Chinese

HAILI KONG, Professor and Chair
ELEONORE BAGINSKI, Administrative Coordinator
BETHANNE SEUFERT, Administrative Assistant

Chinese
ALAN BERKOWITZ, Professor
HAILI KONG, Professor
NAN MA, Visiting Instructor
JU-HUI CHIU, Lecturer
WOL A KANG, Lecturer
KIRSTEN E. SPEIDEL, Lecturer

Language Resource Center
MICHAEL JONES, Language Resource Center Director
ALEXANDER SAVOTH, Language Resource Center Technologist

Chinese

The Academic Program

Students may major or minor in Chinese in both the Course and Honors Programs. The Chinese major contains components of language, literature and culture. Study abroad is strongly encouraged and supported, and contributes directly to a major or minor in Chinese. Students of Chinese also may choose a special major in interdisciplinary Chinese studies (see below), or a major in Asian studies (see under Asian studies), where Chinese language courses above the first-year level as well as Chinese literature and culture courses and credit for study abroad normally may be counted toward the major.

Students interested in majoring or minoring in Chinese should consult with the section head of Chinese as soon as possible.

First- through fourth-year Chinese language courses are offered each year, as is an introductory course on reading Classical Chinese. First-year Chinese and the Introduction to Classical Chinese have no prerequisites and are open to the entire student community. Literature, culture, and film courses in translation also are offered each year and are open to all students. Students of Chinese are particularly urged to take these classes as a means of gaining perspective on traditional and modern Chinese literature and culture over more than two millennia, from early times into the contemporary. Seminars welcome students not majoring or minoring in Chinese, with permission of the instructor.

Introductory and intermediate Chinese language courses are intensive and carry 1.5 credits per semester. Students should plan to take these courses as early as possible so that studying in China can be incorporated into their curriculum.

Course Major in Chinese

  1. A minimum of nine credits in courses numbered 003B and above.
  2. Mandatory completion of the following courses: 020, 021, 033 or equivalent; at least one course or seminar on modern Chinese literature/film in translation, and at least one course or seminar on pre-modern literature/culture in translation.
  3. Study abroad in a program approved by the section is strongly recommended; transferred credits normally may be counted toward the major.
  4. A minimum of six credits of work must be completed at Swarthmore.
  5. A culminating exercise, honors seminar, or thesis.
  6. Senior Colloquium.

Course Minor in Chinese

  1. A minimum of five credits of work in courses numbered 004B and above.
  2. At least two credits in Chinese language courses numbered 004B and above.
  3. At least two credits in classical or modern literature/culture/film.
  4. A minimum of three credits of work must be completed at Swarthmore.
  5. Study abroad in a program approved by the section is strongly recommended; transferred credits normally may be counted toward the minor.
  6. Senior Colloquium.

Honors Major in Chinese

Requirements for the honors major in Chinese essentially are the same as those for the course major, excepting the culminating exercise. An honors major in Chinese will consist of examinations in Chinese language, literature and culture. Work done abroad may be incorporated, where appropriate. Honors preparations in Chinese consist of 2-credit seminar; designated pairs of courses (or 1-credit attachment to designated 1-credit course); or a 2-credit thesis. Senior honors study is mandatory and normally is done in the spring semester of the senior year. Work is arranged on an individual basis, and candidates may receive up to one credit for completion of the work. Honors examinations normally will consist of three 3-hour written examinations and a 30-minute oral for each examination.

Honors students of Chinese may also consider a special major in interdisciplinary Chinese studies that is coordinated by the section head of Chinese, or an honors major in Asian studies (see under Asian studies).

Honors Minor

in Chinese It is possible to prepare for an honors minor in Chinese in either Chinese language or in Chinese literature in translation. Requirements for the honors minor in Chinese essentially are the same as those for the course minor. The honors preparation will consist of a 2-credit seminar, or a designated pair of courses (or a 1-credit attachment to a designated 1-credit course). Senior honors study is mandatory and normally is done in the spring semester of the senior year; work is arranged on an individual basis, and candidates will have the option of receiving 0.5 credit for completion of the work. The Honors examination normally will consist of one 3-hour written examination and a 30-minute oral examination.

Students of Chinese may also consider an honors minor in Asian studies (see under Asian studies).

Special Major in Interdisciplinary Chinese Studies

  1. A minimum of 10 credits in courses numbered 003B and higher.
  2. Must complete the following courses: 012 or higher; at least three additional courses on language/literature/culture/film, at least one of these concerning the modern period and at least one concerning the pre-modern period.
  3. Study abroad in a program approved by the section is strongly recommended; transferred credits normally may be counted toward the major.
  4. A minimum of six credits of work must be completed at Swarthmore.
  5. At least one and up to three credits can be earned from other departments on China-related subjects with the approval of the Chinese section.
  6. A culminating exercise, honors seminar or thesis.
  7. Senior Colloquium.

Off-Campus Study

Study abroad is particularly encouraged for students of Chinese; academic credit (full or partial) is generally approved for participation in several recommended programs of varying duration in the People’s Republic of China and in Taiwan. In the People’s Republic, these include, but are not limited to, the Inter-University Program (IUP) Program at Tsing-hua University, the Associated Colleges in China (ACC) Program, the CET Program in Harbin, and the Middlebury program in Kunming. In Taiwan, these include the International Chinese Language Program (ICLP), the Mandarin Training Center in Taipei, and the Chinese Language Center, National Cheng Kung University in Taiwan.

Courses

CHIN 001B–002B. Introduction to Mandarin Chinese

Students who start in the 00lB–002B sequence must complete 002B to receive credit for 001B.
An intensive introduction to spoken and written Mandarin Chinese, with emphasis on oral Chinese practice. Designed to impart an active command of basic grammar. Introduces 350 to 400 characters and develops the ability to read and write in simple modern Chinese.
1.5 credits.

CHIN 001B.

Fall 2014. Speidel, Kang.

CHIN 002B.

Spring 2015. Speidel, Kang.

CHIN 003B, 004B. Second-Year Mandarin Chinese

Designed for students who have mastered basic grammar and 350 to 400 characters. Combines intensive oral practice with writing and reading in the modern language. Emphasis is on rapid expansion of vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, and thorough understanding of grammatical patterns. Prepares students for advanced study at the College and in China.
1.5 credits.

CHIN 003B.

Fall 2014. Ma, Chiu.

CHIN 004B.

Spring 2015. Ma, Chiu.

CHIN 005. Chinese for Advanced Beginners I

Designed for students of Chinese heritage who are able to communicate in Chinese on simple daily life topics and perhaps read Chinese with a limited vocabulary (about 100 characters). An intensive introduction to spoken and written Mandarin Chinese, with emphasis on the development of reading and writing ability. Prepares students for advanced studies at the College and in China.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Chiu.

CHIN 006. Chinese for Advanced Beginners II

Designed for students of Chinese heritage who are able to communicate in Chinese with a command of basic grammar and a vocabulary (about 800 characters). An intensive introduction at the intermediate level to Mandarin Chinese, with emphasis on the development of reading and writing ability. Prepares students for advanced studies at the College and in China.
Prerequisite: CHIN 005, or CHIN 002B, or equivalent language skills.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Chiu.

CHIN 007. Chinese/Japanese Calligraphy

(Cross-listed as JPNS 007)
Calligraphy is the art of beautiful handwriting. This course will introduce students to the importance of calligraphy in East Asian Culture. In addition to being a valuable cultural skill, calligraphy is also a process of self-cultivation and self-expression, which reflects the mind-set of the writer. Thus, students will have the opportunity to learn Chinese/Japanese characters not only as linguistic symbols but also as cultural emblems and as an art form. Course objectives include learning to appreciate the beauty of Chinese/Japanese calligraphy, experiencing calligraphy by writing with a brush and ink, and studying various philosophies of calligraphy. In addition to learning several different calligraphic scripts, students will be introduced to the origin, evolution, and aesthetic principles of the Chinese and Japanese writing systems, as well as calligraphy’s close connections with painting and poetry. Persistent hands-on practice will be required of all students; course work will include in-class practice, individual/group instruction, reading assignments, and take-home assignments. This class is open to all students and has no language requirement. Due to the course’s practicum component, enrollment will be limited by lottery to 10 students. The course can be repeated for credit.
0.5 credit.
Spring 2015. Jo.

CHIN 009. First-Year Seminar: Heaven, Earth, and Man: Ways of Thought in Traditional Chinese Culture

(Cross-listed as LITR 009CH)
This introductory course explores the most influential currents of thought and culture in traditional China, through directed readings and discussions of original sources in translation.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

CHIN 011. Third-Year Chinese

Concentrates on strengthening and further developing skills in reading, speaking, and writing modern Chinese, through a diversity of materials and media.
Classes are conducted in Chinese, with precise translation also a component.
Prerequisite: CHIN 004B or equivalent language skills.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Ma.

CHIN 011A. Third-Year Chinese Conversation

This course meets once a week for 75 minutes and concentrates on the further development of skills in speaking and listening through multimedia materials (including selected movies and clips). Students are required to read chosen texts (including Internet materials and short stories) and prepare assignments for the purpose of generating discussion in class. Moreover, students will write out skits or reports for oral presentation in Chinese before they present them in class. The class is conducted entirely in Chinese.
Prerequisite: CHIN 004B or equivalent language skills.
0.5 credit.
Fall 2014. Kang.

CHIN 012. Advanced Chinese

A multimedia course concentrating on greatly expanding skills in understanding and using modern Chinese in a broad variety of cultural and literary contexts, through a diversity of authentic materials in various media, including the Internet.
Prerequisite: CHIN 011 or equivalent language skills.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Ma.

CHIN 012A. Advanced Chinese Conversation

This 0.5-credit course meets once a week for 75 minutes and concentrates on the further development of skills in speaking and listening through multimedia materials (including movies and clips). Students are required to read chosen texts (including Internet materials and short stories) and prepare assignments for the purpose of generating discussion in class. Moreover, students will write out skits or reports for oral presentation in Chinese before they present them in class.
The class is conducted entirely in Chinese.
Prerequisite: CHIN 011 and/or 011A or equivalent language skills.
0.5 credit.
Spring 2015. Kang.

CHIN 013A. Foreign Language Teaching and Pedagogy

(Cross-listed as EDUC 072)
This course has two elements that are developed together throughout the course of the semester. Students can serve the Swarthmore community by teaching a foreign language to local elementary school students in an after-school program that meets two times/week. Students must teach for the entire 6-week session, two days per week. During the evening pedagogy sessions held on campus, we will discuss writing weekly lesson plans, foreign language acquisition in children, teaching methodologies and approaches. We use a common goal-oriented curriculum among all the languages. Students must register for the language or educational studies course that they will be teaching and for a service time (A) M/W or (B) T/Th.
0.5 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

CHIN 016. Substance, Shadow, and Spirit in Chinese Literature and Culture

(Cross-listed as LITR 016CH)
This course will explore the literary and intellectual world of traditional Chinese culture through original writings in English translation, including both poetry and prose. Topics to be discussed include Taoism, Confucianism, and the contouring of Chinese culture; immortality, wine, and allaying the mundane; and the religious dimension, disengagement, and the appreciation of the natural world. The course also will address cultural and literary formulations of conduct and persona, and the expression of individualism in an authoritarian society.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Berkowitz.

CHIN 020. Readings in Modern Chinese

This course aims to perfect the student’s Mandarin Chinese skills and at the same time to introduce a few major topics concerning Chinese literature and other types of writing since the May Fourth Movement. All readings, writing, and discussion are in Chinese.
Prerequisite: Three years of Chinese or the equivalent.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Maiheng Dietrich

CHIN 021. Topics in Modern Chinese

Reading and examination of individual authors, selected themes, genres, and periods, for students with strong Chinese-language proficiency. All readings, writings, and discussions are in Chinese.
Prerequisite: CHIN 020 or its equivalent.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Ma.

CHIN 023. Modern Chinese Literature: A New Novelistic Discourse (1918–1948)

(Cross-listed as LITR 023CH)
Modern Chinese literary texts created between 1918 and 1948, presenting a series of political, social, cultural, and ideological dilemmas underlying 20th-century Chinese history. The class will discuss fundamental issues of modernity and new literary developments under the impact of the May Fourth Movement. All texts are in English translation, and the class is conducted in English.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

CHIN 027. The Story in Dynastic China

(Cross-listed as LITR 027CH)
In this class we will read in translation and discuss a fair sampling of imperial China's most renowned stories. In exploring the most celebrated and influential examples of narrative literature from early times into the Qing dynasty, we will look at these stories, some short, others quite elaborate, in terms of overt structure and content, as well as backgrounded literary and cultural material, and we will address their production and consumption in literati and popular contexts. We also will consider these writings in terms of the formulation of enduring cultural contours of character, allegory, and lyricism; individual and society; aesthetics and emotion; imagination and realism; heroism and valor. All readings will be in English, mostly translations of original texts, with some supplementary writings about traditional Chinese fiction.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Berkowitz.

CHIN 033. Introduction to Classical Chinese

(Cross-listed as LING 033)
This is an introductory course on reading one of the world’s great classical languages. Classical Chinese includes both the language of China’s classical literature as well as the literary language used for writing in China for well over 2 millennia until earlier this century. Complemented with readings in English about Chinese characters and classical Chinese, this course imparts the principal structures of the classical language through an analytical presentation of the rudiments of the language and close reading of original texts. It is not a lecture course and requires active, regular participation on the part of the student, with precise translation into English an integral component. The course is conducted in English. The course is open to all interested students and has no prerequisites; no previous preparation in Chinese is required.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Berkowitz.

CHIN 035. Readings in Classical Chinese

In this class, we will read some fantastic, enduring writings from Classical China, all in the original. Readings will cover many genres, including stories, biographies, history, philosophy, and poetry, and will range over the centuries of ancient and imperial China.
Prerequisite: one semester of classical Chinese or permission of the instructor.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

CHIN 055. Contemporary Chinese Cinema: The New Waves (1984–2005)

(Cross-listed as LITR 055CH/FMST 055)
Cinema has become a special form of cultural mirror representing social dynamics and drastic changes in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan since the mid-1980s. The course will develop a better understanding of changing Chinese culture by analyzing cinematic texts and the new wave in the era of globalization. All films are English subtitled, and the class is conducted in English.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Kong.

CHIN 069. The Art of Living: Taste and Aesthetics in Chinese Cultural Traditions

(Cross-listed as LITR 069CH)
This course will explore various dimensions of taste and aesthetics in traditional Chinese culture—from the earliest times into the recent past. Broader aspects of the course will include concept, form, and substance in classical literary, and philosophical formulations; ritual practice and ceremonial performance; and continuities and disjunctures in private vs. public and individual vs. societal taste. More focused readings and discussions will concern food, alcohol, tea, and the culinary arts; appreciation, aesthetics, and poetics in music, painting, calligraphy, literature, sculpture, and theater; the harmony of the human body and the evaluation of beauty and suitability in men and women; landscape appreciation and visions of the natural world; leisure and the passa tempo pursuits of Go, flower and tree arrangement, and elegant gatherings.
No prerequisites, no knowledge of Chinese required; all readings in English.
Eligible for ASIA credit.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Berkowitz.

CHIN 081. Transcending the Mundane: Taoism in Chinese Literature and Culture

(Cross-listed as LITR 081CH)
Chinese civilization has been imbued with Taoism for some 2.5 millennia, from popular belief and custom to intellectual and literary culture. In addition to consideration of the texts and contexts of both philosophical and religious Taoism, the class will examine the articulation and role of Taoism in Chinese literature and culture and the enduring implications of the Taoist ethos. All readings will be in English.
Prerequisite: One introductory course on Chinese culture or religion or permission of the instructor.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

CHIN 089 Tea In China: Cultural And Environmental Perspectives

This course will focus on “Tea in China” through three major aspects: the cultural, social, and historical; tea cultivation and the natural environment; and the economies of tea. Tea has been experiencing a transformation from China’s national drink and sipping culture to a global drink and life style. Literary writings and films will be combined with relevant readings and audio-visual materials for the class. Tea experts and professionals will join us to offer guest lectures in order to enhance our understanding of tea from bio-ecological and botanical perspectives. In addition to this interdisciplinary cultural course, participants will have the chance to appreciate and taste major kinds of tea from Mainland China and Taiwan during the semester. All required readings/screenings are in English or English translation/subtitled. Chinese language ability will be an asset, but it is not required.  

Eligible for Asian Studies credit.
Spring 2015
(A. Berkowitz and H. Kong)

CHIN 090. Practicum in Bridging Swarthmore and Local Chinese Communities

Students will engage in directed projects in local Chinese communities under the supervision of the instructor. The projects will concern tutoring and translation or other social services within the immigrant groups. Fieldwork will be tied to theoretical and applied academic learning and will foster intercultural understanding and intellectual growth. A final written project will be required for credit. Speakers of any Chinese language/dialects are particularly welcome, as are students of Chinese language and others who wish to develop their interest in this area. Credit is awarded CR/NC.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

CHIN 091. Special Topics in Chinese Literature and Culture in Translation: Dancing Across Borders; the Body, Aesthetics and Ideologies in 20th-Century China

(Cross-listed as LITR 091CH)
This course uses dance as a unique artistic and theoretical prism to analyze the complex interplay among the body, aesthetics, and ideologies in 20th-century China. The goal of the course is to familiarize the students with the transnational and transcultural context within which modern dance was first introduced into China from the West via Japan, and to show the students how to situate the evolving trajectory of dance in China in the power struggles among competing political agendas, aesthetics, ideologies, and art forms. This course teaches the basic methods to read, reconstruct, and analyze dance works. The reading materials are all in English.
Eligible for ASIA credit.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

CHIN 092. Special Topics in Chinese Literature and Culture in Chinese

This course will concentrate on selected themes, genres, or critical problems in Chinese literature.
All readings are in Chinese.
Prerequisite: Four years of Chinese or the equivalent.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

CHIN 093. Directed Reading
CHIN 096. Thesis
CHIN 099. Senior Colloquium

0.5 or 1.0 credit.
Spring 2015.

Seminars

CHIN 103. Lu Xun and His Legacy in 20th-Century China

This seminar is focused on topics concerning modernity, political/social change, gender, and morality through close examination of intellectuals’ responses to the chaotic era reflected in their literature writings in 20th-century China. Literary forms, styles, and changing aesthetic principles are also included for discussion. Literary texts, chosen from Lu Xun to Gao Xingjian, will be analyzed in a social and historical context. All texts are in English translation, and the seminar is conducted in English.
2 credits.
Not offered 2014–2015.

CHIN 104. Chinese Poetry

This seminar will explore Chinese poetry throughout ancient and imperial China. We will read and discuss a good many of the most renowned poems and poets, and trace the immutable role of poetry in Chinese traditional culture. We will learn how to read a Chinese poem, investigate predominant styles and genres, and trace texts and writers in context. And we will follow the development and significance of themes and imagery, examine the formulation of a literary aesthetics, and savor the telling of stories and the expression of feeling and philosophy through the medium of poetry. Readings will be in English, with many poems also explicated through the original Chinese. No knowledge of Chinese is required, but previous background in some aspect of Chinese literature, history, and culture will be helpful.
2 credits.
Fall 2014. Berkowitz.

CHIN 105. Fiction in Traditional China: People and Places, Journeys, and Romances

In this seminar, we will explore the most celebrated and influential examples of novelistic literature in traditional, pre-modern China. We will look at these extended, elaborate writings in terms of overt structure and content as well as backgrounded literary and cultural material, and we will address their production and consumption in literati and popular contexts. We also will consider these writings in terms of the formulation of enduring cultural contours of allegory and lyricism, individual and society, aesthetics and emotion, imagination and realism, heroism and valor.
All readings will be in English translation.
2 credits.
Not offered 2014–2015.

CHIN 106. Seminar in Traditional Chinese Literature

2 credits.
Not offered 2014–2015.

CHIN 108. The Remaking of Cinematic China: Zhang Yimou, Wong Kar-wai, and Ang Lee

The seminar focuses on three leading filmmakers, Zhang Yimou, Wong Kar-wai, and Ang Lee, and their cinematic products, which have not only won international praises but also fundamentally reconstructed the national cinemas. We will explore their impact on the formation of the new wave of Chinese-language cinemas since the mid-1980s and its recent new developments by examining all possible aspects in the context of social and cultural change.
2 credits.
Spring 2015. Kong.

CHIN 109. Daoism

This seminar will look at the texts and contexts of both philosophical and religious Daoism, from intellectual and literary culture to popular belief and custom. It will explore the ways of Daoism from early into modern times: texts and contexts; sectarian religion and individual praxis; cultural taproot and personal mindset; cosmology and alchemy; gods, saints, priests, and recluses; aesthetics and the arts.
All readings will be in English.
Eligible for ASIA credit.
2 credits.
Not offered 2014–2015.

CHIN 110. Beijing and Shanghai: Tale of Two Cities

This seminar focuses on the culture and urban history of China’s two major cities: Beijing—the capital of both imperial and post-1949 China—and Shanghai—one of the earliest treaty ports open to the West and the center of today’s Chinese economy. Through comparative analyses of urban planning, fiction about, and film of the two cities, we will examine the significance of these two distinct yet connected urban cultures in modern and contemporary China. The students are encouraged to develop a research project comparing the two cities, using either Chinese or English-language sources. This course is open to all students above the first year who have finished previous coursework in Chinese literature, film, art, urban studies or history, or have permission of the instructor. The required course readings and all discussions will be in English.
Eligible for ASIA credit.
2 credits.
Not offered 2014–2015.

CHIN 199. Senior Honors Study

Chinese Courses Not Currently Offered

CHIN 008. First-Year Seminar: Literary and Cinematic Presentation of Modern China (Cross-listed as LITR 008CH)
CHIN 009. First-Year Seminar: Heaven, Earth, and Man: Ways of Thought in Traditional Chinese Culture (Cross-listed as LITR 009CH)
CHIN 018. The Classical Tradition in Chinese Literature (Cross-listed as LITR 018CH)
CHIN 019. First-Year Seminar: Singular Lives and Cultural Paradigms in Early and Imperial China (Cross-listed as LITR 019CH)
CHIN 025. Contemporary Chinese Fiction: Mirror of Social Change (1949–2005) (Cross-listed as LITR 025CH)
CHIN 027. Women Writers in 20th-Century China (Cross-listed as LITR 027CH)
CHIN 056. History of Chinese Cinema (1905–2005) (Cross-listed as LITR 056CH)
CHIN 063. Comparative Perspectives: China in the Ancient World (Cross-listed as LITR 063CH)
CHIN 066. Chinese Poetry (Cross-listed as LITR 066CH)

CHIN 071. Invaded Ideology and Translated Modernity: A Comparative Study of Modern Chinese and Japanese Literatures at Their Formative Stages (1900–1937) (Cross-listed as LITR 071CH)