Swarthmore College Peace Collection

Mercedes M. Randall Papers, 1914- 1977

Collection: DG 110


Contact Information
Swarthmore College Peace Collection
500 College Avenue
Swarthmore, PA 19081- 1399
U.S.A.
Telephone: (610) 328- 8557 (Curator)
Fax: (610) 328- 8544
Email: wchmiel1@swarthmore.edu (Curator)
URL: http://www.swarthmore.edu/Library/peace/


Descriptive Summary
Repository
Swarthmore College Peace Collection
Creator
Randall, Mercedes Moritz (1895- 1977)
Title
Mercedes M. Randall Papers
Inclusive Dates
1914- 1977
Call Number
DG 110

Language of Materials
Materials in English
Extent
4 linear feet [papers only]
Abstract
Mercedes M. Randall was an early, and lifelong, member of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. She held many positions of responsibility in the organization, including chairmanship of the National Education Committee, and presidency of the Manhattan Branch. Randall was the first biographer of Nobel Peace Prize winner, Emily Greene Balch.

Administrative Information
Restrictions to Access
None
Usage Restrictions
None
Alternate Form of Material
None
Acquisitions Information
Gift of Mercedes M. Randall, Anne Ivey, Ruth Detzer, 1968- 1981 [Acc. 68A- 052]; 1970 [Acc. 70A-037] 1972 [Acc. 72A-145] 1975 [Acc.75A- 008, Acc. 75A-009, Acc. 75A-058, Acc. 75A-078]; 1976 [Acc.76A- 056, Acc. 76A-080, Acc. 76A-085]; 1977 [Acc.77A-074, Acc.77A-097, Acc.77A-098]; 1981 [Acc.81A-021]
Processing Information
Checklist prepared by Martha P. Shane, March 1985; this finding aid prepared by Chloe Lucchesi- Malone August 2009
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Mercedes M. Randall Papers (DG 110), Swarthmore College Peace Collection
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendents, as stipulated by United States copyright law

Online Catalog Headings
These and related materials may be found under the following headings in online library/archival catalogs.
See tripod record


Historical Background
Mercedes Moritz Randall, writer and peace worker, was born September 11, 1895, in Guatemala City where her father Albert Moritz was an American merchant. She received her B.A. from Barnard College in 1916 and a master's degree in history from Columbia University. She taught both English and history in New York City between 1916 and 1923. She married John Herman Randall, Jr., a professor of philosophy at Columbia, in 1922, and the couple had two sons, John Herman Randall, III, and Francis Ballard Randall, both of whom became professors. The Randalls lived at 15 Claremont Avenue in Morningside Heights, New York City, and summered in an old farmhouse in Peacham, Vermont. Mercedes Randall died on March 9, 1977, at the age of 81.

Already involved with pacifist and social concerns during World War I, Randall became a member of the Young Democracy. Colleagues in this group included Devere Allen, Frances Witherspoon and Tracy Mygatt, and these friendships endured throughout their lives. She was one of the early members of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, holding many executive offices including chairman of the National Education Committee. She was president of the Manhattan branch of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom.

Randall first met Emily Greene Balch in 1918 at a dinner in New York City sponsored by the Collegiate Anti- Militarism League. Balch was the first International Secretary of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and the two women worked closely together on many WILPF projects. Miss Balch asked Randall to be her literary executor, and, in 1964, Randall wrote a biography of Balch entitled Improper Bostonian: Emily Greene Balch. Later, in 1972, she edited Beyond Nationalism: The Social Thought of Emily Greene Balch. Randall led the campaign that resulted in Balch receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in 1946.

Randall wrote much Women's International League for Peace and Freedom material including pamphlets, reports, articles, and mailings. In 1944, she wrote a pamphlet "The Voice of Thy Brother's Blood", a plea for action to help the Jewish refugees of World War II. This was distributed by both Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and the American Jewish Committee. She and Balch together wrote the pamphlet "Highlights of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom History, 1915-1946". Other writings included the appendix to the 1945 edition of Peace and Bread by Jane Addams and the introductions to Women at the Hague by Jane Addams and Occupied Haiti by Balch. She also compiled indexes for several Women's International League for Peace and Freedom periodicals.

Her publisher, Twayne, described Randall as having "devoted herself to problems of international and interracial peace and justice." After her death in 1977, the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom periodical Peace and Freedom (April- May 1977) wrote: "Mrs. Randall believed strongly that the peace movement was historically important and that similar studies should be made of some of the other pioneer women and their early followers who showed clearly the connection between pacifism and freedom and feminism and economic change all over the world. She kept track of all such books that appeared and urged the peace leaders to write before they died so that others could have the record."

Collection Overview
The papers of Mercedes M. Randall include her research on Emily Greene Balch whose biography she wrote in 1964 as well as the book Beyond Nationalism: The Social Thought of Emily Greene Balch which she edited in 1972. Both books are in the SCPC library. There are pamphlets, articles, reports, and mailings that Randall wrote for Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, including the pamphlets "The Voice of Thy Brother's Blood" (1944) and "Highlights of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom History, 1915- 1946". Other writings include letters to the editor and the indexes of several Women's International League for Peace and Freedom periodicals.

There is correspondence with prominent peace leaders, some of whom were Women's International League for Peace and Freedom colleagues. There is also correspondence pertaining to projects in which she was involved. This includes the responses to a letter Randall sent in 1940 to representative Americans asking them to formulate "the conditions of a lasting peace," and the responses, in 1972, to a letter to pacifists of her acquaintance on "What I Believe." There is also correspondence pertaining to Balch's Nobel Peace Prize (1946). One item of correspondence is restricted at this time.

Her subject files contain articles, notes, correspondence, and other material about peace- related topics. They include two scrapbooks on World War I, information about the Young Democracy, and a large collection of pamphlets and booklets on the Jewish refugees during World War II.

Personal calendars for the years 1973 to 1976 and her obituary can also be found.

Correspondents include Emily Greene Balch, Marion Balch, Helen Beardsley, Gertrude Bussey, Sarah Cleghorn, Dorothy Detzer, Dorothy Hutchinson, A.J. Muste, Clara Ragaz, Ella White, and Frances Witherspoon.

Arrangement of Collection
The bulk of these papers was given to SCPC in 1977 by Francis B. Randall following the death of his mother Mercedes M. Randall earlier that year. Because of Mercedes Randall's research on Emily Greene Balch for two books, there was much Balch material in these papers that was sorted out and moved to DG 006 (Balch papers). The remaining papers were well organized by Randall. Her system was to use large mailing envelopes as folders with pertinent notes on the front to identify the contents. During the processing, the writing portion of these envelopes was removed and placed with its contents in new folders. These folders were then arranged together depending on the predominant kind of material inside, i.e.correspondence with an individual, related to a project,etc. There are often many kinds of material together in one folder, as Randall had collected it. The folder listings in the checklist, except in the subject files,are usually not Randall's words, but are meant to be more descriptive.

Folders simply labeled "Writing" in Series III contain single items together by decade. Series III is arranged in chronological order.

There are two subject files. The first, called the Original Order Subject File, has been left intact in alphabetical order as Randall had kept it. The second, called the Imposed Order Subject File, is a collection of folders about various topics that were found in different parts of the papers, placed together, and arranged chronologically.





Detailed Description of the Collection

Box l
Checklist
Removal sheets

SERIES I. PERSONAL
Box 1 (continued)
Obituary, newsclippings, and information about Mercedes M. Randall
Christmas cards from friends
Article by son, Francis B. Randall, and Balch booklet by husband, John Herman Randall, Jr.
Personal calendars (1973- 1976)

 
SERIES II. CORRESPONDENCE
Box 1 (continued)
With individuals
-Emily Greene Balch to Mercedes M. Randall (1942- 1960)
-Marion Balch (sister of Emily Greene Balch, 1956- 1961)
-Helen Beardsley (1974)
-Gertrude Bussey (1957)
-Sarah Cleghorn (1950- 1952)
-Dorothy Detzer (1945- 1974)
-Dorothy Hutchinson (1974)
-A.J. Muste (1945- 1965)
-Clara Ragaz (1940, 1941)
-Ella White (1961)
-Frances Witherspoon (1956- 1973)
Other correspondence
General correspondence
"International Correspondence"
With family in German (1924- 1926)
Previously restricted: Balch, Randall, Schwimmer (1943- 1946; 1958)

Box 2
Project- related correspondence
Responses to Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Peace Aim Letter (1940)
About "The Voice of Thy Brother's Blood" pamphlet (1943)
About distribution of "Voice..." pamphlet (1943,1944)
Responses to "Voice..." pamphlet (1944)
About "free ports" (1944)
About Balch Nobel Peace Prize (1946)
About support for Balch Nobel Peace Prize (1946)
About Balch research (late 1950s and early 1960s)
About Beyond Nationalism... (1968- 1972)
Responses to "What I Believe" (Women's International League for Peace and Freedom project, circa 1972)
About pamphlet "Peace and Justice without Violence" (1974)
On interview with Mildred Scott Olmsted (1974)
About editorial on hemlock trees (1974)
Between Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and Israeli section (1974- 1975)
 

SERIES III. WRITINGS BY M. M. RANDALL
Box 3
Reports on National Peace Education (1936 - 1940)
Writings (1940s)
Book proposal: War and Peace Reconsidered with correspondence (1942)
Pamphlet: "The Voice of Thy Brother's Blood" with drafts (1944)
Report on pamphlet "The Voice of Thy Brother's Blood" to Women's International League for Peace and Freedom National Board (1944)
Draft of appendix to 1945 edition of Peace and Bread by Jane Addams
Pamphlet: "Highlights of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom History, 1915 - 1946" with draft (1946)
Drafts from Women's International League for Peace and Freedom annual meeting (1948)
Writings (1950s)
Writings (1960s)
Book: Improper Bostonian - Emily Greene Balch (1964)
Writings (1970s)
Drafts: Introduction to Women at the Hague by Jane Addams (1972)
Drafts: Introduction to Occupied Haiti by E.G. Balch (1972)
Messages to Women's International League for Peace and Freedom w/correspondence (1973, 1974)
Beyond Nationalism: Social Thought of Emily Greene Balch edited by Mercedes M. Randall (1972)
"Segesta" Description of travel w/photos. (No date)


Box 4
Publicity and orders for Beyond Nationalism...
"Front materials" for Beyond Nationalism...
Drafts: Beyond Nationalism...


Box 5
Research on Emily Greene Balch
Lists of Balch materials used
Balch writings used by Mercedes M. Randall
"Balch quotations"
Other Balch research materials


SERIES IV. SUBJECT FILES
Box 6
Original order subject file (1965- 1969)
Anthropology: Armed Conflict, Science and Peace (1967)
Berne Conference; M. Fainsod on International Socialism and World War (19l5)
Black Panther Platform and Program; Black Manifesto (1968- 1969)
Black Power
Central Intelligence Agency (C.I.A.) Clippings (5) (April 1966)
Campus Violence (1969)
Civil Defense - Ryan - Women's International League for Peace and Freedom
Cold War: Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and Cold War
Books found in SCPC library
One- half box
Columbia
Columbia University (1965 - 1966)
Columbia (1967); H.A. Dean "On the New Student Nihilism"
Columbia (1968)
Columbia University andW.W.II; Articles by V. Gildersleeve, Butler
C.O.'s- old Statement by A. Moritz.
Conscientious Objection - A. Hassler "Supreme Being" (1967)
C.O. Radio Talk - M. M. Randall (very poor- historical)
Disarmament
Disarmament - Non- Proliferation Treaty (Draft)
Dominican Crisis
Draft- Card Burning
Draft- Lottery; Uptight on Draft - Peace Time Conscription
Draft: Military Training (1969- 1970)
Drugs (1968)
Greek Games, End of (1969); announcement
Human Rights - Declaration of Peace- Keeping (C.W.D.W.D.) (1965 - 1967)
R. Schwimmer - Relations to early Women's International League for Peace and Freedom history
Statements on Peace; position of scientists
Vietnam - Cruelty and Horror
Tillich, Paul; "Existential Philosophy" (Speech in 1965)
W.I.L. Congress Resolution on Disarmament
Wynner, Edith - Errors in W.I.L. History, Berne Conference
Wynner, Edith - Rosika Schwimmer
Imposed order subject file in chronological order
War Album, World War I Volume I

Box 7
War Album, World War I. Volume II.
World War I
Young Democracy (circa 1919)
Censorship of ideas in public schools (circa 1919)
Writings of Mme. Andree Jouve in Paris (1919 - 1944)
Article: "My Philadelphia" by Florence Kelley (1926)
Sacco- Vanzetti Case (1927)
World War II
Symposium: Discussion of the theory of international relations (1945)
Israel and Middle East (1945- 1974)
Booklet: "Jane Addams As I Knew Her" (194l?)
Material on Jessie Wallace Hughan
Peace literature on non- violence
U Thant (1963- 1971)
Non- violence: Gjermoe, Zenthen (Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, 1964- 1972)
Middle East (1967 - 1973)
Non- violence, general (circa 1968- 1971)
Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (1970)
Articles on Columbia University in the 1930s (written in 1970)
Violence (clippings, etc., circa 1971)
Memorials to Mark Van Doren and Rabbi Heschel (1972)

Box 8
"A Thousand Cranes" (circa 1972)
Correspondence, notes, etc. about Francis Sheehy Skeffington, Irish pacifist (1973)
Jews and Arabs in Middle East (circa 1976)
Women's International League for Peace and Freedom- related miscellaneous
Miscellaneous peace literature
Miscellaneous
Jewish Refugees in World War II material

Box 9
Jewish Refugees in World War II material

Box l0
Jewish Refugees in World War II material

 


This file was last updated on March 31, 2011.