Swarthmore College Peace Collection

Movement for a New Society Records, 1971-1988

Collection: DG 154


Contact Information
Swarthmore College Peace Collection
500 College Avenue
Swarthmore, PA 19081-1399
U.S.A.
Telephone: 610-328-8557 (curator)
Fax: 610-690-5728
Email: wchmiel@swarthmore.edu (curator)
URL: http://www.swarthmore.edu/Library/peace/

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The following, separated by lines, represent oversized documents -- words written on large paper in magic marker; they are in no order; the originals have been discarded. See also some charts that were removed to the Oversized Items Collection: Documents.
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IMPORTANT POINTS IN THE HISTORY OF THE LONG-TERM TRAINING PROGRAM
June 1973 Training Organizing Collective (TOC) formed
Fall 1973 Cycle 1 starts; TOC members participant/coordinators
Fall 1974 Cycle 2 starts; TOC members coordinate; don’t participate
Fall 1975 Cycle 3 starts; TOX asked Life Center about a winter cyle, but not enough participants
Spring 1976 TOC has clearness & decides to call program “9 month” rather than “2 year”
Fall 1976 Cycle 4 starts
Summer 1977 TOC decides to hre coordinators, & TOC drops to one person
Fall 1977 Cycle 5 starts; first cycle with coordinators & more intense pace
Feb. 1978 Cycle 6 starts; first winter cycle
Oct. 1978 Cycle 7 starts; first cycle to do cost sharing

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SOME HIGH POINTS OF POLITICAL ACTIVITY BY TP CYCLES
Spring 1975 Cycles 2 people start PNAG; subsequent cycles keep it going
Fall 1976 Cycle 4 people do most marshalling for D.C. culmination of Continental Walk
Spring 1977 Cycle 4 at Seabrook
Fall 1977 Cycle 5 has strong nukes demonstration, important in start of Keystone
Spring 1978 Cycle 6 at Barnwell
Fall 1978 Cycle 7 does most of Philly Karen Silkwood demonstration
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PEOPLE FROM EARLY CYCLES WHO ARE HERE AND ACTIVE
Cycle 1
- Bob Irwin (PMAC)
-Sandra Boston (P.E.T.)
-Florence Rosoff (WOW)
Cycle 2
- Judy Ashof
Cycle 3
- Martha Evans 8 [in circle]!
-Johanna Matthews
Cycle 4
- Linda Nunes-Schrag (PNAG)
-Kent Larabee
-Amy Kietzman
-David Tatgenhorst
Cycle 5
- Betsy Wright (Keystone)
-Pat Hoyt (WCSG)
__________________________________________________________________________________
 
SOCIODRAMA DEMONSTRATION
A kind of demonstration which reduces a social change problem and its solution to a picture, which tells the story without the need for verbal explanations.
Elements
1. Dilemma for opponent
ex. black voter registration\
2. A picture
ex. strikes, boycott [with arrow pointing to #1 example]
3. A formula for constructing an effective picture
__________________________________________________________________________________
 
FUNCTIONS OF AFFINITY GROUPS
1. Emotional support
2. Morale: fund, courage
3. Useful part of larger structure, especially for decision-making
4. Belongingness
5. Self-marshaling / provocateur control
6. Skills sharing / physical support
7. Answer questions

 
ADDITIONAL FUNCTIONS OF CYCLE 6 GROUP AT BARNWELL
1. Training skills sharing
2. Task group
3. Living community
4. Demonstration think tank: fresh perspective from outside Palmetto
__________________________________________________________________________________
 
REFLECTIONS ON DEMO TASK ROLES
1. Which part of it was actually the most time consuming? challenging?
2. What were major problems?
3. What ideas, skills, attitudes, etc. helped you overcome problems?
__________________________________________________________________________________
 
AN INVOLVEMENT PICTURE DEMONSTRATION SHOULD TRY TO PORTRAY
1. Violation of a widely-held belief
2. Reveal societal secrets
3. Expose societal myths accompanying the secrets
4. Show our alternatives
5. Show our short & long-range goals
6. And create a dilemma for the authorities/opponent
__________________________________________________________________________________  
DIRECTION ACTION
5 [mins.] Introductions
5 [mins.] Agenda review
15 [mins.] What’s non V.D. Act
- description
- steps to action
- list of actions
10 [mins.] Keystone Alliance
- actions
10 [mins.] Pairing / Sharing
10 [mins.] PNAG / On Action
30 [mins.] Exercise in Group
- building an NVDA
---* 5. explanation
---* 15. plan scenario
---* 10. report back
5 [mins.] Evaluation & Closing
______________
120 [mins.]

__________________________________________________________________________________
 

DAY 1
1. Meditation (7:00-7:15)
2. Part-time job (8:00-3:00)
3. “Buddy”get-together (4:00-5:30)
4. Collective meeting (7:30-10:00)

 
DAY 2
1. Clearness (9:00-12:00)
2. Co-op job (2:00-4:00)
3. Cook dinner
4. R.C. class (7:30-10:00)
 

DAY 3
1. House work day (10:00-3:00)
2. Child care (4:00-7:00)
3. Conflict resolution (8:00-10:00)
4. Work from collective
 

DAY 4
1. Part-time work (8:30-1:00)
2. Meeting new people (2:00-4:00)
3. Potluck dinner with I.D. Support Group
4. P.E.T. class (7:30-10:00)
 

DAY 5
1. Breakfast meeting
2. House chores
3. Trip to thrift shop
4. Arrange for child care
5. Prepare for a workshop
6. R.C. session, followed by ice cream

 
DAY 6
1. Work (8:30-2:30)
2. Deal with mail (MNS)
3. Write an article
4. Presentation
5. Movie on t.v.

 
DAY 7
1. Church or meeting for worship
2. Movie with friends
3. House meeting featuring estimation / self-estimation
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POINTS OF DEBATE
1. Being a model & spreading the model as a priority
- model is good & we should share it
- versus model needs perfecting before we share it
2. Are proposals to act going to be productive without more knowledge?
- get the knowledge by acting
- versus get the knowledge by study
3. Lifestyle / commune; internal / tr. versus outside pol. work
14 & 9

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WHAT FORCES OR FACTORS WOULD MAKE IT LIKELY OR UNLIKELY THAT A SOCIETY WITH A DECENTRALIZED OR STATE / SOCIALIST ECONOMY WOULD BE ABLE TO SATISFACTORILY MEET THE REAL HUMAN NEEDS OF ITS PEOPLE IN THE LONG RUN?
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10 STRATEGY DILEMMAS AND PROPOSED RESOLUTIONS GEORGE LAKEY
Dilemmas
1. Waging the revolution vs. living it [proposed resolution: action communities]
2. Focus on grass-roots level action, vs. national or transnational [proposed resolution: national or transnational network of groups, with an overlapping “division of labor”]
3. Decentralization vs. hierarchical national organization [proposed resolution: mutual aid to member groups in network during crisis]
4. Common life and workstyle vs. cross-class and race organizing [proposed resolution: focus on actions with cross class and/or race support; e.g. Larzac, Rhodesian or South African goods]
5. Opposition to bureaucracy vs. effectiveness of division of labor [proposed resolution: small groups, teams]
6. Action vs. analysis and contemplation [proposed resolution: action communities (with some time for reflection)]
7. Reform vs. revolution [proposed resolution: revolutionary reforms]
8. Focus on a single issues vs. focus on multiple issues [proposed resolution: same as #2]
9. Collectivism vs. individualism [proposed resolution: small groups]
10. Articulation by leaders vs. the people speaking [proposed resolution: small groups training, avoid organizing around personalities (therefore not electoral politics)]

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DIFFERENT POSSIBLE FOCUSES OF A VISION GALLERY [Wed. 19., A.M., 2 nd group]
I. Society level: what is my vision of a good society?
---A. General high points
---B. Specific focus: structure of economy, form of government, food production and distribution,
education, child-breaking and family structure, transportation, housing, anything else
II. Community / town level
---A. Two possible time focuses
-------1.- open-ended
-------2.- what would my town look like 10 years from now if lots of good changes
kept happening?
---B. Same choice of area focuses as above in society-level
---C. Possible personal focus: what would my life, or even a day in it, look like in this community?
 

VISIONS & VISION GALLERIES
I. What do vision galleries? Because we’re all shut down by “reality.”
II. What have a visionary dimension to our social change thinking and action?
---A. For Ourselves
-------1. Give us something to build our strategy around.
-------2. Gives us motivation and drive for a long-range struggle.
-------3. When translated into short-range goals:
------------* gives us something concrete to judge our progress by
------------* with MNS perspective of “living the revolution now” gives us something
to build our daily lives on
-------4. Helps us put short-range victories and defeats in perspective... anti-war movement.
-------5. Keeps us growing as whole human beings now . . . not just “after the revolution.”
---B. For Others
-------1. Change is frightening; people need to see concrete alternatives before they’ll leap.
-------2. People in general, and other movement groups, will see us as more believeable if we
have a genearl picture and some concrete guideposts of where we’re going.
-------3. The federal government, the Pentagon, and the big corporations have their vision
of where the U.S. should go; we need to have ours thought out, too.
__________________________________________________________________________________  
 
STAGES IN A NONVIOLENT ACTION CAMPAIGN
1. Training and preparation
2. Research and fact-finding
3. Negotiations
4. Public education and the winning of allies
5. Organization
6. Issuing ultimatums: intentions
7. Direct action

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WORKSHOP ON THE THEORY OF NONVIOLENT ACTION

Nunes-Schrag
Proposed Agenda
10 [mins.] Goals and agenda review
35 [mins.] Rap on nonviolent action theory
- what it is and is not
- its mechanisms
- its methods
5 [mins.] Questions
55 [mins.] “The Controversies”
---5 [mins.] Explanation, break into groups
---40 [mins.] Do it
10 [mins.] Break
---10 [mins.] Share insights
10 [mins.] Rap on some historical examples of nonviolent action
5-10 [mins.] Nonviolent action in the world.
35 [mins.] Strategy exercise
---5 [mins.] Explanation
---3 [mins.] Divide into groups
---15 [mins.] Do it
---10 [mins.] Share in large group
10 [mins.] Brainstorm about onviolence in the new society
5 [mins.] Resources
5 [mins.] Evaluation
__________________________________________________________________________________  
 
NON-VIOLENT ACTION THEORY
Nunes-Schrag
I. What It’s Not
---1. Not passive
---2. Doesn’t reject conflict and emotions
---3. Doesn’t require pacifism
---4. Doesn’t require a friendly democratic regime to be successful
---5. Doesn’t necessarily require changing opponents’ minds
---6. Doesn’t depend on pacific ethic
II. Gene Sharp’s Theory of Power
--- All government is based on consent, obedience and cooperation of the governed
-------* example #1: Germany - 1920 - Kapp Putsch
-------* example #2: El Salvador & Guatemala - 1944
III. Gene Sharp’s Categorization of Methods of Nonviolent Action
---1. Protest & persuasion
---2. Social non-cooperation
---3. Economic non-cooperation
---4. Political non-cooperation
---5. Non-violent intervention
IV. Mechanisms of non-violent action: why it succeeds
---1. Conversion
---2. Accomodation
---3. Coercion

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FOUR DEFINITIONS OF NONVIOLENT ACTION
Nunes-Schrag
1. A means of resolving conflict and effecting reconciliation
2. A technique for waging conflict efficiently, with as little damage as possible to the human person and personality.
3. A method of wielding social, political, and economic power.
4. A way in which people discover their social power.
__________________________________________________________________________________  
 
TYPES OF PRINCIPLED NONVIOLENCE
1. Non-Resistance: Mennonites, Amish
2. Active Reconciliation: Quakers
3. Moral Resistance: Fellowship of Reconciliation
4. Selective Nonviolence: international socialists
5. Satyagraha: Gandhi
6. Nonviolent Revolution
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NON-VIOLENCE THEORY 11/17 AGENDA
10 [mins.] Excitements, gathering
5 [mins.] Agenda review and goals
10 [mins.] Pairs: what does nonviolence mean to you?
30 [mins.] Small groups: what questions and misgivings do you have about nonviolence? What do you see as its main strengths?
10 [mins.] Small groups reporting back: major questions, major strengths, discussion topics
10 [mins.] Break
3 [mins.] Announcements
20 [mins.]
---3. Perspectives on nonviolence
---5. Nancy
---5. Paul
---5. Eleanora
30 [mins.] Discussion groups
10 [mins.] Reporting back key insights
10 [mins.] Brainstorming and ideas for next N.V. Theory Workshop
5 [mins.] Evaluation
______
150 [mins.]
__________________________________________________________________________________  

METHODS OF NONVIOLENT ACTIONS
Statements
Petition
Posters
Leaflets
Media
Deputation
Mock Elections
Symbolic Act
Haunt Officials
Vigils
Plays and Music
Skits
Marches
Motorcades
Protest Meeting
Teach-Ins
Walk-Outs
Lobbying
Boycotts: People, Events, Institutions
Collective Disappearance
Strikes: Selective, General, Slow Down
All Report Sick
Economic Shutdown
Sit Down
Non-Obedience
Slow Compliance
Civil Disobedience
Block Line of Command
Deliberate Inefficiency
Mutiny
Sever Relations
Expulsion
The Fast
Sit-In
Wade-In
Pray-In
Obstruction
Occupation
Overload Facilities
Guerilla Theater
Reverse Strike
Alternative Institution
Alternative Markets
Overload Administration
Seek Prison
Alternative Prison
Stall-In
Literature
Advocating Resistance
Resign
Picketing
Mock Funerals
Mock Awards
Renounce Honors
Turn One’s Back
__________________________________________________________________________________
 
NON-VIOLENT DIRECT ACTION THEORY – PROPOSED AGENDA
10 [mins.] Gathering
5 [mins.] Agenda revue
10 [mins.] Pairs
25 [mins.] Rap on nonviolent action theory
---1. what it’s not
---2. sharp
5 [mins.] Questions
10 [mins.] Break
90 [mins.] The controversies
5 [mins.] Resources
5 [mins.] Evaluation
_____
165 [mins.]
__________________________________________________________________________________  
 
SOME HISTORICAL EXAMPLES OF NONVIOLENT ACTION
1. Roman plebeians, 5 th Century B.C.
2. South Africa, 1906-1914
3. Brazil, 1910
4. Woman’s Party, U.S., 1917
5. India, 1921-1947
6. Norway, 1942
7. El Salvador, 1944
8. Civil rights movements, U.S., 1955-1965
9. United Farm Workers, 1965 – to date
10. Vietnam War, U.S. and elsewhere, 1964-1975
11. Pakistan blockade, U.S., 1971
12. AQAG – Chemical-Biological Warfare Campaign, U.S., 1970
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SOME HISTORICAL EXAMPLES OF NON-VIOLENT ACTION
1. Lysistratic non action, Iroquois women, 17 th Century
2. Norway, 1942
3. Berlin, 1943
4. India, 1921-1947
5. Woman’s Party, U.S., 1917
6. Bhoodan movement, India, 1950s – to date
7. Civil rights movement, U.S., 1955-1965
8. Vietnam War, U.S. and many other places, 1963-1975
9. Rhodesia, 1963
10. Pakistan blockade, Phila., 1971
11. United Farm Workers, California, early 1960s - to date
12. Shah’s overthrow, Iran, 1978
13. Soweto uprising, South Africa, 1976
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SOME THOUGHTS ABOUT NON-VIOLENT DIRECT ACTION
1. It’s not passive or inactive
2. Truth-seeking as important goal; no one has it all
3. A policy of non-injury toward opponents: physically, verbally, and mentally
4. Acceptance of suffering
5. Compatibility of means and ends
6. Policy of openness toward all
__________________________________________________________________________________
 
DISCUSSION GROUPS POSSIBLE TOPICS
2. Issues of means and ends
5. Relating to 3 rd world liberation movements / nonviolence in oppressive regimes
2. Applying nonviolence in demos:; who to boo; relating to individuals and institutions
7. Nonviolence in daily life; kids, street, schools, how to not be a victim
9. Nonviolence and feminism
6. Nonviolence as strategy for structural social change
-. Evaluation
11/17 Nonviolence Workshop
Small group discussion
One way sharing from folks
Sense of thinking on the frontiers
Shared experience of perspective from a few peoples and variety of that
Design of workshop
Enabled a lot of thinking
Feeling to come out back and forth on same topic
Balance between personal and theoretical
Men and women changing groups
Way question was posed enabled free flow
Pairs helpful
Way of choosing groups
Keep to time schedule
List off controversies from outside group
Different groups in different rooms
Distraction of lots of people when in pairs
Short readings that might be useful before next session
__________________________________________________________________________________  

CAMPAIGN BUILDING
I. Overall action steps in a nonviolent action campaign
---a. Analysis and fact finding
---b. Exhausting all normal channels
---c. Negotiations
---d. Public education
---e. Training
---f. Special appeals
---g. Sacrificial acts
---h. Ultimatum
---i. Nonviolent direct action: socio-drama demonstration
II. Some major dimensions of analysis (step 1)
---a. Specific concern: the issue should be “important, timely, repeatable, and with a ‘handle’.”
---b. Research and analysis
---c. Moral basis: “what widely held moral and ethical values are being violated?”
---d. Short range goals: “capable of being clearly understood, and within the power of the opponent to yield.” [revolutionary and not reformist reforms]
---e. Medium and long range goals
---f. Societal secrets and societal myths
---g. Alternatives
---h. Constructive program
---i. Demands (short range goals)
III. Some major dimensions of a socio-drama demonstration (step 9)
---a. Reduce analysis to picture
---b. Select immediate targets
---c. Choose a “battlefield” (demonstration location)
---d. Make actions dramatic with crises
---e. Repeat actions and crises over a period of time
---f. Give everyone a role to play
---g. One story a day
---h. Repeatable elsewhere _______________________________________________________________________________________

1. WHAT WAS THE MOST ENCOURAGING THING IN SCOIAL CHANGE FOR ME IN THE PAST YEAR?
2. What’s the main thing holding back social change?
3. What can I do in my life to change that?
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
MINI – MACRO AGENDA
5 [mins.] Agenda review
15 [mins.] Introductions of us
5 [mins.] Introduction to the session
5 [mins.] Giving out readings
20 [mins.] Reading articles
30 [mins.] Reports and discussion – first 3 (5 min. report; 5 min. discussion)
10 [mins.] Break
40 [mins.] Reports and discussion - last 4
15 [mins.] Relating to social change
10 [mins.] Starting a seminar at home, questions
5 [mins.] Evaluations
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
I. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS / NETWORKS
---a. International Fellowship of Reconciliation
---b. European Workgroup of IFOR
---c. War Resisters International
---d. Green Peace
---e. Pax Christi
---f. Gandhi Peace Foundation / Shanti Sena
---g. Servicio Liberadora Para Americana Latina
---h. Women International League for Peace and Freedom
---i. World Council of Churches
---j. Movement for a New Society
---k. Civilian defense and peace researchers
---l. Peace News
---m. Grassroots revolution
II. Action Issues
---a. French nuclear tests
---b. Larzac
---c. Conscientious objection
---d. Indochina
---e. Korea
---f. Namibia, Southern Africa
---g. UFWOC
---h. Nuclear power
---i. Hunger, unemployment, housing
---j. Lead plant in Rhine Valley
III. Issues of Controversy
---a. Nonviolent revolution vs. strict anti-militarism vs. Marxist revolution
---b. How much support for nonviolent liberation movements, if any? what kinds of support?
---c. De-development vs. economic growth
---d. Religious orientation vs. non-religious
__________________________________________
_____________________________________________
 
NONVIOLENT ACTION IN THE WORLD (NUNES-SCHRAG)
Organizations
1. International Fellowship of Reconciliation2. War Resisters’ International
3. Friends of the Earth
4. Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom
5. Pax Christi
6. Order of Japanese Buddhist Monks
7. Campaign Against the Arms Trade – England
8. British Withdrawal form Northern Ireland Campaign
9. Community of the Peace People – Northern Ireland
10. Gandhi Peace Foundation / Bhoodan Movement / Sarvodaya – India
11. London Peace Diary ’79 Lists 40 + International Nonviolent Organizations, and Organizations in 90 Countries
Actions
1. New Zealand blockade of American nuclear ships
2. Campaigns against nuclear arms, arms trade
3. Anti-nuke movement – Germany, France, Japan, Canada, others
4. Revolt against Shah of Iran – general strikes, noncooperation
5. Boycott of South African Fruit - Holland
6. Boycott of South African athletes – widespread

_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
QUESTIONS
Project of Campaign Issues:
1. What are your goals?
2. What working groups will you campaign or project have? – e.g, research, liaison with other groups
3. What broader vision does your campaign or project fit into?
4. What will be your relationship with other groups?
5. What constituency of people will make your campaign or project happen, and how?
Support Community Issues:
1. How will you relate to your immediate neighborhood and to the wider community?
2. What high priority personal needs of community members will have to be met?
3. How will you keep the community going during times when project or campaign demands lots of energy?
4. How will you provide support for people working on the project but not living in community?
5. How will the community grow over the 2 years in size, nature?
__________________________________________________________
_____________________________
 
CAMPAIGN STRATEGY TASK GROUP:
1. What working groups will your campaign have? (e.g. research, press, liaison with other groups?)
2. What are your campaign goals?
3. What broader vision does your campaign fit into?
4. What will be your relationship with other groups?
5. What constituency of folks will make your campaign happen, and how will you recruit them?

_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
CAMPAIGN SUPPORT COMMUNITY TASK GROUP
1. How will you relate to your immediate neighborhood and to the wider community?
2. What high priority personal needs of community members will have to be met?
3. How will you provide support for those connected to the campaign but not living in community?
4. How will you keep the community going during “crunch” times in the campaign? List issues of concern in this area and attempt some quick solutions.
5. How will the community grow over the 2 years in size and nature?
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
PROPOSED AGENDA
Building Community Simulation
5 [mins.] Light and lively
10 [mins.] Agenda review
10 [mins.] Review scenario
5 [mins.] Think about individual questions
30 [mins.] Share responses in whole group – 3 mins. each
5 [mins.] Brainstorm possible projects
5 [mins.] Choose project
3 [mins.] Explain task groups
3 [mins.] Break into task groups
Break----------------------------------------
60 [mins.] Develop time lines
20 [mins.] Share time lines and report insights
10 [mins.] Evaluations
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
SMALL GROUP AGENDA
5-10 [mins.]. Scenario reading and agenda review
5 [mins.]. Think about individual questions
21-24 [mins.]. Share on individual questions
5 [mins.]. Brainstorm possible projects
2 [mins.]. Choose a project
3 [mins.]. Explanation of task groups
3 [mins.]. Break into “Campaign Strategy Task Group” and “Campaign Support Community Task Group”
10 [mins.]. Break
50 [mins.]. Develop time lines – make use of task group questions
10 [mins.]. Share time lines and reports
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
1. What’s your name, and where are you from?
2. What kind of things have you been doing recently, including social change things?
3. What’s something exciting that happened to you on your way here?
4. What’s one thing you’re especially looking forward to learning here?
5. What’s something you really like to do?
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
POSSIBLE QUESTIONS [cycle 6, 1/8/1978]
1. What’s something no one knows about you?
2. What was a turning point in your life that made it likely you’d come here
OR
3. When did you first realize something was seriously wrong with your society?
4. What about the life center / MNS makes you apprehensive or nervous about being here?
5. What strengths do you bring to cycle 6?
6. How do you feel now in this group?
7. Personal interests?
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
EVOLUTION OF MNS POLITICS
I. Experience and backgrounds of early activists
---a. Anti-war movement
---b. Civil rights movement
---c. Community organizing
---d. Ecology movement
II. Disillusionment with structure and content of liberal social change groups
---a. Hierarchy
---b. Financial policies
---c. Single-issue / narrowness
---d. Sexism
---e. Burnout / support
III. Vehicles
---a. Articles, papers, books, and macro and other study groups
_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
HOW MNS POLITICS EVOLVES NOW:
1. Theory work groups
2. Collective papers
3. Individual papers
4. Articles in Dandelion and Wine
5. Concerns raised in collective clearnesses
5.5 Revision of packet
PHILLY:
6. Strategy group
7. Forums
8. Conversations
9. Local network meeting discussion
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
MAIN POINTS OF MNS POLITICS
1. Emphasis on training
2. Nonviolence
---A. Direct action and campaigns
---B. Conflict resolution
---C. In means / ends
------1. Group process and dynamics
3. Emphasis on personal growth: empowerment, est-self-est, R.C. whole person exc.
4. Emphasis on support, fighting burnout – community
5. Emphasis on vision
6. Emphasis on hopefulness
7. Analysis
---A. Anti-Capitalist
---B. Ecological and De-Development
---C. Feminist
8. Vision
---A. De-Centralist
---B. Ecological
---C. Empowerment; anti-isms; personal growth
9. Strategy
---A. Catalyst not vanguard
---B. Non-hierarchical structure
---C. Non-violent action
---D. Influence other movements, e.g., nukes, food and hunger, peace conversion

_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
POLITICS OF MNS PROPOSED AGENDA
3 [mins.]. Song
5 [mins.]. Agenda Review
5 [mins.]. Intro Rap
--- Our Goals
--- Thinking about politics
--- The list
--- Dialogue with the left exercise
10 [mins.]. Pairs: What do you find exciting and positive about MNS? What do you have questions / doubts about, or what to learn more about?
20 [mins.]. Some Raps:
---5 [mins.]. How MNS politics evolved
---3 [mins.]. How they’re intended to evolve from now
---10 [mins.]. Main points of MNS politics
10 [mins.]. Brainstorm: political controversies in MNS now
5 [mins.]. Select controversies and break into groups
15 [mins.]. Small groups on controversies
15 [mins.]. Small groups on controversies
5 [mins.]. Key insights: report to large group
10 [mins.]. Break
5 [mins.]. Rap on MNS and the left
20 [mins.]. Dialogue on MNS and the left exercise
5 [mins.]. Key insights: Report to large group
5 [mins.]. Brainstorm further workshops in this area
2 [mins.]. Resources for further learning
5 [mins.]. Evaluation
Song
________
155 Excitement-Packed minutes!
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
POLITICS OF MNS
10 [mins.]. Gathering
5 [mins.]. Agenda review
5 [mins.]. Workshop goals, introduction
10 [mins.]. Pairs: getting into the subject
30 [mins.]. Main points of MNS politics and questions
5 [mins.]. Light and lively
4-5 [mins.]. Discussion groups
10 [mins.]. Break
15 [mins.]. Growing edges
5 [mins.]. Light and lively
10 [mins.]. Pairs: absorbing it!
10 [mins.]. Insights
5 [mins.]. Literature
5 [mins.]. Follow-up
5 [mins.]. Evaluation
5 [mins.]. Closing
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
MNS AND OTHER GROUPS: SOME EXAMPLES
1. Nukes movement; Clamshell
2. Women’s movement: collectives, training, conferences, articles, papers
3. Third World: PNAG; Transnational Collective; Wounded Knee
4. F.O.R. / W.R.L. / W.R.I. / A.F.S.C.
5. People’s Alliance
6. Socialist Conference
7. S.W.P.
8. Coops – Minneapolis
9. Philadelphia Neighborhood: Clasp, Bridge, P.L.A.N., Graffitti, O.W.

_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
THE VISION:
I. Socialist / Communist Society:
---a. Party Line Groups
------1. RCP Revolutionary Communist Party (formerly Rev. Union)
------2. Spartacist League
------3. IS International Socialists
------4. SWP Socialist Workers Party
---b. Unorganized, unaffiliated “socialists”
---c. Marxists (unaffiliated)
II. Anarchist / Decentralized Society
---a. MNS
---b. NAM New American Movement
---c. IWW Industrial Workers of World
---d. Unaffiliated
III. ?
---a. post liberals
---b. “There’s’ got to be something better”
---c. WRL
---d. AFSC
---e. FOR
---f .PLS / ALS / GLLCAnalysis of the Problem: Capitalism is the Problem
_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
GOALS FOR WORKSHOP
1. Begin the process of political dialogue amongst us in order to
---a. Find our common ground, points of disagreement, debate
---b. Strengthen and diversify political thinking
2. Information – sharing about MNS
3. Begin / expand empowerment through increased skill in political thinking
4. General concrete directions for future workshops
_______________________________________________
________________________________________
 
NANCY
- MNS not looking at real problems
- Unrealistic to fight oppression on personal basis; is material base for sexism, etc. Wrong focus to put energy on something not changeable
- Have to change mode of production, way we produce things
- Base for new society exists in working class due to cooperative work. This makes workers revol.
- Can’t look to oppressors for change because is no material base for them to fight for change
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
JOHN
- MNS doesn’t deal with where oppressive structures are
- Can’t change governments, multi-national companies through nonviolence – they have interests they will promote
- Combined with mid-class background, nonviolence
- Not much MNS thinking about oppressive structures
- By emphasizing division with in us MNS plays into capitalist hands

_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
- Why isn’t MNS Marxist-Leninist
- Relation: MNS / Left groups campaign
- Why not more active in change, not just training
- Does MNS have common political sense
- Process for MNS take political position
- How did politics of MNS evolve
- What important political debates are in MNS
- Status of debate: and actual vs. philos Nonviolence
- What’s actual input of strategy group
- Integration of non-MNS thinking on MNS issues
- How to get transnational issues that a lot?
- How issues chosen?
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________

1.DECENTRALIZATION
---1, 10, 13, 8 Gordon, El, Paul
2.Constituency – Who organize?
3. Bread labor controversy
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
CONTROVERSIES
1. Decentralized vs. chaos
2. Who should we organize
3. Ideal comm.. vs. broader political action
4. Balance of personal and political?
5. Influence of R.C.
6. Is Nonviolence a technique or phlilos . . . relig.
7. Rigidification of early thinking and assumptions
8. Large scale decision making
9. Break labor controversy
10. Decent. vs. strat. Sense of direction
11. Decent. vs. centraliz. For sake of justice
12. Without strong theoretical long-term strat, how keep MNS from being issue-oriented?
13. How meet needs which can’t be handled by decent.
14. Leadership style
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
-GET DEEPER!
-Way to carry on
-MNS controversies not well enough known
-Jim talk slower
-Taking MNS stance when not known
-MNS in the West?
-Other left views one at a time
-Land L’s!
-Stinky marker
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
1. Helping to get people to it [sic.] involved
2. Creative use of controversy
3. Exciting to begin this dialogue and thinking
4. Potential in GP. for creative non-sterot. Thinking
5. Rap on MNS and left
6. Exc. Handling of lots of material
7. Chart on left
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
ENERGIZING AND GOOD TIMING
Nancy smiling!
Excellent large group, small group, pairs
Brilliant exposition
Rev. Relevant songs
Car wash
Future workshops
Interesting content
Good agenda
New insights
Feel more included
Intellectual vs. feeling business

_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
PAIRS: What do you find exciting and positive about MNS? What do you have questions/doubts about, or want to learn more about?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
POLITICS OF MNS AGENDA
10 [mins.]. Gathering
5 [mins.]. Agenda review
5 [mins.]. Intro/Background rap
---Workshop goals
------1. Begin and expand empowerment through increased skill in political thinking
------2. Begin the process of political dialogue among us, in order to strengthen and diversify our political thinking
------3. Information – Sharing about MNS
------4. Generate concrete directions for future training program workshops and other activities
---Political Thinking
15 [mins.]. Pairs: What are major high points and problem areas in my development as a political thinker and actor, past and present? What are next steps for me, and what do I need to make them happen?
5-10 [mins.]. Brainstorm: What’s exciting and positive about MNS?
10 [mins.]. Rap: History of MNS political thinking
10 [mins.]. Discussion groups
10 [mins.]. Large group questions and insights
10or5 [mins.]. Break or L&L
10 [mins.]. Rap: Main points of MNS politics
10 [mins.]. Discussion groups
10 [mins.]. Large group
5or10 [mins.]. L&L or Break
10 [mins.]. Rap: MNS in movement context: Relating to other groups
10 [mins.]. “Dialogue with the left”
15 [mins.]. Discussion groups
5 [mins.]. Insights in large groups
10 [mins.]. Pairs: My next step in political thinking/acting for me; What that means I need from the training program?
5 [mins.]. Brainstorm: Follow up on this workshop for the training program
5 [mins.]. Evaluation
5 [mins.]. Closing
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
POLITICAL THEORY OF MNS (ALIAS “THE POLITICS OF MNS”)
[Proposed Agenda]
5 [mins.]. Agenda review
5 [mins.]. Goals of workshop
50 [mins.]. MNS political theory
---A. Introduction
---B. Analysis
---C. Vision
---D. Strategy and its application:
------1. Overall
------2. The MNS network
------3. Some projects
10 [mins.]. Questions
10 [mins.]. Break
15 [mins.]. Problems and growing edges of MNS
10 [mins.]. Questions
40 [mins.]. Small groups
10 [mins.]. Insights
10 [mins.]. Evaluations
_________
175-180 [mins.]
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
AN OVERVIEW OF THE HISTORY, STRUCTURE, AND POLITICS OF MNS, AND THE PHILA. LIFE CENTER
Proposed Agenda
10 [mins.]. Gathering
10 [mins.]. Agenda review and goals of workshop
10 [mins.]. Pairs: What’s exciting about MNS, what do I want to know more about?
15 [mins.]. Talk:
---1. What is the Life Center, or, where am I right now?
---2. Some history of MNS
10 [mins.]. Questions
10 [mins.]. Break
20 [mins.]. Talk: What’s unique about MNS?
10 [mins.]. Questions ---------------------------5-10 [mins.]. Floating Light and Livelies
30 [mins.]. Small groups
10 [mins.]. Sharing insights
5 [mins.]. Evaluation

_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
SOME HIGH POINTS OF MNS HISTORY
1971
- MNS starts in Eugene, OR., and Philadelphia:
---A. Collectives: Printing, political education, national office, training
---B. Bangladesh blockage
---C. Trojan march
---D. Stone house and gathering start in Philadelphia
1972
- Blockage of ships taking ammunition to Vietnam
- Publication of “Revolution: A Quaker Prescription for a Sick Society” and “De-Developing the U.S. through Nonviolence.”
1973
- MNS at Wounded Knee
- Long-term training program starts
- First orientation weekends
1974
- MNS starts in Minneapolis/St. Paul
- First GTP
1975
-MNS starts in Ann Arbor
- MNS does last anti-war demo in Philly!
- First sustained anti-nuke action in Philly
- Food and Hunger as key issues
1976
- Involvement in continental walk, anti-B-1 bomber campaign
- End of coop. struggle in Minneapolis/St.Paul
1977
- MNS at Seabrook
1978
- Barnwell, Seabrook
1979
- Women Take Back Night marches; Minneapolis/St. Paul and Philadelphia
- Wall Street Action
- National Lesbian/Gay March in DC

_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
WHAT’S UNIQUE ABOUT MNS?
1. Combining of things form many kinds of groups and political traditions and perspectives
2. Trying to make all our best ideas apply to all aspects of our lives now – not just some aspects or only “after the revolution”
3.How we relate to different popular theories of change, namely:
---1. Change self to change world (simple living, human potential move, some spiritual perspective)
---2. Use the system’s rules to change it (legislation, social work, legal)
---3. Change yourself and other likeminded people as a model (alternative institutions)
---4. Grass roots consciousness-raising and organizing for direct action around peoples’ needs (MNS, some peace, some left, some ecology groups)
---5. Organize a proletarian vanguard party (some left groups)
(MNS combines #1-4)
4. Emphasizing the personal and the political
5. Emphasis on training
6. Agreement on non-violent action as strategy/method of change
7. Development of our own analysis vision and strategy
8. Our network structure
9. Emphasis on de-development
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
TINKERTOY DOG ROLES
Looker – sees original, stays in sunroom. Talks only to runner
Runner – sees neither model. Can talk to looker, builders, and feedbacker
Builders – build dog from pieces gotten from supplier. Get info from runner. Can ask feedbacker questions.
Feedbacker – can respond only to questions with “that’s right” or “that’s wrong”
Supplier – gives pieces to builders – no more than six unattached at a time

_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
LIGHT AND LIVELIES
To Stop the Train (or Nuke)
Head and Shoulders
My Bonnie
Rainstorm
Magic Blob
Pretzel
Car Wash
Pass the Mask
Pass the Motion
Great Scott (Jumping Hug)
Pruee
Waking up in the Jungle
Waddilyacha
Fixing the Ceiling
Stretch!
Rumbling Buffalo
Aardvark
Egyptian Head Roll
Adriatic Head Roll
Volcano
Machine
Elephant Palm Tree
Fire on the Mountain
A Big Wind Blows
Zip-Zap, Boing
Touch Blue
Sardine
Ha-Ha
Musical Laps
MAZOO
Knots

_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
MOVEMENT GROUP AGENDA
15 [mins.]. Prep. Planning Meeting Session Facilitated
---10 [mins.]. Agenda Review: read “Position”, review roles and choose
---5 [mins.]. Goals for negot. meeting: brainstorm: - not achievable. -hope to achieve
25 [mins.] Planning Meeting Your Own Facilitator
---- Read “issues”
---- Select “main-issues”
---- Choose positions
---- Caucus when needed
---- Think about your roles
5 [mins.] Guidelines and Feelings (session facilitator)
30 [mins.] Negotiation Meeting
_____________________________________
__________________________________________________
 
GROOP PRAWSESS II: Brung tuh ya by Molly and Jim
Pre-Pozed Agenduh:
5 [mins.]. Gathering - J
10 [mins.]. Agenda revue (with our goals) - M
10 [mins.]. Assumptions rap - J
10 [mins.]. Consensus rap - M
100 [mins.]. T T dawg with break
---10 [mins.]. Explanation - J
---5 [mins.]. Divide
---10 [mins.]. Prepare
---45 [mins.]. Do it
---10 [mins.]. Break
---20-30 [mins.]. Evaluate - M
5 [mins.]. Further Resources - J
5 [mins.]. Evaluation - ?
5 [mins.]. Closing - ? Light Gift
__________
 
150 [mins.]

_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
BALTIMORE MACRO COLLECTIVE’S “M.I.T. THEORY OF GROUPS”
A. Maintenance Needs: To hold together, support each other
---1. To improve understanding
---2. To improve communication
---3. Sense of unity
---4. Sense of sharing
---5. Awareness and development of Esprit de Corps
B. Individual Needs
---1. To belong
---2. To contribute
---3. For status
---4. For dependence
---5. For security
---6. For self-esteem
---7. To be stretched
---8. To grow
---9. For love
---10. For freedom
C. Task Needs
---1. Clarification of the problem
---2. A worthwhile and clear goal
---3. Consensus on goal
---4. Plan of action and procedures
---5. A navigator’s fix
---6. Acknowledgment of accomplishment
-In successful growing group, these needs are experienced, recognized, and met as much as possible
- No one person can meet all those needs; group functions well to extent these leadership functions are perceived and shared by all
_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
NEGOTIATION: SOME GENERAL POINTS
I. What it is
---a. Communication, face to face meeting
---b. Bargainin
II. Its Goal
---a. Main Goal: Resolve disagreement, not to created win/lose situation
------1. Critical part of a campaign
------2. Humanizes us and our opponents, breaks down stereotypes
------3. A vehicle for extricating people from bad institutions (rather than destroying the people)
---b. Other Goals
------1. Tell the press and the public
------2. “Exhaust non-direct action solutions”
------3. Give the campaign group stature and recognition
III. Why negotiations can succeed
---a. Conscience
---b. Economic pressure
---c. “rational reasoning” self-interest clarification
---d. Status/image concern of opponent
_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
CAMPAIGN NEGOTIATIONS SESSION AGENDA
5 [mins.]. Gathering
5 [mins.]. Ajentuh revue
20 [mins.]. Wraps
110 [mins.]. Role play
---10 [mins.]. ntro.
---40 [mins.]. Preparation
---30 [mins.]. Do it 5 [mins.]. Floating Break
---30 [mins.]. Debriefing
5 [mins.]. Evaluation
_______
150 [mins.].

_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
CRITERIA
1. Realistic scenario for rev. with this strategy? Contains all seeds for power shift?
2. If dependent on other strategies are they easily made?
3. Illuminate root evils, point way to rev. goals? (macro)
4. Empower? Take power from powers that be?
5. Strengthen soc. Ch. Movement
6. Get support, disarm hostility fr. Potential allies?
7. Cross class, race, sex, culture lines? Potential for mobility majority?
8. Effect guards vs. dangers of cooperative reform?
9. Good potential for internal coordination, direction
10. Inherent weaknesses in any of above?
Issues
- Risk
- Who to mobilize
- Local and slow and broad based vs. homogenous risky, etc.
_______________________________________________________________________________________

 
INSIGHTS
- Need to be able to articulate where we are
- [concentric circles]? Energy where?
- Need to know about Marxism (some emphasis on material base).
- Need to integrate these other perspectives
- Historical sources of oppression AND way oppression is felt
- Work needed in many areas
- Not contradiction between change in structure and change in ourselves. Lots of ma
_____________________________________________________________________________________
 
Rev. potential of community org. ------------------------------------IIII
Rev. vs. reformist reforms -------------------------------------------I
Examine initiative process and potential
Rev. pot. Of U.S. wage workers
Social change history ------------------------------------------------I
Read Gramsci ------------------------------------------------------II
Which sectors of fem. Strategy to embrace or challenge -------------II
Sex, race and class – strategic implications --------------------------II
History of parallel institution
Whether and how to raise radical profile
How to relate to two new radical weeklies ---------------------------I
What are preconditions for rev.? How to produce them? -------------I
Implications of class for org. (forum) ---------------------------------I
_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
Mass strikes 1900’s U.S. labor history -------------------------------I
Ruling class strategies, how to get ^ ----------------------------------II
Qs of centralization of dec. –mkg. In movement ----------------------I
How and if to organize middleclass, if any. ---------------------------II
Meeting with other thinking groups -----------------------------------I
What motivation to rely on in new society ----------------------------II
What is the basis for action, if not feelings? ---------------------------II
How to relate to the anger produced by oppression?
Economic community org. altern’s – How relevant?
Which ones? ---------------------------------------------------------I
How get from strat. To prog? ----------------------------------------IIII
Global economics (Samir Amin) --------------------------------------II
Anarchist writers
What happened in Russia and Europe ca. 1914-18 and
dynamics of transf. of soc movements to
reform or authorization?
Rethink what I already know

_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
GUIDELINE QUESTIONS FOR REPORTS:
1. What is a major social problem in my area?
2. What are some large-scale causes behind it?
3. How should the situation really look?
4. What is being done about it?
5. What more could be done about it?
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
6. What’s in the way of more being done about it?
7. How can we overcome whatever is in the way?

_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
INTRODUCTION TO MACRO-ANALYSIS
10 [mins.]. Excitement sharing
15 [mins.]. What is macro-analysis (talk and questions)
25 [mins.]. Reports and follow up
5 [mins.]. Final questions and wrap-up
5 [mins.]. Evaluation
_______________________________________________________________________________________

 
“MINI-MACRO” ON HOUSING PROPOSED AGENDA
10 [mins.]. Gathering
5 [mins.]. Agenda Revue
15 [mins.]. Raps on what macro-analysis is
5 [mins.]. Describe and distribute articles
20 [mins.]. Read articles
10 [mins.]. Break
60 [mins.]. Reports and discussion (5 mins each per report, approx)
40 [mins.]. Web chart and discussion or other follow-up
10 [mins.]. General questions and disc.
5 [mins.]. Evaluation

_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
“MINI”-MACRO WORKSHOP AGENDA
10:25-10:30 Start Morning Session Minutes
1. Brief introduction / excitement sharing 5-10
2. Agenda review 5
3. Introduction to macro-analysis and questions 15
4. Distribute and do readings 30-40
LUNCH
1:00 Gather
1. Do reports 40
---1. The worst is yet to come?
---2. Farming with petroleum and if all Chinese had wheels
---3. Stagnation is still the worst . . . and politics of zero growth
---4. Outwitting the developed countries
---5. Buddhist economics
---6. De-developing the U.S. through nonviolence
2. Discussion 20
3. Break 10
4. Personal empowerment exercise 20
5. “Problem – solution – project” 30
6. Macro-anlalysis follow up and questions 10
7. Evaluation 5-10
____________________________
___________________________________________________________
 
MINI-MACRO SEMINAR – PROPOSED AGENDA minutes
1. Self introductions 10
2. Agenda review 5
3. What is macro-analysis 15
--- The manual
--- The seminar movement
--- The Phila. macro-analysis collective
4. Give out articles 5
5. Read articles 20
6. Break 10
7. Reports and discussion
---#1 Reports, discussions, and questions on Time’s Limits to Growth 15
---#2 “Stagnation is the Worst. . . “ and “The Politics of Zero Growth” 15
---#3 Limits to Growth charts and “If all Chinese had Wheels” 15
---#4 “De-developing the U.S. through nonviolence” 15
8. Social change implications: brainstorm
---1) Problems; 2) Visions/Goals/Solutions; 3) What people might do 20-30
9. Macro seminars, movement, and contacts; How to start a seminar back home 5-10
10. Evaluation
_______________________________________________________________________________________
 

TRAINING: KINDS OF TRAINING
1. Community building
2. Consciousness raising: male and female GPS, macro-anal
3. Democratic group process, meeting facilitation
4. Conflict resolution
5. Crisis intervention
6. Non-violent direct action and campaign-building
7. N.V. civilian defense
_________________________
______________________________________________________________
 
WHY DO TRAINING?
1. First chance to learn skills necessary in a comprehensive social change movement trying to “live the revolution now”
2. Make mistakes in practice rather than in real thing
3. Makes us competent social change agents.
4. Confidence/empowerment/fights hopelessness
____________________________________________________
___________________________________
 
STRATEGY GAMES
Some ‘how to do it and why” thoughts
1. Why?
---a. Campaign planning
---b. Group dynamics
---c. New roles
---d. Excitement
---e. Non-violence
---f. Time pres.
2. Structure
---a. Rules: time limits, side negotiations, reality check
---b. Roles: teams and coordinators
---c. Scenario
---d. Kicker: the start-off
---e. Mass role play option
---f. Evaluation
3. Dynamics
---a. Activist group - powerlessness
---b. Time passage
---c. “Pushing reality”
---d. Activities of coordinators - “This is God speaking”
4. Hints for coordinators/trainers
---a. Designing teams
---b. Choosing team members
---c. Being a coordinator
_______________________________________________________________________________________
 
PROPOSED AGENDA FOR NONVIOLENCE TRAINING
5 [mins.]. Gathering and “Light & Lively”
5 [mins.]. Agenda review
5 [mins.]. Rap on nonviolence
5 [mins.]. Rap on training
5-10 [mins.]. Explanation of strategy game
10 [mins.]. Break
10 [mins.]. Teams get ready to act
50 [mins.]. Do it!
20 [mins.]. Debriefing of game
5 [mins.]. Evaluation of session

_________________________________________________________________________________

TIME LINE FOR A NON-VIOLENT DIRECT ACTION CAMPAIGN

[all entries situated, in descending order, on a vertical timeline with no numbers]
- Consciousness raised
- Concern about issue
- Commitment
- Self and empowerment
- Action/campaign idea
- Gather others
- Start core group
- Investigate
- Develop analysis/vision (resource file)
- Strategy
- Develop time line, roles, process
- Training / skill sharing
- Exhaust “normal” channels
- Negotiate
- Inform public: educate, organize! (ground work)
- Set ultimatum
- Train for actions
- Action
- Evaluate
- Repeat: negotiate, inform public, action, evaluate, negotiate . . .
- Build up
- Start campaign other places (decentralize)
- Pass on knowledge: manuals, info., training
- It’s a movement!




This file was last updated on January 13, 2010.