Psychology

FRANK H. DURGIN, Professor 3
ALLEN M. SCHNEIDER, Professor
BARRY SCHWARTZ, Professor 2
ANDREW WARD, Professor and Chair
JANE E. GILLHAM, Associate Professor 3
STELLA CHRISTIE, Assistant Professor
DANIEL J. GRODNER, Assistant Professor
CATHERINE J. NORRIS, Assistant Professor
MICHELE REIMER, Assistant Professor (part time)
JODIE A. BAIRD, Visiting Assistant Professor (part time)
ELIZABETH D. KRAUSE, Visiting Assistant Professor (part time)
CLORINDA E. VÉLEZ, Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow
ZHI LI, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow
LES SIKOS, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow
KATHRYN TIMMONS, Administrative Coordinator

2 Absent on leave, spring 2014.
3 Absent on leave, 2013–2014.

Psychology is concerned with the systematic study of human behavior and experience. Psychologists use diverse approaches to understand human relationships, mental and emotional life, and decision-making, as well as the relationships between language, perception, the mind, and the brain. Topics also include the influence of other people on the individual and the origins and treatment of mental illness.

The Academic Program

The courses and seminars of the department are designed to provide a sound understanding of the principles and methods of psychology. Students learn the nature of psychological inquiry and psychological approaches to various problems encountered in the humanities, the social sciences, and the life sciences.

The Psychology Department offers a course major and minor, honors major and minor, and regularized special majors in neuroscience and in psychology and education. Students may, with approval, develop other individualized special majors, such as psychology and economics.

Prerequisites

The most common way to fulfill the prerequisite for further work in psychology is to take PSYC 001 Introduction to Psychology. A second entry point is a psychology first-year seminar: PSYC 006 First-Year Seminar: Happiness or PSYC 007 First-Year Seminar: Early Social Cognition.

Advanced Placement

Alternatively, a student may meet the prerequisite for psychology courses with a grade of AP 5 on the psychology Advanced Placement test or a grade of 6 or 7 for psychology in the International Baccalaureate Program, but this practice is not encouraged. In either case, an entering student should seek guidance from the department chair or academic coordinator about selection of a first psychology course. Students electing the AP or IB placement option are not permitted to take a core course (numbered in the 30s) in their first semester. (Swarthmore credit is not granted for AP or IB work in psychology.)

Course Major

A course major must include at least 8 credits in psychology. One additional credit is required in statistics as a prerequisite for PSYC 025.
Normally, one credit of the 8 credits in psychology may be accepted from a semester abroad. The minimum requirement excludes courses cross-listed in psychology that are taught solely by members of other departments, such as EDUC 021/PSYC 021, EDUC 023/PSYC 023 and EDUC 026/PSYC 026. COGS 001 Introduction to Cognitive Science may be counted in the minimum courses required for the major when taught by a member of the psychology department.
A typical sequence of courses toward a major begins with PSYC 001 Introduction to Psychology (or equivalent), followed by a core course (those with numbers in the 30s) or PSYC 025 Research Design and Analysis.

Requirements

  1. PSYC 001 Introduction to Psychology (or equivalent) is normally a prerequisite for all courses in psychology (see the note about prerequisites above).
  2. PSYC 025 Research Design and Analysis is a requirement for the major. Note that STAT 011 Statistical Methods (or equivalent, e.g., ECON 031) is a prerequisite for PSYC 025, or may be taken concurrently.
  3. At least four core courses in psychology are required (those with numbers in the 30s): 030 Physiological Psychology; 031 Cognitive Neuroscience; 031A Social, Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience; 032 Perception; 033 Cognitive Psychology; 034 Psychology of Language; 035 Social Psychology; 036 Thinking, Judgment and Decision Making; 038 Clinical Psychology; 039 Developmental Psychology.
  4. Finally, to graduate with a major in psychology, students must also complete a culminating research experience, described below.

Comprehensive Requirement: Culminating Research Experience

Students in the Course Program must satisfy the College’s comprehensive requirement in their majors. In psychology, this can be done in one of the following four ways:

  1. Complete a research practicum in psychology in the senior year: PSYC 102 Research Practicum in Cognition and Perception; PSYC 103 Research Practicum in Behavioral Neuropharmacology; PSYC 104 Research Practicum in Language and Mind; PSYC 105 Research Practicum in Psychology and Neuroscience: Social Imitation; PSYC 106 Research Practicum in Cognitive Development; 108 Research Practicum in School-Based Interventions; 109 Research Practicum in Clinical Psychology. Students may enroll in these practica to conduct original empirical research for one-half (an option for some practica) or one credit, and may take these courses before the senior year without meeting the comprehensive requirement. When taking these courses to meet the comprehensive requirement, the student will normally enroll for one credit and participate in the Senior Research Poster Session.
  2. Complete PSYC 098 Senior Research Project. With the approval of the faculty, students may select a topic of their choice in psychology and write a substantial paper on the topic based on library research–and possibly some original empirical research. The paper may constitute a significant expansion and extension of a paper or papers written by the student previously for psychology courses, or it may address a topic on which the student has not written before. Students are encouraged, but not required, to select topics that span more than one content area in psychology. In addition to submitting their written reports, students participate in the Senior Research Poster Session. Students receive either one-half or one course credit for satisfactory work on the Senior Research Project, and a letter grade is assigned. Students normally enroll in the course in the fall semester.
  3. Complete PSYC 096­–097 Senior Thesis. Admission to the senior thesis program is by application only. Enrollment in 2 credits of senior thesis, one each semester of the senior year, is required. We require that students wishing to prepare a senior thesis have averages at the high B level in psychology and overall. Application to the senior thesis program is usually made by the end of the junior year. The list of faculty research interests on the department’s website will help students identify the appropriate faculty member to consult when developing thesis plans.
  4. Complete a clinical practicum (PSYC 090) in the spring semester of the senior year. Extensive planning in advance is necessary. See the PSYC 090 description.

Acceptance Criteria

To be accepted as a course major, students must have successfully completed two courses in psychology and be in good standing at the College.

Course Minor

A course minor in psychology requires a minimum of 5 credits taken with psychology faculty at Swarthmore. There is no comprehensive requirement.

Requirements

PSYC 001 Introduction to Psychology (or equivalent) is normally a prerequisite for all courses in Psychology (see the note about pre-requisites above).
A minimum of two core courses in psychology (those with numbers in the 30s) is required: 030 Physiological Psychology; 031 Cognitive Neuroscience; 031A Social, Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience; 032 Perception; 033 Cognitive Psychology; 034 Psychology of Language; 035 Social Psychology; 036 Thinking, Judgment and Decision Making; 038 Clinical Psychology; 039 Developmental Psychology.

Acceptance Criteria

To be accepted as a course minor, students must have successfully completed one course in psychology and be in good standing at the College.

Honors Major

An honors major in psychology requires completing all the requirements for the course major while incorporating three honors preparations in psychology, of which one is a 2-credit senior honors thesis. The other two honors preparations in psychology are composed of two core courses (a course numbered in the 30s) along with their corresponding one-credit seminars (numbered in the 130s).
The Psychology Department currently offers examination in honors in the following fields:
Clinical Psychology
Cognitive Neuroscience
Cognitive Psychology/Perception
Developmental Psychology
Physiological Psychology
Psycholinguistics
Social Psychology
Thinking, Judgment and Decision Making

Requirements

PSYC 001 Introduction to Psychology (or equivalent) is normally a prerequisite for all courses in psychology (see the note about prerequisites above).
PSYC 025 Research Design and Analysis is required of honors majors, as it is for course majors. Note that STAT 011 Statistical Methods (or equivalent, e.g., ECON 031) is a prerequisite for PSYC 025 (or may be taken concurrently).
Two seminar-based honors preparations, as described above, must be completed, each consisting of a core course and its corresponding seminar.
In all, a minimum of four core courses in psychology (those with numbers in the 30s) must be completed: 030 Physiological Psychology; 031 Cognitive Neuroscience; 031A Social, Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience; 032 Perception; 033 Cognitive Psychology; 034 Psychology of Language; 035 Social Psychology; 036 Thinking, Judgment and Decision Making; 038 Clinical Psychology; 039 Developmental Psychology.
A two-credit honors thesis (PSYC 180), spread over both semesters of the senior year, is the third honors preparation and fulfills the comprehensive requirement in psychology.

The Honors Examination for Majors

In psychology, the usual form of evaluation is a three-hour written examination prepared by the external examiner and administered during the honors examination period in the senior year. This is followed, during the subsequent examiners’ weekend, by an oral examination with the examiner for each of a student’s preparations. An honors thesis stands in place of one written examination.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of an application to participate in the Honors Program as a major depends upon successfully completing two psychology courses at Swarthmore, normally PSYC 001, Introduction to Psychology, or a psychology first-year seminar, and one core course. Admission to the Honors Program usually takes place in the spring semester of the sophomore year, but students may apply for honors even in the junior year. To be accepted, students must have high B averages in psychology and overall. Moreover, to continue in honors, students must have attained a B+ average in psychology at the end of the junior year.

Honors Minor

Completing an honors minor in psychology requires fulfilling the requirements for the course minor while incorporating a single honors preparation in psychology, composed of a core course (a course numbered in the 30s) and its corresponding one-credit seminar (numbered in the 130s). A complete list of available preparations is given above in the section on honor majors.

Requirements

A minimum of five credits taken with psychology faculty at Swarthmore, including the honors preparation, are required for the honors minor. PSYC 001 Introduction to Psychology (or equivalent) is normally a prerequisite for all courses in psychology (see the note about prerequisites above).
Two of the five credits must be core courses in psychology (those with numbers in the 30s): 030 Physiological Psychology; 031 Cognitive Neuroscience; 031A Social, Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience; 032 Perception; 033 Cognitive Psychology; 034 Psychology of Language; 035 Social Psychology; 036 Thinking, Judgment and Decision Making; 038 Clinical Psychology; 039 Developmental Psychology.
The honors preparation is completed by taking the seminar corresponding to one of the aforementioned core courses. PSYC 025 Research Design and Analysis is strongly recommended for honors minors.

The Honors Examination for Minors

The usual form of evaluation is a three-hour written examination prepared by the external examiner and administered during the honors examination period in the senior year. This is followed, during the subsequent examiners’ weekend, by an oral examination with the examiner.

Acceptance Criteria

Approval of an application to participate in the Honors Program as a minor depends upon successfully completing two psychology courses at Swarthmore, normally PSYC 001, Introduction to Psychology, or a psychology first-year seminar, and one core course. Admission to the Honors Program usually takes place in the spring semester of the sophomore year, but students may apply for honors even in the junior year. To be accepted, students must have high B averages in psychology and overall. Moreover, to continue in honors, students must have attained a B+ average in psychology at the end of the junior year.

Special Major in Neuroscience

The psychology and biology departments have defined a regularized special major in neuroscience that combines work in the two departments in a way that allows students flexibility in choosing the focus of their Neuroscience majors. Approval and advising for this special major are done through both departments. Details about the course and honors special majors can be found online at www.swarthmore.edu/academics/biology/neuroscience.xml. Students interested in developing a special major in Neuroscience are encouraged to consult faculty in both departments.

Special Major in Psychology and Educational Studies

A student wishing to undertake a special major in psychology and educational studies will propose and justify an integrated program that includes 10–12 credits in the two disciplines, as described below.

Requirements

The special major will include 5 credits in courses or seminars taught by members of the department of psychology, including at least 3 core areas (courses numbered in the 30s) and PSYC 025 Research Design and Analysis. It will include at least 5 credits taught by members of the department of educational studies. One of these courses must be EDUC/PSYC 021 Educational Psychology. Practice Teaching (EDUC 016) and the Curriculum and Methods Seminar (EDUC 017) may not be included in the program.

Culminating Exercise/Comprehensive Examination

Either a two-semester, two-credit interdisciplinary senior thesis, a research practicum (0.5 or 1 credit), a practicum in clinical psychology (PSYC 090, 1 credit) or an integrated comprehensive project (PSYC 098 or EDUC 098, 0.5 credit) suitable to the special major serves to satisfy the comprehensive requirement. Theses and comprehensive projects are supervised by one member of each department. Students wishing to prepare a senior thesis must have averages at the high B level in psychology, educational studies, and overall. Application to the senior thesis program is usually made by the end of the junior year. Because special majors may not undertake work on a thesis in a semester in which they are student teaching, such students must be sure to apply early and to begin thesis work as second semester juniors.

Honors special major in psychology and education

The requirements for honors require that four honors preparations be included in the special major, including the senior honors thesis. For special majors involving educational studies, theses are supervised by both departments. Normally, the remaining three honors preparations consist of two two-credit seminars in educational studies and one preparation in psychology composed of a core course (a course numbered in the 30s) and its corresponding one-credit seminar (numbered in the 130s), but a program could be proposed involving two preparations in psychology and one in educational studies.

Acceptance Criteria

To be accepted as a special major in psychology and educational studies, a student must have successfully completed two courses in psychology, EDUC 014 Introduction to Education, and be in good standing at the College.

Other Special Majors Involving Psychology

Other individualized special majors including psychology may be designed. A special major in cognitive science, which may involve psychology, is administered through the program coordinator of cognitive science. A special major in psychology and economics is also an option.

Transfer Credit

Transfer credit is handled on an individual basis. Whenever possible, prior approval is recommended.

Off-Campus Study

The Psychology Department recognizes that international study may have an important place in the educational programs of students, and we support those who wish to include such an experience. We usually advise students to complete their time abroad by the middle of the junior year so that it does not interfere with applications for summer research or with the development of thesis proposals and senior research projects proposals. Students may wish to consult with an adviser in the department about their specific plan because of the absence of international standards in psychology. In most cases, we encourage students to emphasize work in areas other than psychology while away. However, the department may permit a student to transfer a single psychology course from a study abroad program to count toward the minimum major requirements, but normally not in fulfillment of a core course requirement nor as a prerequisite for an advanced seminar. Additional work may be considered for transfer beyond the minimum major requirements. Prior completion of introductory psychology or its equivalent is an important component of approval for transfer credit.

Research and Service-Learning Opportunities

Students are encouraged to get involved with research at any point in their time at Swarthmore, and many seniors also do field placements through the clinical practicum.

Academic Year Opportunities

There are many opportunities for research with the faculty of the department during the academic year either for academic credit (PSYC 094: Independent Research, PSYC 102: Research Practicum in Perception and Cognition, PSYC 103: Research Practicum in Behavioral Neuropharmacology, PSYC 104: Research Practicum in Language and Mind, PSYC 105 Research Practicum in Psychology and Neuroscience: Social Imitation, PSYC 106: Research Practicum in Cognitive Development, PSYC 108: Research Practicum in School Based Interventions, PSYC 109: Research Practicum in Clinical Psychology) or as a paid assistant. Students may participate in the design, conduct and analysis of projects at any stage in their program. In the senior year, such experiences, in the form of a thesis (PSYC 096–097 or PSYC 180) or research practicum, may constitute the culminating comprehensive experience. The list of faculty research interests on the department’s website will help students identify the appropriate faculty member to consult about developing research plans.
The clinical practicum (PSYC 090) provides field experience for students who are considering careers in clinical psychology, psychiatry, social work, and counseling. Some advanced students undertake practica to gain experience in clinical settings such as a shelter for battered women, a program for children with autism, or a residential treatment facility. Enrollment is often limited to seniors and requires at least a B average in Psychology as well as appropriate course preparation. The clinical practicum is a Community-based Learning course.

Service-Learning Opportunities

Several psychology courses are designated as Community-Based Learning courses. They are PSYC 090 Practicum in Clinical Psychology; PSYC 108 Research Practicum in School-Based Interventions; and PSYC 109 Research Practicum in Clinical Psychology.

Summer Research Opportunities

Students may apply for summer funding to conduct research in psychology either through the Social Sciences Division or through the Division of Natural Sciences and Engineering, depending on the nature of the research project. Students should seek the sponsorship of a faculty member who is willing to provide guidance in developing and submitting an application. Funding may be obtained to work with faculty members on campus or, in some cases, at another campus or setting. Students planning to prepare a thesis are especially encouraged to consider ways of integrating a summer of research into their thesis work, but all interested students should feel free to explore their options. The list of faculty research interests on the department’s website will help students identify the appropriate faculty member to consult.

Teacher Certification

Students who wish to qualify for certification at the secondary school level should consult faculty in the educational studies department. Psychology majors can complete the requirements for teacher certification in social science, through a program approved by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. For further information about the relevant set of requirements, please refer to the Educational Studies section of the Bulletin.

Life After Swarthmore

Psychology majors have followed a variety of paths after graduation, including into medicine, law, business, information technology, marketing, counseling, finance, theater, and education, as well as into traditional psychology programs leading to clinical practice and/or academic research in psychology, neuroscience and related fields.

Courses

PSYC 001. Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to the basic processes underlying human and animal behavior—studied in experimental, social, and clinical contexts. Analysis centers on the extent to which normal and abnormal behaviors are determined by learning, motivation, neural, cognitive, and social processes.
In addition to the course lectures, students are required to participate in a mini-seminar for several weeks during the semester. Each meeting is 1 hour and 15 minutes, typically during the Monday or Wednesday (1:15–4 p.m.), or Friday (2:15–5 p.m.) class periods. Students will be assigned to a group after classes begin but should keep at least one period open.
Students also act as participants in Psychology Department student and faculty research projects.
PSYC 001 is a prerequisite for further work in the department.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Each semester. Staff.

COGS 001. Introduction to Cognitive Science

(See COGS 001)
COGS 001 is offered in the Cognitive Science Program. It can count toward the minimum required credits in a psychology major when taught by a member of the Psychology Department.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Staff.

PSYC 006. First-Year Seminar: Happiness

What is happiness? How important is it to people? How important should it be to people? Do people know what makes them happy? If they do know, are they able to make decisions that promote happiness? This course asks all of these questions and tries to answer at least some of them by examining current psychological research. This course serves as an alternate prerequisite for further work in the department.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Schwartz.

PSYC 007. First-Year Seminar: Early Social Cognition

Humans are helplessly social: we spend much of our lives interacting with others, continuously encoding and processing information about our social world. What are the origins and developmental trajectory of our social cognition? Are we prejudiced from the start? How do we learn us vs. them distinction? When and how do young children come to appreciate the content of others’ minds? This course explores the underlying cognitive processes that shape infants’ and children’s understanding of the social world.
PSYC 007 serves as an alternate prerequisite for further work in the department.
No prerequisite.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Christie.

PSYC 021. Educational Psychology

(See EDUC 021)
Note: The Educational Studies Department offers this course. It does not count toward the minimum required credits for a psychology major or minor.
Fall 2013. Renninger.

PSYC 023. Adolescence

(See EDUC 023)
Note: The Educational Studies Department offers this course. It does not count toward the minimum required credits for a psychology major or minor.
Spring 2014. Smulyan.

PSYC 025. Research Design and Analysis

How can one answer psychological questions? What counts as evidence for a theory? This course addresses questions about the formulation and evaluation of theories in psychology. The scientific model of psychological hypothesis testing is emphasized, including the critical evaluation of various research designs and methodology, understanding basic data analysis and statistical issues, and the application of those critical thinking skills to social science findings reported in the media.
Students also learn to design and conduct psychology studies, analyze data generated from those studies, and write up their findings in the format of a psychology journal article.
This course is required for the major prior to the student’s senior year. Statistics 011 must be taken prior to or concurrently with the course.
Prerequisite: PSYC 001 and STAT 011 or equivalent.
Social sciences.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Baird, Norris. Spring 2014. Baird, Christie.

PSYC 026. Special Education: Issues and Practice

(See EDUC 026)
Note: The Educational Studies Department offers this course. It does not count toward the minimum required credits for a psychology major or minor.
Fall 2013. Linn.

PSYC 029. Practical Wisdom

(Cross-listed as POLS 077)
What is practical wisdom (what Aristotle called “phronesis”)? Is it necessary to enable people to flourish in their friendships, loving relations, education, work, community activities, and political life? What is the relevance of this Aristotelian concept for the choices people make in everyday life, and how does it contrast with contemporary Kantian, utilitarian, and emotivist theories of moral judgment and decision making? What does psychology tell us about the experience and character development necessary for practical wisdom and moral reasoning? And how do contemporary economic and political factors influence the development of practical wisdom?
Prerequisites: Some background in psychology, philosophy or political theory.
Enrollment is limited and by permission of the instructors. Applications available from either department office.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Schwartz and Sharpe.

PSYC 030. Physiological Psychology

A survey of the neural and biochemical bases of behavior with special emphasis on sensory processing, motivation, emotion, learning, and memory. Both experimental analyses and clinical implications are considered.
Eligible for Cognitive Science credit.
Prerequisite: PSYC 001.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Schneider.

PSYC 031A. Social, Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

This course focuses on the neural underpinnings of cognitive (memory, attention), social (theory of mind, empathy), and affective (emotion, evaluation) processes, as well as how they interact with and contribute to each other. We consider how such processes are implemented at the neural level, but also how neural mechanisms help give rise to social and emotional phenomena. Many believe that the expansion of the human brain evolved due to the complex demands of dealing with others - competing or cooperating with them, deceiving or empathizing with them, understanding or misjudging them. In this course, we review current theories and methods guiding social, cognitive, and affective neuroscience, taking a multi-level approach to understanding the brain in its social context.
Prerequisite: PSYC 001.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Norris.

PSYC 032. Perception

Perception is fundamental to both cognition and action. How does perception work? This course covers a variety of scientific theories of perception including biological analyses of comparative functional anatomy of sensory systems and the informational “ecology” in which they have evolved, as well as functionalist information processing theories including computational, statistical and inferential approaches. An integrated series of laboratories and demonstrations provides students with experience testing theories of perception empirically. Required weekly laboratory.
Prerequisite: PSYC 001 and PSYC 025: Research Design and Analysis or permission of instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Durgin.

PSYC 033. Cognitive Psychology

Cognitive psychology is one of the intellectual foundations on which modern psychological science is built. This course has two principal goals. On the one hand, it provides an integrated overview of a variety of subfields of cognitive psychology including perception, attention, memory, language, concepts, imagery, thinking, decision-making, and problem solving. On the other hand, it develops a coherent conceptual framework for understanding how behavioral experiments can illuminate the workings of the human mind.
Eligible for Cognitive Science credit.
Prerequisite: PSYC 001.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Staff.

PSYC 034. Psychology of Language

(Cross-listed as LING 034)
The capacity for language sets the human mind apart from all other minds, both natural and artificial, and so contributes critically to making us who we are. In this course, we ask several fundamental questions about the psychology of language: How do children acquire it so quickly and accurately? How do we understand and produce it, seemingly without effort? What are its biological underpinnings? What is the relationship between language and thought? How did language evolve? And to what extent is the capacity for language “built in” (genetically) versus “built up” (by experience)?
Prerequisite: PSYC 001 or permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Grodner.

PSYC 035. Social Psychology

Social psychology argues that social context is central to human experience and behavior. This course provides a review of the field with special attention to relevant theory and research. The dynamics of cooperation and conflict, the self, group identity, conformity, social influence, prosocial behavior, aggression, prejudice, attribution, and attitudes are discussed.
Prerequisite: PSYC 001.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Ward.

PSYC 036. Thinking, Judgment, and Decision Making

People in the modern world are flooded with major and minor decisions on a daily basis. The available information is overwhelming, and there is little certainty about the outcomes of any of the decisions people face. This course explores how people should go about making decisions in a complex, uncertain world; how people do go about making decisions in a complex, uncertain world; and how the gap between the two can be closed.
Prerequisite: PSYC 001.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Schwartz.

PSYC 037. Cultural Psychology

Humans are a cultural species, constantly navigating a complex web of culturally bound practices, norms, and worldviews. This course will survey the theory and research of the young but rapidly expanding field of cultural psychology. In the course, we will explore how culture shapes and is shaped by an array of psychological domains, ranging from perception, information processing, and language, to concepts of the self, motivations, emotion, morality, and physical and mental health.
Prerequisite: PSYC 001.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Ruby

PSYC 038. Clinical Psychology

A consideration of major forms of psychological disorder in adults and children. Cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic, sociocultural, and biological theories of abnormality are examined, along with their corresponding modes of treatment.
Prerequisite: PSYC 001.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Krause. Spring 2014. Reimer.

PSYC 039. Developmental Psychology

Do infants have concepts? How do children learn language? These questions and others are addressed in this survey course of physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development during infancy and early childhood. The course asks how and why human minds and behaviors develop, examining the theoretical perspectives and empirical evidence on the nature of developmental change.
Eligible for Cognitive Science credit.
Prerequisite: PSYC 001.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Christie.

PSYC 041. Children at Risk

Violence, educational inequality, war, and chronic poverty are key contexts for many children’s lives. We consider children’s responses to adversity from clinical, developmental and ecosystemic perspectives. In addition, we explore the role of psychology in both prevention and social policy affecting children and families.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and either PSYC 038: Clinical Psychology or PSYC 039: Developmental Psychology or permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Reimer.

PSYC 046. Psychology and Economic Rationality

The discipline of economics makes a set of assumptions about human motivation and decision making. This course examines those assumptions in light of evidence from other social sciences, especially psychology. The course is taught in a seminar format, open especially to students in psychology and economics.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and ECON 001 or related preparation with permission of instructor.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Schwartz.

PSYC 048. Gender and Psychopathology

Why are certain clinical syndromes, such as depression, overrepresented among women, while others, such as aggression, are more common among men? This course explores gender differences in emotion socialization, coping styles, and mental illness, including depression, eating disorders, posttraumatic stress, aggressive disorders, and substance abuse. It also critiques definitions of sex and gender and methodological approaches to the study of group differences.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and PSYC 038 Clinical Psychology.Social sciences.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Krause.

PSYC 050. Developmental Psychopathology

This course covers several psychological disorders that often first appear in childhood and adolescence, including autism and other developmental disorders, attention-deficit disorder, conduct disorder, eating disorders, and emotional disorders. Theories about the causes and treatment are discussed. A heavy emphasis is on current research questions and empirical findings related to each disorder.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and either PSYC 038: Clinical Psychology or PSYC 039: Developmental Psychology or permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Gillham.

PSYC 055. Family Systems Theory and Psychological Change

Systems theory is important in clinical, educational, medical and organizational contexts. This course explores family systems perspectives on illness and change. Research and theory are supplemented with popular film, documentaries, and therapeutic case histories to understand how psychologists work with individuals and organizations to address developmental, communication, and emotional impasses.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and either PSYC 038: Clinical Psychology or PSYC 039: Developmental Psychology or permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
Eligible for GSST credit.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Reimer.

PSYC 090. Practicum in Clinical Psychology

An opportunity for advanced psychology students to gain supervised experience in off-campus clinical settings. Requirements include 8 hours per week in an off-campus placement, weekly meetings to discuss placement experiences and relevant readings, and a major term paper. Students are expected to have clinical contact with clients/patients and to have an on-site supervisor. Students are responsible for arranging a placement, in consultation with the instructor in advance of the semester. Students applying for this course must have at least a B average in psychology. Contact the instructor for details and an application form. When taken in the senior year, this course fulfills the comprehensive requirement in psychology. Students who plan to take PSYC 090 to fulfill the senior comprehensive requirement must apply by April 15 of the junior year. For all other students, applications are due November 4.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and one of the following: PSYC 038: Clinical Psychology, PSYC 041: Children at Risk or PSYC 050: Developmental Psychopathology. Enrollment is limited to seniors and juniors. If the course over-enrolls, priority is given to senior majors and special majors.
Social sciences. Community-based Learning course.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Vèlez.

PSYC 091. Advanced Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience

Current issues in behavioral neuroscience are considered from both a clinical and an experimental perspective. Topics include learning and memory, with a focus on emotional memory and its relation to anxiety disorders; memory storage, with a focus on the impact of brain damage; neuropsychiatric and degenerative disorders, including schizophrenia, clinical depression, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases; psychopharmacology, with a focus on drug addiction.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and PSYC 030: Physiological Psychology or permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Schneider.

PSYC 094. Independent Research

Students conduct independent research projects. They typically study problems with which they are already familiar from their courses. Students must submit a written report of their work. Registration for independent research requires the sponsorship of a faculty member in the Psychology Department who agrees to supervise the work.
Each semester. Staff.

PSYC 095. Tutorial

Any student may, under the supervision of a member of the Psychology Department, work in a tutorial arrangement for a single semester. The student is thus allowed to select a topic of particular interest and, in consultation with a faculty member, prepare a reading list and work plan. Tutorial work may include field research outside Swarthmore.
Each semester. Staff.

PSYC 096 and 097. Senior Thesis

A senior thesis, which is a yearlong empirical research project, fulfills the senior comprehensive requirement in psychology. It must be supervised by a member of the department and must be taken as a two-semester sequence for 1 credit each semester. Admission requirements include a B+ average in psychology and overall, an approved topic, an adviser, and sufficient advanced work in psychology to undertake the thesis. The supervisor and an additional reader (normally a member of the department) evaluate the final product. Students should develop a general plan in consultation with an adviser by the end of the junior year. Students are encouraged to begin thesis work during the summer preceding the senior year.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and PSYC 025: Research Design and Analysis and permission of a research supervisor.
Social sciences.
1 credit each semester.
Each semester. Staff.

PSYC 098. Senior Research Project

As one means of meeting the comprehensive requirement, a student may select a topic in psychology in consultation with psychology faculty. Usually prepared during the fall semester of the senior year, the student writes a substantial paper on the topic based on library research or original empirical research. In addition to submitting written reports, students participate in a poster conference at the end of the semester. One-half credit or one credit with a letter grade is awarded for all components of the project. See the department website for further details www.swarthmore.edu/academics/psychology/academic-program/majors-and-mino....
Prerequisites: PSYC 001; PSYC 025: Research Design and Analysis, and permission of a research adviser.
Social sciences.
Section 01. 0.5 credit.
Section 02. 1 credit.
Fall 2013. Staff.

PSYC 102. Research Practicum in Perception and Cognition

In this course, students conduct research projects singly or in small groups in collaboration with the instructor. Projects include designing, implementing, analyzing and reporting an experiment. Project topics are negotiated at the beginning of the semester. Past projects have studied eye-movements and decision-making, perception of the bodily self, self-motion and space perception, metaphor processing, and even experimental demand characteristics. All students meet together for a weekly lab meeting; additional weekly meeting times will be scheduled. When taken in the senior year, this course fulfills the comprehensive requirement in psychology.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001; PSYC 025: Research Design and Analysis and permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
Section 01: 0.5 credit.
Section 02: 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Durgin.

PSYC 103. Research Practicum in Behavioral Neuropharmacology

In this practicum students conduct research projects in small groups in collaboration with the instructor. Projects include designing, implementing, analyzing and reporting an experiment. Experiments are directed at characterizing and pharmacologically targeting underlying mechanisms mediating abnormal fear memory, based on an animal model of anxiety disorders. When taken in the senior year, this practicum fulfills the comprehensive requirement in psychology and in neuroscience.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001; PSYC 025: Research Design and Analysis; PSYC 30: Physiological Psychology; prior training in conducting animal research and permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
0.5 credit.
Spring 2014. Schneider.

PSYC 104. Research Practicum in Language and Mind

In this course students conduct research projects singly or in small groups in collaboration with the instructor. Projects include designing, implementing, analyzing and reporting an experiment. Project topics are negotiated at the beginning of the semester. Past projects have investigated how people understand the perspective of conversational partners, how comprehenders resolve linguistic ambiguity, how perceivers infer what a speaker means from what they have said, and hemispheric differences in the way the brain processes language. All students meet together for a weekly lab meeting; additional weekly meeting times will be scheduled. When taken in the senior year, this course fulfills the comprehensive requirement in psychology.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001; PSYC 025: Research Design and Analysis, and permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
Section 01: 0.5 credit.
Section 02: 1 credit.
Fall 2013. Grodner.

PSYC 105. Research Practicum in Psychology and Neuroscience: Social Imitation

In this course students conduct research projects singly or in small groups in collaboration with the instructor. Projects include designing, implementing, analyzing and reporting an experiment. Project topics are negotiated at the beginning of the semester but will generally focus on topics related to social imitation, including why we tend to imitate others, what purposes social imitation serves, the consequences of social imitation for the experience of empathy, how imitation may give rise to emotional contagion, and how interpersonal factors such as similarity, attractiveness, and race bias may affect imitation. All students meet together for a weekly lab meeting; additional weekly meeting times will be scheduled. When taken in the senior year, this course fulfills the comprehensive requirement in psychology.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001; PSYC 025 Research Design and Analysis; either PSYC 031A Social, Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience or PSYC 035 Social Psychology and permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
Section 01: 0.5 credit.
Section 02: 1 credit.
Spring 2014. Norris.

PSYC 106. Research Practicum in Cognitive Development

This course provides experience in conducting research with infants and young children. Students conduct research projects singly or in small groups in collaboration with the instructor. Students will design, implement, analyze, and report an experiment. Project topics are negotiated at the beginning of the semester and are focused on language and concept acquisition as well as the interaction between language and cognition early in development. All students meet together for a weekly lab meeting; additional weekly meeting times will be scheduled. When taken in the senior year, this course fulfills the comprehensive requirement in psychology.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001; PSYC 025: Research Design and Analysis and permission of the instructor. PSYC 039 Developmental Psychology is strongly recommended.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Christie.

PSYC 108. Research Practicum in School-Based Interventions

This course provides experience conducting research on school-based interventions. Students collaborate on research that is evaluating school-based interventions designed to promote well-being in early adolescents. Students gain experience in many aspects of the research process, such as reviewing research literature, developing hypotheses, collecting, entering and analyzing data, writing in journal article format and presenting findings. All students meet together for lab meetings; additional meeting times will be scheduled. When taken in the senior year, this course fulfills the comprehensive requirement in psychology.
Commitment: 2 semester (fall and spring) commitment required.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001; PSYC 025: Research Design and Analysis and at least one of the following: PSYC 038: Clinical Psychology; PSYC 041: Children at Risk; PSYC 050: Developmental Psychopathology; PSYC 055: Family Systems Theory and Psychological Change; and permission of the instructor.
Social sciences. Community-based Learning course.
1 credit each semester.
Fall 2013 and spring 2014. Vèlez.

PSYC 109. Research Practicum in Clinical Psychology

This course provides experience in conducting research related to clinical psychology or positive psychology. Students collaborate on projects evaluating psychosocial interventions designed to promote well-being. Students gain experience in many aspects of the research process, such as reviewing research literature, developing hypotheses, collecting, entering and analyzing data, writing in journal article format and presenting findings. All students meet together for lab meetings; additional meeting times will be scheduled. When taken in the senior year, this course fulfills the comprehensive requirement in psychology.
Commitment: 2 semester (fall and spring) commitment required.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001; PSYC 025: Research Design and Analysis and permission of the instructor. PSYC 038: Clinical Psychology is strongly preferred.
Social sciences. Community-based Learning course.
1 credit each semester.
Fall 2013 and spring 2014. Vèlez.

Seminars

Note: Admission to honors seminars normally requires at least a B+ in the associated core course. Enrollment in seminars is normally limited to 12 students.

PSYC 130. Seminar in Physiological Psychology

An analysis of the neural bases of motivation, emotion, learning, memory, and language. Generalizations derived from neurobehavioral relations are brought to bear on clinical issues.
Eligible for Cognitive Science credit.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and PSYC 030: Physiological Psychology or permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Schneider.

PSYC 131A. Seminar in Psychology and Neuroscience: The Social Brain

This seminar focuses on a critical analysis of current social neuroscience literature, covering topics such as person perception, empathy, perspective taking, emotion, attitudes, relationships, stereotypes and prejudice. Students consider evidence from studies using a broad spectrum of methods, including behavioral measures, functional neuroimaging, neurophysiological recordings, neuropsychology and computational modeling.
Eligible for Cognitive Science credit.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and PSYC 031A: Social, Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience or permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Norris.

PSYC 132. Perception, Cognition and the Embodied Mind Seminar

This seminar examines foundational issues and theories in the empirical study of human perception and cognition including the interplay between perception, action, language, and reasoning. Emphasis is placed on skeptical rigor in exploring philosophical and neuroscientific considerations regarding embodied cognition. What counts as an explanation of experience? How could conscious beings evolve? What is the relationship between perception and cognition? Topics vary from year to year.
Prerequisites: PSYC 032: Perception, PSYC 033: Cognitive Psychology or COGS 001: Introduction to Cognitive Science or permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Durgin.

PSYC 133. Metaphor and Mind Seminar

This seminar examines scientific theories of metaphor with an emphasis on using metaphor as a way of understanding the representation of meaning in the brain and the communication of meaning.
Prerequisites: PSYC 033: Cognitive Psychology, PSYC 034: Psychology of Language or COGS 001: Introduction to Cognitive Science or permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Durgin.

PSYC 134. Seminar in Psycholinguistics

(Cross-listed as LING 134)
An advanced study of special topics in the psychology of language. A research component is sometimes included.
Eligible for Cognitive Science credit.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and PSYC 034: Psychology of Language or permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Grodner.

PSYC 135. Seminar in Social Psychology

The seminar will provide an opportunity for critical exploration of contemporary topics in social psychology, including findings from cross-cultural and social neuroscience research. Various perspectives and methods for investigating how human mind and social behavior interact with situational and environmental factors are considered. Real world implications and applications are also discussed.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and PSYC 035: Social Psychology or permission of the instructor. PSYC 025: Research Design and Analysis is strongly preferred.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Ward.

PSYC 136. Seminar in Thinking, Judgment, and Decision Making

The seminar considers in depth several of the topics introduced in PSYC 036.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and PSYC 036: Thinking, Judgment, and Decision Making or permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.
Next offered spring 2015. Schwartz.

PSYC 138. Seminar in Clinical Psychology

An advanced study of special topics in clinical psychology, including etiology and treatments for several major disorders, and emerging psychotherapies and community-based treatments. In fall 2013 we also focus on developmental psychopathology and special considerations involved in the psychotherapy of childhood disorders.
Prerequisites: Psych 001 and Psych 038: Clinical Psychology or permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Reimer.

PSYC 139. Seminar in Developmental Psychology

An advanced study of special topics in development: language and concept acquisition. We discuss findings from newborn infants, cross-cultural, and atypical population research relevant to the issues of language acquisition and conceptual development.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and PSYC 039: Developmental Psychology or PSYC 034: Psychology of Language or permission of the instructor.
Social sciences.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Christie.

PSYC 180. Honors Thesis

An honors thesis, a yearlong empirical research project, fulfills the senior comprehensive requirement in psychology as part of an honors major in psychology. It must be supervised by a member of the department and must be taken as a two-semester sequence for 1 credit each semester. Students should develop a general plan in consultation with an adviser by the end of the junior year. When possible, students are encouraged to begin work on their thesis during the summer before their senior year.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001; PSYC 025: Research Design and Analysis and permission of a research supervisor.
Social sciences.
1 credit each semester.
Each semester. Staff.