developmental psychology. Seminar foci include: (1) use of the literatures in developmental, educational, and social psychology and learning and cognitive science to identify key indicators for assessing changed understanding and motivation; (2) preparation of literature reviews on a topic of each student’s choice; and (3) collaborative work on an evaluation research project addressing a “live” issue or problem identified by a local teacher, school, or community organization.
Prerequisites: EDUC 021.
Writing course.
2 credits (or 1 credit with permission of the instructor).
Not offered 2014–2015.

EDUC 131. Social and Cultural Perspectives on Education

In this seminar, students examine schools as institutions that both reflect and challenge existing social and cultural patterns of thought, behavior, and knowledge production. Seminar participants study and use qualitative methods of research and examine topics including the aims of schooling, parent/school/community interaction, schooling and identity development, and classroom and school restructuring.
Prerequisites: EDUC 014 and an additional course in the 060s.
Writing course.
2 credits.
Spring 2015. Smulyan.

EDUC 151. Literacy Research

This seminar explores theories and methods in the design and implementation of qualitative studies of literacy, evaluation of literacy programs and pedagogy, and study of literacy policies. Students review relevant literature and participate in a field-based collaborative research project or program evaluation.
Prerequisites: EDUC 014 and an additional course in the 040–060s. Either EDUC 042 or 045 is highly recommended.
Writing course.
2 credits.
Fall 2014. Anderson.

EDUC 153. Latinos and Education

This seminar explores the schooling experiences of Latinos in the U.S. from interdisciplinary perspectives, including sociology, history, anthropology, and linguistics. Course participants engage with questions around educational quality and access, language and culture, immigration and demographic change, curriculum and pedagogy, and community activism in relation to the education of Latinos. Students will study asset-based approaches to research and teaching and will use one or more of these research methodologies in a collaborative, community-based research project in and for a local Latino-serving school. Prerequisites: EDUC 053 or EDUC 068
2 credits.
Not offered 2014–2015.

EDUC 167. Identities and Education

This course explores intersections between identities of race, class, gender, sexual orientation and public education in the United States. Readings will draw on the fields of anthropology, legal studies, and cultural studies. Two central frameworks, Cultural Production and Critical Race Theory, will guide consideration of how social structures inform the realities of schooling and how racial, class-based, gendered and sexual identities are formed within the context of schools.
Prerequisites: EDUC 014 and EDUC 068.
Eligible for BLST credit.
2 credits.
Fall 2015. Jones-Walker.

EDUC 180. Honors Thesis

A 2-credit thesis is required for students completing special honors majors including educational studies. The thesis may be counted for 2 credits in educational studies or for 1 credit in educational studies and 1 credit in the other discipline in the student’s Honors Program.
2 credits. Each semester. Staff.