From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and on to James Webb Space Telescope

John Mather, co-recipient of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics, spoke at this year's Family and Friends Weekend. Listen to him tell the story of how we got here, how the universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history.

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John Mather, co-recipient of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics, spoke at this year's Family and Friends Weekend. Listen to him tell the story of how we got here, how the universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history. Mather was project scientist for NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which measured the spectrum (the color) of the heat radiation from the Big Bang, discovered hot and cold spots in that radiation, and hunted for the first objects that formed after the great explosion. In this talk he also shares NASA's plans for the James Webb Space Telescope, which is scheduled to launch in 2014.