Swarthmore College Peace Collection, 500 College Avenue, Swarthmore, PA 19081-1399, USA
 
PART III: U.S. SECTION
HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION, 1960-1999

Brief Notes on WILPF Activities
1960s
1960: Along with JAPA, raised $30,000 for U.N. to build Jane Addams Refugee House in Austria.
1961: First seminar held for Soviet and American women to meet and discuss peace and disarmament; this
was the first meeting of its kind during the Cold War.
1964: Participated in Black Sash demonstrations in support of civil rights workers in Mississippi.
1965: Fiftieth Anniversary International Congress launched world petition drive asking women to use their
power to end the armed conflict in Vietnam.
1967: Nobel Committee gives grant for WILPF fact-finding mission to the Middle East.
1967 (July): Fifty-two Branches experienced "Vietnam Summer," in which Martin Luther King Jr. had
called for 10,000 volunteers to organize and educate about Vietnam in 500 communities.
1967: Kay Camp began term as National President.
1968: Glenna Johnson began term as Executive Director.
1968 (Jan.): Jeannette Rankin led the WILPF-initiated Jeannette Rankin Brigade in lobbying Congress to
"end the war in Vietnam and begin social reconstruction at home."
1969: Sponsored "Tuesdays in Washington" to bring members to U.S. Capitol in Washington (DC) to
demonstrate against armed conflict in Vietnam.

1970s
1970: Glenna Johnson ended term as Executive Director.
1970: Along with JAPA, organized the third Women of the Americas Congress in Bogota (Columbia)
1971: International WILPF sent six women to North and South Vietnam, including Kay Camp.
1971: Dorothy Steffens began term as Executive Director.
1971: Kay Camp ended term as National President.
1971-1976: Chile became the focus of much attention as fascism ruled there; WILPF helped in causing the
U.S. government to admit to its role in the coup that occurred in 1973 that overthrew the Chilean democracy, and helped gain Orlando Letelier's release from torture and prison. It continued to lobby in support of the Chilean people's struggle for a return to democracy.
1972 (June): Angela Davis was acquitted after 16 months in jail and 20 months on trial; her mother, Sallye
Davis, was a founding member of the Birmingham (AL) Branch. WILPF was deeply involved in working for the acquittal, "a landmark in the movement for freedom and against racism and injustice."
1973: Six woman team went to Chile to investigate human rights violations, reporting findings to
Congressional conference and U.N. Human Rights Commission.
1973 (Sept. 21): Mme. Ngo ba Thanh, a leader of the Vietnam women's and peace movements and a
WILPF member, was released from prison.
1974: National Board decided the national office program priorities would be: 1) changing the economic
system, with a focus on the economics of energy; and 2) ending militarism, to focus on ending U.S. military and police aid abroad with particular emphasis on Vietnam and Chile.
1975 (April): Peace and Freedom reported that a half-hour television show about WILPF was to be made
by the Public Broadcasting TV station in Philadelphia (WHUY, Channel 12), called "Take 12."
1975 (May): The United Nations declared 1975 as International Women's Year; WILPF,JAPA and WIDF
co-sponsored a disarmament seminar at the U.N., at which women from 27 countries met with 200 women from the U.S. The representative from the Cuban Women's Union was the first Cuban permitted by the U.S. government to enter the country for a political meeting since the Cuban revolution.
1975-1976: Kay Camp served as International President.
1976: Initiated program on women and economic change with "Feed the Cities, Not the Pentagon"
campaign.
1977 (March): Dorothy Steffens ended term as Executive Director.
1977: Melva Mueller began her term as Executive Director.
1977: Supported J.P. Stevens boycott, as well as farmworkers' boycotts of lettuce, grapes, and
Campbells.
1977: WILPF women joined Journey of Reconciliation march in northern Ireland.
1977-1978: As part of WILPF's Feed the Cities, Not the Pentagon program, the Executive Director and
U.S. President Marjorie Boehm spent time in Washington (DC) lobbying re: national priorities; national staff and Branches worked to have the Transfer Amendment passed. WILPF played a positive role in the debate re: the Panama Canal treaties. It established a positive presence at the National Women's Conference at Houston (Texas) in November 1977. Kay Camp represented WILPF at the international NGO Disarmament Conference, convened in Geneva on Feb. 27, 1978 in anticipation of the U.S. Special Session Devoted to Disarmament (SSD). The SSD was supported by WILPF in many ways and it proved a fruitful source for lobbying on the local and national levels, peace education in schools, and the opportunity to meet with others on an international level who wanted to promote disarmament; Kay Camp served as advisor to the U.S. Delegation which attended the SSD.
1978 (Feb.): Sixteen WILPF women went on mission to Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and Israel to
assess prospects for Middle East peace.
1978 (April 28): Benjamin Linder, son of Elisabeth (chair of the Portland (Oregon) Branch), was killed by
the contras in Nicaragua.
1978 (Oct.): The Swarthmore College Peace Collection asked "all WILPF members to search attics and
trunks for Jane Addams' letters or manuscripts and photographs related to her work with the Woman's Peace Party and WILPF. Since 1980 will mark the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the Peace Collection at Swarthmore, it is hoped that significant new material will be uncovered by that time for a special exhibit to honor Jane Addams' memory."
1978 (Oct.): Helen Kusman (Vice President) and Marjorie Boehm (U.S. President) visited Cuba as a result
of an invitation from the Federation of Cuban Women.
1978: Initiated a successful two day conference in Washington (DC) on the SALT II treaty, the first day of
which was sponsored by the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, and the second day by WILPF. Over 200 women leaders came together to learn about the relationship of women's issues and the arms race.
1979: Held Conference on Racism, focusing on its racism's effect on jobs, education and the legal system.

1980s
1980: Peace and Freedom included articles on boycotts, civil rights, conversion, disarmament / military
spending, draft and registration, economics, energy, FBI and CIA, Korea, Latin America, Middle East, national priorities, Native Americans, nuclear power / nuclear weapons, peace education, political prisoners and criminal justice, racism, repressive legislation, Southeast Asia, Southern Africa, toxic chemicals, United Nations, and women.
1981: Libby Frank began term as Executive Director.
1981: Peace and Freedom included articles on action and organizing, disarmament / military spending,
economics, energy, federal budget / national priorities, Ireland, Latin America / Central America, labor / boycotts, Middle East, Native Americans, nuclear power / nuclear weapons, peace education, political prisoners / justice system, racism, repression, reproductive rights, social security, Southeast Asia, Southern Africa, United Nations, and women.
1981: National Board approved three new projects to implement WILPF's priorities: outreach through a
series of local conferences to a wide range of women's groups with information about the federal budget, building on the "Feed the Cities, Not the Pentagon" campaign; support for a nuclear arms race freeze; and, establishment of a legislative network to counter U.S. attempts to intervene in the Middle East.
1982: Peace and Freedom included articles on Central America, disarmament / military spending, draft
registration and resistance, economics, energy, federal budget / national priorities, labor, Middle East, Native Americans, nuclear power / nuclear weapons, peace education, racism, Southeast Asia, Southern Africa, United Nations, and women.
1982: Launched STAR (Stop the Arms Race) campaign to collect 1,000,000 signatures, culminating in a
rally in Brussels (Belgium), a conference, and visits to NATO and Warsaw Pact embassies.
1982: National Board discussed program activities of the year: STAR Campaign; Disarmament and the
SSD II; Eurostrategic missiles; women and the federal budget; racism; and, the Middle East.
1983: Peace and Freedom included articles on disarmament / military spending, economics, federation
budget / national priorities, labor, peace education, racism, United Nations, and U.S. intervention.
1984: Carried out Women's Poll Project to ascertain size and area of the gender gap; worked with
Women's Vote Project to register women to vote.
1984: Along with other National Sections, launched a Comprehensive Test Ban petition drive. Petitions
with 350,000 signatures were gathered by WILPF activists and presented ot hte U.S. Mission to the United Nations on August 06, Hiroshima Day.
1984: Peace and Freedom included articles on disarmament / military spending, federal budget / national
priorities, labor, Middle East, Native Americans, nuclear power, organizing tools and techniques, peace camps, peace education, racism, South Africa, United Nations, WILPF history, and women.
1985: Launched Women and National Security program. Published Women's Budget which would cut
military expenses in half.
1985: Peace and Freedom included articles on Central America, civil disobedience, disarmament, federal
budget / national priorities, feminism, labor, Middle East, Nairobi, nuclear power / nuclear waste, peace camps, peace education, racism, South Africa, United Nations, women, and the history of WILPF.
1986: Libby Frank ended term as Executive Director; replaced by Jane Midgley (was formerly director of
Legislative Office).
1986: Peace and Freedom included articles on Central America, disarmament, federal budget, Libya /
Middle East, nonviolence, racism, South Africa, United Nations, and women.
1987: Peace and Freedom included articles on Central and Latin America, Congress / U.S. government,
disarmament, federal budget, labor, lesbian and gay rights, Middle East, nonviolence, the Pacific, peace movement, racial justice, Southern Africa, United Nations, and U.S. intervention.
1988: Peace and Freedom included articles on Central America, disarmament, feminism, Middle East,
peace education, peace movement, United Nations, and U.S. intervention.
1988-1989: Programming focused on racial justice, stopping U.S. global intervention, and achieving
disarmament by the year 2000 ("Disarmament . . . Easy as A B C" campaign).
1989: Peace and Freedom included articles on ageism, disarmament, environment, feminism, Latin
America, Middle East, Pacific Rim, racism, and the United Nations.

1990s
1990: Peace and Freedom included articles on Asia and the Pacific, the Cold War, disarmament and
economic conversion, environment, labor, Latin America, lesbian and gay rights, peace education, Persian Gulf / Middle East, racism, rights of children, South Africa, and the United Nations.
1991: 75th Anniversary Campaign surpassed its million dollar fundraising goal by raising $1,115,841.00.
Anniversary celebrations were held on the national level and by 63 Branches.
1991: Peace and Freedom includes articles about disarmament, economic justice, Latin America, lesbians,
the media, Persian Gulf / Middle East, racism, socialism, the United Nations, and women vs. violence.
1992: Jane Midgley ended term as Executive Director.
1992: Initiated the Women's Peace and Justice Treaty of the Americas; the aim was to "build new alliances
in the feminist movement and in other women's activist circles, and to broaden all our politics to include the whole spectrum of interrelated issues that profoundly affect [women], from battering and rape to job inequity and poverty, to state terrorism, intervention, and war."
1992: Chose "Become a Dangerous Woman" as the theme for the 1992-1993 membership campaign. "J.
Edgar Hoover called Jane Addams ' the most dangerous woman in America" because she dared to organize and speak out for a just, humane and disarmed world. The dangerous women who founded WILPF learned early that support and caring was a political necessity if they were to survive the hate, repression, and red-baiting. Our most dangerous political action is building strong branch communities where personal support is seen as a political necessity."
1992: Action priorities established for the 1990s included women vs. violence, racial justice, Women's
Peace and Justice Treaty of the Americas, economic justice and the women's budget, women's rights, and disarmament.
1992: Peace and Freedom included articles about abortion rights, Asia / Middle East, civil liberties, cuba,
disarmament, drug war, economics, environment, labor, lesbians, quincentennial, racism, the United Nations, and women.
1993: Peace and Freedom included articles about censorship, Cuba, health, lesbians, and racism.
1993-1996: Programming for these years focused on the Women's Peace and Justice Treaty of the
Americas through education, lobbying, and travel to support lifting the U.S. embargo of Cuba; racial justice through the South African Elections Project and the Documentation of Discrimination Project; disarmament/conversion through national and local efforts to close military/nuclear test sites; and women versus violence through various events and lobbying for legislation to end discrimination against women.
1994 (Jan.-Feb.): Legislative Office in Washington (DC) closed and moves to national office in
Philadelphia.
1994: Signed on to joint letters re: pro-choice, GATT, women's health care services, Yugoslav War
Crimes Tribunal, armed repression of indigenous and campesino organizations in Mexico, and nuclear weapons.
1994: Peace and Freedom included articles about Africa, the federal budget, Cuba, disarmament and the
economy, Haiti, lesbian/bisexual issues, the media, racism, the United Nations, and violence.
1995: Peace and Freedom includes articles about Bosnia, racism, the United Nations, and violence.
1995: Celebrated its 80th birthday with national and local events, including a Peace Train journey to the
Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing (China).
1995: Signed on to joint letters with other organizations re: abolishing nuclear weapons, human rights
violations in Columbia, debt relief for Nicaragua, minimum wage, gun legislation, among others.
1996: Marilyn Clement began term as Executive Director.
1996: Peace and Freedom included articles about anti-racism, children, Cuba, disarmament, the economy,
Guatemala, Iraq, labor, the Middle East, Native Americans, and the United Nations.
1996: Released the Women's Budget, providing information about how budgetary policies affect women.
1996 (April): Posters featuring Newt Gingrich and the presidents of some of the U.S.'s largest
corporations and emphasizing the question "Who really gets welfare?" were distributed on tax day.
1996: Great Day Peace Trains tour the Midwest and the West Coast to help focus attention on re-
prioritizing government spending.
1996 (July-Sept.): Program proposals for the 1996-1999 period included: disarmament within the
framework of economic justice, racial justice, ending intervention (by implementing the Women's Peace and Justice Treaty of the Americas, linking arms trade abroad and drug policy at home, and continuing the Cuba campaign), and women's rights (by working for a women's budget, and by helping women transcend/overcome violence).
1997 (March-May): Peace and Freedom included articles about Cuba, Columbia, the Women's Peace and
Justice Treaty of the Americas, and disarmament.
1997 (June-July): Peace and Freedom included articles about the Middle East, racism, and welfare.
1997 (Aug.-Sept.): Peace and Freedom included articles about Cuba, human rights, racism, Cyprus, and
WILPF's Truth and Reconciliation Symposium.
1997 (Oct.-Nov.): Peace and Freedom included articles on West Africa, labor unions, NATO, the death
penalty, fair trade, and women's work for peace and reconciliation. Calls for support of the Cuban Humanitarian Trade Act (HR 1951) and A Living Wage, Jobs For All Act (HR 1050).
1997: JAPA (Jane Addams Peace Association) celebrated its 50th anniversary.
1997 (Dec): Peace and Freedom included articles about Generation X and the international youth
movement, activism, media and democracy, leadership, war crimes, drug policy reform, and women challenging the politics of power.
1998 (Jan.): Peace and Freedom included articles about Cuba, the Women's Budget Project, China, the
Common Property Constitutional Amendment, and a memorial service for victims of the School of the Americas.
1998 (March 11): WILPF delegation delivered over 200 U.S. children's letters to the White House, as
part of WILPF's "Stop, Look and Listen!" campaign calling for a lifting of sanctions and a end to U.S. threats to bomb Iraq.
1998 (April): Peace and Freedom included articles about Iraq, women in the global economy, social
security, and El Salvador.
1998 (June): Peace and Freedom includes articles on women sowing seeds of peace in Africa, creating a
peace system, violence/nonviolence in the home, peace education, and a Truth and Reconciliation symposium.
1998: U.S. Section Change Mavens discussed fieldwork, leadership development, and program focus in
an effort to build WILPF for the 21st century.
1999: Marilyn Clement ended term as Executive Director; replaced by Mary Day Kent.
 
 
 
 



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