Return to News Clippings.

Clippings collected April 19, 2001

Published by the Office of News and Information


Chicago Tribune

Headline: SMALL COLLEGES FEEL PRESSURE AS `BRAND-NAME' UNIVERSITIES GAIN AN EDGE

04/15/2001

Page 1

By Meg McSherry Breslin, Tribune staff reporter

BODY:

In the world of college bumper stickers as status symbols, the Ivy Leagues and big-name state universities are often the winners for high school seniors. That reality means small liberal arts colleges--places that thrived only a generation ago--are continuing to face a variety of competitive pressures, forcing some schools to close or consider mergers and others to rethink their strategies for success. Even small liberal arts schools that have held their own in recruiting drives in recent years say it's tougher to attract students drawn in by the prestige and media attention that larger state schools and the Ivy Leagues garner.

...

According to U.S. News' rankings of America's best colleges, the top national liberal arts schools include Amherst, Swarthmore , Williams, Wellesley, Smith and Grinnell.

 

 

 

Chicago Tribune

 

Headline: Commentary

 

Voice of the people (letter)

GA Finch

04/18/2001 - Page 14

BODY:

Although it is always gratifying to read about the role liberal arts colleges play in American higher education, I believe Meg McSherry Breslin's "Small colleges feel pressure as `brand-name' universities gain an edge, liberal arts schools struggle to compete" (Education today, April 15) prematurely sounded the death knell of liberal arts colleges. Elite colleges like Amherst, Williams and Swarthmore will continue to compete favorably with larger institutions like the University of Michigan, Stanford and Princeton for the most accomplished students. ...

 

 

 

Wall St. Journal

April 13, 2001

Section: Letters to the Editor

BODY:

...

To see Swarthmore and Williams, among others, listed as former safety schools now rising to a new level is shocking. These schools have been among the most highly selective and esteemed in the country for years. U.S. News & World Report's survey of National Liberal Arts Colleges has ranked Swarthmore and Williams at either the Nos. 1, 2, or 3 positions since its inception.

Students admitted by the Ivies are far from guaranteed acceptance by these so-called backup schools. Using acceptance rates in defining ease of admittance is deceptive. Many students apply to Ivies as their long-shot, flooding their applicant pools with less worthy candidates. This practice is not as common at more obscure schools of equal caliber.

While these institutions may not be well known in mainstream America, their reputation in the academic world is every bit as prestigious as the Ivies. Labeling these colleges as newcomers to this status disregards these schools' long-standing traditions of excellence.

Robert Howard

Austin, Texas

 

 

Business Times
(Singapore)

Headline: Picking the right US college.

04/17/2001

By Adeline Chuah.

BODY:

WITH about 3,000 institutions of higher learning scattered across 50 states, the US offers a wide range of educational opportunities. So how should a student decide where to go?

...

Little Ivies: These are the elite liberal arts colleges, such as Amherst, Williams, Smith, Wellesley and Swarthmore. With small and selective enrolments, they focus on quality classroom teaching for undergraduate students, rather than research.

 

 

 

 

U.S. News & World Report

HEADLINE: Slimmer chances for thick envelope

April 23, 2001

SECTION: OUTLOOK; VITAL STATISTICS; Pg. 16

LENGTH: 266 words

BODY:

Most kids will know by this week whether they're going to their dream school. But with two thirds of high school students now heading to college, getting in is getting harder.

...

Acceptance rates, top five liberal arts colleges:

			               1990		2001
 
Amherst College		20 pct.		19 pct.*
Swarthmore College	    32		       23* *
Williams College 	         28		        24

 

 

 

 

The Christian Science Monitor

HEADLINE: Playing at life

April 19, 2001, Thursday

SECTION: FEATURES; IDEAS; Pg. 14

LENGTH: 1738 words

BYLINE: Mary Wiltenburg Special to The Christian Science Monitor

HIGHLIGHT: As ever more complex computer games take on the trappings of simulated lives, what are they teaching players about their actual lives?

BODY:

...

The extraordinary popularity of the game, and the great number of social simulation games now being developed, raises the question: As games take on the trappings of simulated lives, what might they be teaching players about their actual lives?

This isn't just a question for the concerned parents of a few monosyllabic teenagers. Computer gamers no longer fit the narrow profile of what cultural historian Tim Burke, at Swarthmore College, jokingly calls "unwashed geeks in their basements."

...

With so many people now playing computer and video games, and at a time when fingers point to violent games each time a suburban teen opens fire at a high school, the question of what messages games impart is more relevant than ever. It's one that Burke, of Swarthmore, has thought a lot about, as he plays and researches the social impact of The Sims.

"Critics of the game tend to fall into two camps. There are those who say, 'Look at this stupid game. It sets up a pattern of endless climbing the social ladder to attain material things. It's ridiculous.' But on the other side, there are people saying: 'Isn't this interesting? The game's emphasis on material gains makes us think about what else there is [to value].' "

 

 

 

The Boston Globe

HEADLINE: RAZING A GENDER BARRIER SMITH OFFERS ENGINEERING WITH LIBERAL ARTS CONTEXT

April 16, 2001, Monday ,THIRD EDITION

SECTION: METRO/REGION; Pg. A1

LENGTH: 1126 words

BYLINE: By David Abel, GLOBE STAFF

BODY:

NORTHAMPTON - Maybe it's because teachers discouraged them from learning math and science. Or maybe it's just the abstract way colleges teach the subject. Whatever the reason, women have yet to bridge the gender gap in engineering. Unlike fields such as medicine, law, or journalism, engineering remains almost entirely a male preserve: Fewer than one in 10 US engineers are women, and only one in five undergraduates who earn engineering degrees are women. In an effort to challenge that male dominance, 19 students at Smith College this year set out on a four-year track to earn the first engineering degrees ever offered at any of the nation's women's colleges.

...

Although a few engineering programs exist at liberal arts colleges, including Bucknell, Dartmouth, and Swarthmore, the only other women's school now planning an engineering program is Effat College in Jeddah, Saudia Arabia. At a recent "engineering summit" at Smith, deans from schools including MIT and Michigan hailed Smith's efforts. John Slaughter, president of the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, lauded Smith's approach, saying that future engineers must study "Bach and botany, Isaiah and isotopes."

 

 

Wall St. Journal

Self-Employed Parents Frequently Face A Bias When Applying for College Aid

April 15, 2001

Section: Personal Business

By DAVE LINDORFF

BODY:

Self-employed parents with college-bound children could be in for a shock this fall. That is because many private colleges and universities are tough on the self-employed when evaluating financial need. Private colleges and universities routinely disallow some of the basic deductions the self-employed take for business expenses -- things like meals and entertainment, travel and depreciation. For the one in 11 self-employed Americans, this often means less aid to pay for college -- which today can cost $37,000 a year.

...

However, calls to a number of highly rated private colleges -- including Stanford University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Princeton University, Swarthmore College, Sarah Lawrence College and Wesleyan University -- suggest that the typical approach taken by financial-aid officials is to disallow Schedule C expense deductions.

 

 

 

Chronicle of Higher Education

Headline: Academics in South Korea Ponder a Future Tied Closely to the North

April 20, 2001

By DAVID COHEN

BODY:

...

Although the two Koreas share the same language, religious background, aesthetics, and ancient history, their popular cultures and systems of government are far apart. For the vast majority of communist North Korea's 22 million inhabitants, says Mr. Lho, this most typical of capitalist South Korean nighttime scenes might just as well be happening 130light-years away.

...

Mr. Ladner, a self-described "academic diplomat," says his university is exploring options for establishing institutional links with North Korea in the areas of engineering, and especially, English-language programs, the latter possibly being based at North Korea's Kim Il Sung University. Similar efforts have been explored in the recent past at the University of Hawaii, the University of California at Berkeley, and Swarthmore College.

 

 

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

Headline: AT SCOTT, A LECTURE ON SALVIAS IN ALL THEIR DELIGHTFUL FORMS

Friday, April 13, 2001

Section: FEATURES HOME & DESIGN

Edition: CITY-D - Page: D05

By Denise Cowie

BODY:

The wonderfully diverse world of salvias will be the focus of a lecture at Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College on Thursday. Betsy Clebsch, author of A Book of Salvias: Sages for Every Garden (Timber Press, $29.95), will show slides and talk about the cultural requirements and history of salvias, which are grown for their beautiful flowers and fragrant leaves. ...

 

 

 

THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

Headline: SECRET MISSIONS FOR CHRIST

Sunday, April 15, 2001

Section: ACCENT

Page: COVER

STORY BY CAROL MCGRAW * PHOTOS BY ANDY TEMPLETON

BODY:

...

The Bible Courier's Prayer, as that prayer is called, is being used more often these days as Christians step up missions for the persecuted church in far-flung areas of the Third World. More Christians were killed for their faith in the 20th century than in the previous 19, officials say. Pope John Paul II refers to it as `` the century of martyrdom.'' And the 21st century is starting out just as badly. While statistics are hard to come by, it is estimated that 170,000 Christians were killed last year worldwide, according to relief agencies and human-rights observers. Countless churches burned, clergy imprisoned, the faithful driven from their homes, beaten, raped and murdered. An additional 200 million people in 60 nations were denied freedom of worship, according to the World Evangel ical Fellowship report.

...

World Evangelical Fellowship started the prayer day in 1996 with 5,000 churches participating. Today, 100,000 U.S. churches participate with 300,000 more worldwide. But Christian persecution cannot be isolated as an issue because it is so closely tied with civil strife, racial and ethnic struggles, and political wars, notes James Kurth, Swarthmore SP College political-science professor and senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute in Philadelphia. In the past, much persecution was instigated by secular authorities and extreme totalitarians such as communists and Nazis, Kurth explains. ``You might have thought with the end of the Cold War, that would be the end of it.''

 

 

 

 

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

Headline: BIG STORES, BIG CHOICES ONLY MEAN BIG STRESSES

Monday, April 16, 2001

Section: SOUTH JERSEY

Edition: JERSEY-C

Page: B07

By Lisa B. Samalonis

BODY:

...

I am not old enough to remember the quaint general-store grocers, but when I was a girl we went to a family-run food market that consisted of 11 aisles and a deli counter. Now, in the world of mega food markets - Acme, ShopRite, Super G - you practically need a golf cart to get around. Just before I approach the checkout, I realize I have failed to get infant formula, the purpose of my trip. I do a U-turn, trek to the end of Aisle 26, and pick up the can for $22.95. ...

Barry Schwartz, professor of psychology at Swarthmore College, confirmed my suspicion that the more choices you have, the less certain you become in your decision. "Too many options can leave you paralyzed with indecision," he said. The increase in options brings an increase in expectations. Schwartz advises making choices on what is good enough instead of what would be "perfect."

 

 

The Associated Press

HEADLINE: Swarthmore students question police's handling of black student

April 14, 2001, Saturday, BC cycle

SECTION: State and Regional

LENGTH: 436 words

DATELINE: SWARTHMORE, Pa.

BODY:

Swarthmore College students criticized borough police for what they called "racialized police treatment" stemming from an assault case earlier in the week. More than 100 students silently marched through borough streets Friday afternoon, and later held a rally, to protest how a black student and his friend were questioned by police. Organizers said the incident represented a pattern of discrimination that has gone on for years.

"We need to change some procedural issues here," said Brandyn White, a sophomore from Philadelphia, who helped organize the protest. "This is something that's been pretty common over the past four years."

...

 

 

WPVI - TV
(ABC - Philadelphia)

Date: April 15, 2001

Time: 7-8AM

Station: WPVI-TV Channel 6 (ABC)

Location: Philadelphia

Program: Action News

Michele McCormack, co-anchor:

Swarthmore College students are criticizing borough police for alleged racist treatment. Students are angry at how police questioned a black student and his friend in his dorm room. Police were looking for suspects in an April ninth assault of a student who says three black men committed the crime. Police were tipped off to a student calling for a cab then went to twenty-year-old Sanjay Richards dorm room and took both Richards and a friend into the patrol car. ...

 

 

Tufts Daily

HEADLINE: Tufts U. excluded from list of 'New Ivies'

April 18, 2001

LENGTH: 890 words

BYLINE: By Nicolas Ferre, Tufts Daily

DATELINE: Medford, Mass.

BODY:

Though The Wall Street Journal omitted Tufts from its list of "New Ivies," the University has received high marks in other magazines that rank American colleges and universities. The Princeton Review recently released a revised version of its guide, The Best 331 Colleges, and Tufts received high rankings in an array of student life

and academic categories. But The Wall St. Journal's March 30 edition featured an article called "The New Safeties," which excluded Tufts from a list of schools the Journal considers to be "New Ivies."

...

These second-tier schools, dubbed the "New Ivies" by the Journal, were Williams College, Pomona College, Duke University, Georgetown University, John Hopkins University, New York University, University of Notre Dame, Vassar College, Swarthmore College, and Northwestern. Tufts was excluded from the list of rising premier schools, although its acceptance rate last year was lower than seven of the ten schools listed.

 

 

 

PR Newswire

HEADLINE: Fundraiser to Help Local Girl Scouts and YMCA Run Day Camp in Nepal

April 17, 2001, Tuesday

SECTION: STATE AND REGIONAL NEWS

DISTRIBUTION: TO CITY AND FAMILY EDITORS

LENGTH: 617 words

DATELINE: PHILADELPHIA, April 17

BODY:

Fourteen area girls, ages 15-18, including eight Girl Scouts from Girl Scouts of Southeastern Pennsylvania, are giving up part of their summer to operate a day camp for 200 children in Kathmandu, Nepal. A fundraiser to support the girls will be held on April 26, 2001, at the Mayor's Reception Room at City Hall in Philadelphia from 5:30 to 7 p.m.

Hosted by Mayor John F. Street, the evening will be filled with experiences from the Nepalese culture as well as remarks from the Nepalese Ambassador to the United Nations, His Excellency Murani Raj Sharma. Other festivities will include Nepalese-style cuisine and dancing. Raj Kapoor, a Nepalese professional dancer from New York City, has taught the girls Nepalese folk dancing. A performance by the Girl Scouts and Nepalese students from Swarthmore and Bryn Mawr colleges will take place during the evening.

 

 

The New York Times

HEADLINE: A House for a President -- And Also for a Dean

April 15, 2001, Sunday, Late Edition - Final

SECTION: Section 11; Page 6; Column 4; Real Estate Desk

LENGTH: 1130 words

BYLINE: By TRISH HALL

BODY:

...

At No. 21 is the Stuyvesant-Fish house, built in 1803 by Petrus Stuyvesant, the great-grandson of Peter Stuyvesant. Petrus gave the house to his daughter, Elizabeth, as a wedding present when she married Nicholas Fish, a Revolutionary War hero and a political ally of Alexander Hamilton. In February, George Campbell Jr. and Mary Schmidt Campbell moved in with their youngest son, Britt.

...

For 30 years, the Stuyvesant Fish house was owned by F. Phillip Geraci, an advertising executive who bought it when it was a rooming house and restored it. Deciding it was too big for him to keep, and wanting it to have an owner who would appreciate it, he offered it as a gift to Cooper Union, the college of art and engineering down the street. The college decided to use it as housing for its president. George Campbell, who became president of the college last summer after more than a decade at Bell Labs and then 10 years as president of the National Action Council for Minorities, is the first Cooper Union president to live there.

...

They have three sons -- Garikai, 30, is a professor of mathematics at Swarthmore, and Sekou, 24, is in graduate school at Columbia studying acting -- and when their children were younger, they would take them on trips to the artists' studios, to engage them in the process of collecting.

 

 

 

AScribe Newswire

HEADLINE: Bates College Student Named Harry S. Truman Scholar

April 13, 2001 Friday

LENGTH: 575 words

BODY:

LEWISTON, Maine, April 13 -- Bates College junior Jason Surdukowski of Concord, N.H., has been named a 2001 Harry S. Truman Scholar, one of 70 students from 51 U.S. colleges and universities who have been elected by 15 independent panels on the basis of leadership potential, intellectual ability and the likelihood of "making a difference."

...

An art critic for The Bates Student, the campus newspaper, and president of The Representative Assembly, Bates' student government, Surdukowski is planning a senior thesis that relates the discourse of law to the reality of genocide. A show of his work that raises awareness about human rights issues will be traveling to Amherst and Swarthmore colleges this year.

 

 

The Augusta Chronicle

HEADLINE: MOST VERSATILE STUDENT STANDS OUT FROM CROWD

March 29, 2001 Thursday, ALL EDITIONS

SECTION: METRO, Pg. C07

LENGTH: 563 words

BYLINE: Justin Martin; Staff Writer

BODY:

When Alexander "Xan" Fishman was young, he told his kindergarten teacher that when he grew up he wanted to be, well, a comic book character. ... Luckily, no one is holding Mr. Fishman to his childhood ambitions, and considering that he recently became the first student at John S. Davidson Fine Arts Magnet School to get a perfect 1600 on his SAT, he doesn't have to worry about his kindergarten teacher; he can pretty much be anything he wants.

...

Mr. Fishman hasn't decided where he wants to go to college. He has been accepted at the University of Georgia, Washington University in St. Louis and Swarthmore. He's waiting to hear from Amherst College.

 

 

Chattanooga Times / Chattanooga Free Press

HEADLINE: The question of individual rights in education

April 15, 2001, Sunday

SECTION: PERSPECTIVE; Pg. F2

LENGTH: 853 words

BYLINE: William F. Buckley Jr.

BODY:

...

"At Wake Forest University last fall," he wrote for Reason magazine, "one of the few events designated as 'mandatory' for freshman orientation was attendance at "Blue Eyed," a filmed racism-awareness workshop in which whites are abused, ridiculed, made to fail and taught helpless passivity so that they can identify with 'a person of color for a day.' "

Swarthmore edges out Wake Forest. There, in the fall of 1998, "first-year students were asked to line up by skin color, from lightest to darkest, and to step forward and talk about how they felt concerning their place in that line." And this kind of thing is not eccentric.

 

 

 

The Washington Times

HEADLINE: Recall on campus

April 13, 2001, Friday, Final Edition

SECTION: PART A; COMMENTARY; Pg. A17

LENGTH: 859 words

BYLINE: William Buckley Jr.

BODY:

...

Swarthmore edges out Wake Forest. There, in the fall of 1998, "first-year students were asked to line up by skin color, from lightest to darkest, and to step forward and talk about how they felt concerning their place in that line."

 

 

ALUMNI

THE CINCINNATI POST

Headline: DEATHS - C. JANET NEWMAN, DEDICATED TO CHILDREN

Saturday, April 14, 2001

Section: NEWS

Edition: FINAL - Page: 13A

BODY:

Dr. C. Janet Newman of Hyde Park loved children so much she dedicated her career and home to them. The former University of Cincinnati professor of Child Psychiatry and Psychoanalysis died Thursday at age 76.

She raised her three children on her own after her husband, Dr. Sam Newman, died in 1961 of cancer. She filled albums with photos of her children and grandchildren and hung photos of them on the walls of every room in her house. She collected their writings and art and individualized store-bought cards with drawings or special thanks and comments.

An avid reader who wrote poetry, loved travel and played the piano, she was born in Boston but grew up in Switzerland while her State Department father served in the League of Nations. She finished her undergraduate education at Swarthmore College in three years so she could get an earlier start at Cornell Medical School. ...

 

 

 

PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS

Headline: P.D.Q. BACH (AKA) PETER SCHICKELE PERFORMS WITH THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA

Monday, April 16, 2001

Section: FEATURES

Edition: 4STAR - Page: 38

by Tom Di Nardo Daily News Classical Music Writer

BODY:

PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA, Rossen Milanov conducting; with Peter Schickele (P.D.Q. Bach), soprano Michele Eaton and tenor David Dusing. 8 p.m. tomorrow at the Academy of Music. Tickets: $14-$75. For more information, call 215-893-1939.

After 36 years of making audiences roar with laughter, people are finally taking Peter Schickele seriously enough for him to reach his ideal career balance. Despite the enormous success of his hilarious alter ego P.D.Q. Bach, the supremely ungifted and possibly imaginary son of J.S. Bach, Schickele gave P.D.Q. a 10-year hiatus (except for an annual sold-out Carnegie Hall concert).

...

"I'm getting too old to make my entrance off the balcony or jumping from the boxes, but I guarantee I am going to make an entrance no one has ever seen in Philly!" promised Schickele, who attended Swarthmore, studied composition with the revered Vincent Persichetti, and was influenced by the great players in the Spike Jones Orchestra. "Musicians seem to enjoy P.D.Q. because they recognize it as a satire of love, a tribute to composers I admire."

 

 

SPORTS

INTELLIGENCER JOURNAL
(LANCASTER, PA.)

HEADLINE: COLLEGES

April 12, 2001, Thursday

SECTION: SPORTS, Pg. D-5, SPORTS DIGEST

LENGTH: 191 words

BODY:

...

Franklin & Marshall senior Greg Ivry and sophomore Jon Singer scored three goals apiece, and sophomore Beau Smith had three assists in the Diplomats' 14-6 Centennial Conference victory Wednesday over host Swarthmore.

 

 

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

Headline: JUNIOR'S UNEXPECTED STRONG PLAY KEEPS RIDLEY FROM REELING

Thursday, April 12, 2001

Section: NEIGHBORS SPORTS WEST

Edition: WEST - Page: B11

By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF

...

Welcome back. Basketball, football, lacrosse. Bring it on, says Chris Bell. After coaching boys' lacrosse for two seasons at Sun Valley, Bell took a year off to coach defensive ends for Swarthmore College's football team. He also had coached high school basketball for two years but decided lacrosse and football were his real loves.

...

The decision to eliminate football at Swarthmore this year may have helped Sun Valley's lacrosse team. Bell is back for his third season, leading a young Vanguards team.

"There's a good chance I could have gone full-time [as a coach at Swarthmore]," he said. "There had always been talk [about the program being eliminated]. We just never thought it would happen that soon."