Spring 2013 Creative Writing Workshop Guidelines

GUIDELINES FOR THE POETRY WORKSHOP, ENGLISH 070A:

Students interested in the Poetry Workshop, English 070A, led this year by Betsy Bolton, should submit a brief printed sample of their writing - perhaps 5 poems, no more than 5 pages - to Carolyn Anderson in the English Department Office (LPAC 202) no later than Friday, October 26, at 4:00 p.m. Please do not send your submissions via email.

The Poetry Workshop is limited to 12 members. Students who have taken this workshop in previous years are NOT eligible to apply (but WILL be eligible for the Advanced Poetry Workshop, English 070C, scheduled for the fall of 2014.)  Students who have taken Grendel's Workshop (070D), Lyric Encounters (070E), or Natural History and Imagination (071H) ARE eligible to apply for both the Poetry Workshop and the Advanced Poetry Workshop.

This is a class in which students write, read, and talk about poetry. We will emphasize the discovery and development of each individual's distinctive poetic voice, imagistic motifs, and thematic concerns, within the context of contemporary poetics. The workshop will meet this spring on Monday afternoons from 1:15 to 5:00 p.m. Attending a few evening readings on campus will also be required.

The twelve students will be admitted solely on the basis of the writing sample submitted during fall semester. Final decisions about admission to the Workshop will be made by Friday, November 9 at 4:00 p.m. and will be posted on the bulletin board outside of the English Department office, LPAC 202.

   

GUIDELINES FOR THE FICTION WRITERS' WORKSHOP, ENGLISH 070B:

Students interested in the Fiction Writers' Workshop, English 070B, led this year by Gregory Frost, should submit a writing sample of up to 15 double-spaced pages to Carolyn Anderson in the English Department office, LPAC 202, no later than Friday, October 26th, at 4:00 p.m.  Please do not send your submissions via email.

The Fiction Workshop is limited to 12 members. Lectures will focus on the basic elements of fiction writing: narrative structure, character creation, dialogue, voice, details, and revision. Readings will provide examples of how other authors handle these elements in their work.  We will do a lot of writing, with both in- and outside-class exercises, and writing cues.  While there is no single text for the workshop, participants are urged to read Francine Prose's Reading Like a Writer (available in McCabe Library) as a guide to interacting with what you read from a different perspective.  Participants are expected to complete two pieces for group critiquing during the semester. The workshop will meet on Wednesday afternoons from 1:15 to 4:00 p.m. Attending some evening readings on campus by visiting authors is expected of you as well.

The twelve students will be admitted solely on the basis of the writing sample submitted as explained above. Final decisions about admission to the workshop will be made by Friday, November 9th at 4:00 p.m. and will be posted on the bulletin board outside of the English Department office, LPAC 202.

 

About the Instructor:

GREGORY FROST is an author of novels and short stories of the fantastic. His latest large work is the fantasy duology, Shadowbridge and Lord Tophet, from Random House/Del Rey.  It was voted one of the four best fantasies of the year by the American Library Association in 2009. His previous novel, the historical thriller Fitcher's Brides, which recasts the fairy tale of Bluebeard, was a finalist for both the World Fantasy and International Horror Guild Awards for Best Novel.  A graduate of the University of Iowa undergraduate writing program, he has taught at the Clarion Writing Workshop at UC San Diego, the Alpha SF Workshop in Greensburg, PA, in the Odyssey Workshop, at Temple University, and at the University of Pennsylvania. He also spent two years as a researcher for non-fiction television (Discovery Channel/Science Frontiers).

His latest short works can be found in V-Wars, edited by Jonathan Maberry (IDW), and in Supernatural Noir, edited by Ellen Datlow (Dark Horse Books).  His essay "Reading the Slipstream" was included in The Cambridge Companion to Fantasy Literature, edited by Professor Edward James & Dr. Farah Mendelsohn, (Cambridge University Press, 2012).

 

Students may apply to both of the English Department's creative writing workshops but if accepted to both may enroll in ONLY ONE per semester.