Swarthmore College Peace Collection

Sidney Dix Strong Papers, 1890-1938

Collection: DG 036


Contact Information
Swarthmore College Peace Collection
500 College Avenue
Swarthmore, PA 19081-1399
U.S.A.
Telephone: (610) 328-8557 (Curator)
Fax: (610) 328-8544
Email: wchmiel1@swarthmore.edu (Curator)
URL: http://www.swarthmore.edu/Library/peace/


Descriptive Summary
Repository
Swarthmore College Peace Collection
Creator
Strong , Sydney Dix (1860-1938)
Title
Sydney Dix Strong Papers
Inclusive Dates
1890-1938
Call Number
DG 036

Language of Materials
Materials in English
Extent
1.25 linear feet [papers only]
Abstract
Sydney Dix Strong (1860-1938) was an outspoken pacifist and strong supporter of disarmament, war resistance, and organized labor. He was the pastor for churches in Ohio and Illinois and did settlement work in Chicago. For his peace stance made him unpopular during WWI and in Oct. 1917 he was expelled from membership in the Municipal League of Seattle because of a speech he had given before the National Council of Congregational Churches, in which he praised the I.W.W. (International Workers of the World).

Strong published many articles and sermon series, as well as his book Rise of American Democracy in 1935, and from 1921-1938 was associate editor of Unity magazine. Other activities included a campaign to collect signatures for a "Peace Letter to the President" in 1926, while he was Secretary of the Seattle Peace League and of the Seattle group of Peacemakers; the development of a "2%" button, based on comments made by Albert Einstein that if 2% of those who were supposed to do military service would resist, the government would be powerless to go to war; heavy involvement with the Disarmament Conference (Conference for the Reduction and Limitation of Armaments) of 1932, which included trips to Geneva (Switzerland) as an observer and freelance correspondent during 1931-1934; leadership of the "Bury the Hatchet" campaign calling for Seattle to becoming a peaceful city; and, promotion in 1934 of a constitutional amendment providing for total disarmament. In addition, Strong was interested in the court case (1925-1927) surrounding ten year old Russell Tremain, who was removed from his parents' influence because they objected to his public school which required him to salute the flag.

Strong's correspondents included Devere Allen, A.B. Annes, Roger N. Baldwin, Mary Denton, Washington Gladdin, George Greenfield, John Haynes Holmes, Jessie Wallace Hughan, Rev. Paul Jones, Frank Kimball, Ernest Leo (C.O. at Camp Cody), John Nevin Sayre, Charles Sheldon and Lydia G. Wentworth.

Strong's daughter was Anna Louise Strong (1885-1970), a writer and editor on issues relating to Russia and China.

Administrative Information
Restrictions to Access
None
Usage Restrictions
None
Alternate Form of Material
Yes, Microfilm 85.1-85.2 [filming done under N.E.H. Grant No. RC 277-6-77-739]
Acquisitions Information
Received prior to 1947
Processing Information
Processed by SCPC staff; re-processed finding aid revised by Anne Yoder, July 2003; this version of finding aid created by Wendy E. Chmielewski, May 2010.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Sydney Dix Strong Papers (DG 036.), Swarthmore College Peace Collection
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendents, as stipulated by United States copyright law

Online Catalog Headings
These and related materials may be found under the following headings in online library/archival catalogs.
See tripod record


Related Collections
Anna Louise Strong Collected Papers (CDG-A)
Lydia G. Wentworth Papers (DG 041)

Historical Background
Sydney Dix Strong (1860-1938) was an outspoken pacifist and strong supporter of disarmament, war resistance, and organized labor. A graduate of Oberlin College, he pastored churches in Ohio and Illinois and did settlement work in Chicago, before pastoring the Queen Anne Congregational Church in Seattle (WA) from 1908 to 1921. His peace stance made him unpopular during WWI and in Oct. 1917 he was expelled from membership in the Municipal League of Seattle because of a speech he had given before the National Council of Congregational Churches, in which he praised the I.W.W. (International Workers of the World).

Strong published many articles and sermon series, as well as his book Rise of American Democracy in 1935, and from 1921-1938 was associate editor of Unity magazine. Other activities included a campaign to collect signatures for a "Peace Letter to the President" in 1926, while he was Secretary of the Seattle Peace League and of the Seattle group of Peacemakers; the development of a "2%" button, based on comments made by Albert Einstein that if 2% of those who were supposed to do military service would resist, the government would be powerless to go to war; heavy involvement with the Disarmament Conference (Conference for the Reduction and Limitation of Armaments) of 1932, which included trips to Geneva (Switzerland) as an observer and freelance correspondent during 1931-1934; leadership of the "Bury the Hatchet" campaign calling for Seattle to becoming a peaceful city; and, promotion in 1934 of a constitutional amendment providing for total disarmament. In addition, Strong was interested in the court case (1925-1927) surrounding ten year old Russell Tremain, who was removed from his parents' influence because they objected to his public school which required him to salute the flag.

Strong's correspondents included Devere Allen, A.B. Annes, Roger N. Baldwin, Mary Denton, Washington Gladdin, George Greenfield, John Haynes Holmes, Jessie Wallace Hughan, Rev. Paul Jones, Frank Kimball, Ernest Leo (C.O. at Camp Cody), John Nevin Sayre, Charles Sheldon and Lydia G. Wentworth.

Strong's daughter was Anna Louise Strong (1885-1970), a writer and editor on issues relating to Russia and China.


Collection Overview
The collection contains the correspondence and writings of Sydney Dix Strong.






Detailed Description of the Collection

Box 1 [on mf reel 85:1] off-site
Correspondence, 1895, 1897-1899
Correspondence, 1906
Correspondence, 1914-1916
Correspondence, 1917-1919
Correspondence, 1920-1921, 1924
Correspondence, 1926 [mostly re: “Peace Letter to the President of the United States”]
Correspondence, 1927, 1929
Correspondence, 1930-1938
Correspondence, undated
Work re: Russell Tremain case, 1927

Box 2 [on mf reel 85:1] off-site
Biographical information
Appeals & correspondence re: “Peace Letter” and “Peaceworkers”
Letters to the Editor, 1930-1935, n.d.
Geneva disarmament conference: writings – bound reports, 1932-1933
Geneva disarmament conference: writings, Feb. 1931 – Oct. 1932
Geneva disarmament conference: writings, Nov. 1932 – 1934
Geneva disarmament conference: writings, undated

Box 2 (cont.) [on mf reel 85:2] off-site
Writings re: disarmament amendment, 1934

Box 3 [on mf reel 85:2] off-site
Published sermons: sermon series
-- Christianity and Modern World
-- Commandments of Jesus
-- Faith
-- The Gospel at Work
-- Great Characters of Liberty
-- His Last Week
-- New Social order
-- Program for the New Order
-- The Religion of Jesus
Published sermons: sermon series
-- A Seattle Pulpit, 1917-1922
Published sermons: sermons series
-- Great Messages by Mail
Published sermons: in pamphlet/tract form
Published sermons: in leaflet form (in alpha order, by title)
Sermons: rough drafts and/or typescripts
Sermons: rough drafts and/or typescripts; published articles/pamphlets, 1890-
Miscellaneous

Box 3 (cont.) [not on mf] off-site
Re-File material

Note: 1 "2%" button was removed to the Button/Pin/Ribon Collection



This file was last updated on May 21, 2010.