Music and Dance

Music
GERALD LEVINSON, Professor of Music
THOMAS WHITMAN, Professor of Music 3
BARBARA MILEWSKI, Associate Professor of Music and Chair
JONATHAN KOCHAVI, Assistant Professor of Music
MICAELA BARANELLO, Visiting Assistant Professor of Music
MARK LOMANNO, Visiting Assistant Professor of Music and Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow
JANICE HAMER, Visiting Associate Professor of Music (part time)
ANDREW HAUZE, Associate in Performance
MARCANTONIO BARONE, Associate in Performance (part time)
I NYOMAN SUADIN, Associate in Music and Dance Performance
JOSEPH GREGORIO, Associate in Performance (part time)
BERNADETTE DUNNING, Administrative Coordinator
SUSAN GROSSI, Administrative Assistant

Dance
SHARON E. FRIEDLER, Professor of Dance, Director of the Dance Program
KIM D. ARROW, Associate Professor of Dance 2
PALLABI CHAKRAVORTY, Associate Professor of Dance
GREGORY KING, Visiting Assistant Professor and Consortium on Faculty Diversity Fellow
JUMATATU POE, Assistant Professor of Dance (part time)
JON SHERMAN, Associate in Dance Performance (part time)
LADEVA DAVIS, Associate in Dance Performance (part time)
NI LUH KADEK KUSUMA DEWI, Associate in Dance Performance (part time)
DOLORES LUIS GMITTER, Associate in Dance Performance (part time)
HANS BOMAN, Dance Accompanist
BERNADETTE DUNNING, Administrative Coordinator
SUSAN GROSSI, Administrative Assistant
TARA WEBB, Arts Publicity and Costume Shop Supervisor

 

2 Absent on leave, spring 2015.
3 Absent on leave, 2014–2015.

Music

The study of music as a liberal art requires an integrated approach to theory, history, and performance, experience in all three fields being essential to the understanding of music as an artistic and intellectual achievement. Theory courses train students to understand and hear how compositions are organized. History courses introduce students to methods of studying the development of musical styles and genres and the relationship of music to other arts and areas of thought. The department encourages students to develop performing skills through private study and through participation in the chorus, gamelan, jazz ensemble, orchestra, wind ensemble, and the Fetter Chamber Music Program, which it staffs and administers.

The department assists instrumentalists and singers to finance the cost of private instruction. (See “Individual Instruction” under the heading “Credit for Performance.”)

The Academic Program

Course Major

The music major curriculum normally includes the following components. However, we welcome individualized proposals, which will be evaluated and approved on the basis of consultations with the music faculty. We continue to emphasize the importance of depth and mastery of musical skills and understanding, and we also recognize the value of studying the diversity of musical cultures.

A. Required. 5 courses in harmony and counterpoint plus musicianship sections (MUSI 040). MUSI 040 may be taken for 0.0 or 0.5 credit at the student’s option.

  • MUSI 011 and 040A
  • MUSI 012 and 040B
  • MUSI 013 and 040C
  • MUSI 014 and 040D
  • MUSI 115

B. Required. 4.5 courses in Music History and Literature:

  • MUSI 020 (Medieval and Renaissance)
  • MUSI 094 (Senior Research Topics in Music)

plus at least three of the following:

  • MUSI 021 (Baroque and Classical)
  • MUSI 022 (19th-Century Europe)
  • MUSI 023 (20th Century)
  • Any other history course numbered above 023
  • Courses with lower course numbers in areas such as Jazz or World Music, including extra or higher-level work, with approval of the instructor.

Course Majors are strongly advised to take 5 history courses if possible.

C. World Traditions Component. This requirement may be fulfilled in either of two ways:

  • One of the 4.5 course listed in category B, above, in Music History and Literature is to be a course in non-Western traditions numbered above 023; OR
  • Two semesters of participation in the Gamelan, Taiko, or Dance/Drum ensembles. (This also helps fulfill the ensemble requirement in category D, below).

D. Additional Requirements for Course Majors:

  • Keyboard skills
  • Score reading or MUSI 018: Conducting and Orchestration
  • Department ensemble for at least four semesters
  • Senior comprehensive examination (MUSI 094, 0.5-credit course)

The following is a description of these additional requirements:

Keyboard skills. This program is designed to develop keyboard proficiency to a point where a student can use the piano effectively as a tool for studying music. Students learn to perform repertoire and, in addition, play standard harmonic progressions in all keys. The department offers a free weekly private lesson to any student enrolled in a Harmony and Counterpoint numbered 011 or higher who needs work in this area and requires it of all students in MUSI 012. Music majors and minors who have completed the theory sequence but who need further instruction are still eligible. No academic credit is given for these lessons. All music majors are expected to be able to perform a two-part Invention of J. S. Bach (or another work of similar difficulty) by their senior year.

Score reading. By the end of their senior year, all majors are expected to be able to read an orchestral score that includes c-clefs and some transposing instruments. Students may take MUSI 018 (Conducting and Orchestration) to satisfy this requirement.

Department ensemble. The department requires majors and minors to participate in any of the departmental ensembles (Orchestra, Chorus, Wind Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, and Gamelan). We also recommend that students participate in other activities, such as playing in Chamber Music ensembles or seeking out service-learning experiences that incorporate music.

Comprehensive examination. During their senior year, majors in the Course Program will take the departmental comprehensive examination, which normally consists of the study of a single musical work (selected in advance by the student, subject to the approval of the department) which demonstrates skills in the three areas of analysis, historical research, and performance. Majors in course will enroll in MUSI 094 (Senior Research Topics in Music) in the spring semester of their senior year to help them prepare for their senior comprehensive examination.

Course Minor

Required. At least two courses in harmony and counterpoint plus musicianship sections (MUSI 040):

  • MUSI 011 and 040A
  • MUSI 012 and 040B

Required. At least two courses in music history and literature:

  • MUSI 020 (Medieval and Renaissance)
  • MUSI 021 (Baroque and Classical)
  • MUSI 022 (19th-Century Europe)
  • MUSI 023 (20th Century)
  • Another history course numbered above 023 (or a lower-level history course, with approval of the faculty)

Required. At least one of the following:

  • Harmony and counterpoint (MUSI 013 or higher)
  • Upper-level history course
  • MUSI 019 (Composition)

Additional Requirements

  • Department ensemble for at least two semesters; and at least one of the following, subject to departmental approval of a written proposal:
  • Keyboard skills
  • Service-learning project in music
  • Senior recital
  • Special project in music

Honors Major

Summary: The music major in honors is identical to the music major in course in its prerequisites, required coursework, and requirements for keyboard skills, score reading, and Department Ensemble membership. The honors major differs in that there is no senior comprehensive exam. Instead, honors majors do three honors preparations in music.

Three Honors Preparations

  • Music theory. A 2-credit honors preparation in music theory is normally based on MUSI 015 in combination with one lower-level harmony and counterpoint course.
  • Music history. A 2-credit honors preparation in music history may be based on any music seminar numbered 100 or higher or on any other music history course when augmented by concurrent or subsequent additional research, directed reading, or tutorial, with faculty approval.
  • Elective (may be based on any of the following):
  • At least two semesters of MUSI 019 (Composition)
  • An additional preparation in another area of music history
  • A senior honors recital

A 2-credit senior honors recital preparation is available to only students who have distinguished themselves as performers. It is, therefore, limited to those who have won full scholarships through MUSI 048. Students who wish to pursue this option must follow all of the steps listed in the departmental guidelines for senior recitals (see department website) and obtain approval of their program from the music faculty during the semester preceding the proposed recital. They should register for MUSI 099: Senior Honors Recital. This full credit, together with at least another full credit of relevant coursework in music, will constitute the 2-credit honors preparation. One faculty member will act as head adviser on all aspects of the honors recital. As part of the honors recital, the student will write incisive program notes on all of the works to be performed. This work will be based on substantive research—including analytical as well as historical work—and will be overseen by one or more members of the music faculty.

Students are encouraged to propose honors preparations in any areas that are of particular interest, whether or not formal seminars are offered in those areas. The music faculty will assist in planning the most appropriate format for these interests.

Thesis / Culminating Exercise

Oral examinations are given for all honors preparations in music. Written examinations, in addition to oral examinations, are given only for those preparations based on courses or seminars.

Honors Minor

Required. Four courses in harmony and counterpoint plus musicianship sections (MUSI 040):

  • MUSI 011 and 040A
  • MUSI 012 and 040B
  • MUSI 013 and 040C
  • MUSI 014 and 040D

Required. Two courses in music history and literature:

  • MUSI 020 (Medieval and Renaissance)
  • MUSI 021 (Baroque and Classical)
  • MUSI 022 (19th-Century Europe)
  • MUSI 023 (20th Century)
  • Another history course numbered above 023

One honors preparation

  • Music theory, music history, or elective

The possibilities for preparations are the same as those listed above for major in the Honors Program.

Additional Requirements, same as for course minors.

  • Departmental ensemble for at least two semesters and at least one of the following, subject to departmental approval:
  • Keyboard skills
  • Service-learning project in music
  • Senior recital
  • Special project in music

Special Major

The department welcomes proposals for special majors involving music and other disciplines. Recent examples include the following:

  • Special major in music and education
  • Special major in enthnomusicology

Other special majors are possible. For more information, contact the department chair.

Application Process Notes for the Major or the Minor

We do not have a minimum grade point average (GPA) for admission as a major or minor. In its place is a consensus of music faculty that the student can do good work in the discipline. The situation is perhaps more complex in music than in other fields because we think that a major (or minor) should have basic musical as well as purely intellectual abilities, not all of which can be measured by a GPA. We do consider the likelihood of a student’s passing the Comprehensive Examination. Students applying for admission as majors in the Honors Program should have done exceptionally high-quality work in the department and should have shown strong self-motivation.

Prerequisites for acceptance into the program: MUSI 011/040A and one Music History course numbered 020 or above. These courses are strongly recommended for first-year students and should be completed before the junior year. If a student has not completed all of these prerequisites at the time of an application for a major/minor, but has done good work in one or more courses in the department, he or she may be accepted on a provisional basis.

Off Campus Study/Language Study

Students are encouraged to seek possibilities for off campus study, in accordance with their particular interests, in consultation with the music faculty and the off-campus study adviser.

Students are advised that many graduate programs in music require a reading knowledge of French and German.

Additional Resources

A unique resource of the department is its ensemble in residence, Orchestra 2001, directed by Professor Emeritus James Freeman. This nationally renowned ensemble offers an annual concert series at the College, focusing on contemporary music. The series features distinguished soloists and often includes advanced Swarthmore students in its concerts.

Special scholarships and awards in music include the following (see Distinctions, Awards, and Fellowships):

The Renee Gaddie Award

Music 048 Special Awards

The Boyd Barnard Prize

The Peter Gram Swing Prize

The Melvin B. Troy Prize in Music and Dance

Credit for Performance

Note: All performance courses are for half-course credit per semester. No retroactive credit is given for performance courses.

Individual Instruction (MUSI 048)

Academic credit and subsidies for private instruction in music are available to students at intermediate and advanced levels. For further details, consult the MUSI 048 guidelines on the Music Program website.

Orchestra, Chorus, Wind Ensemble, Gamelan, Chamber Music, Jazz Ensemble

Students may take Performance Chorus (MUSI 043), Performance Orchestra (MUSI 044), Performance Jazz Ensemble (MUSI 041), Performance Wind Ensemble (MUSI 046), Performance Chamber Music (MUSI 047), or Performance Gamelan (MUSI 049A) for credit with the permission of the department member who has the responsibility for that performance group. The amount of credit received will be a half-course in any one semester. Students applying for credit will fulfill requirements established for each activity (i.e., regular attendance at rehearsals and performances and participation in any supplementary rehearsals held in connection with the activity). Students are graded on a credit/no credit basis.

Students wishing to take Chamber Music (MUSI 047) for credit must submit to the chamber music coordinator at the beginning of the semester a proposal detailing the repertory of works to be rehearsed, coached, and performed during the semester. It should include the names of all student performers and the proposed performance dates, if different from the Elizabeth Pollard Fetter Chamber Music Program performance dates. One semester in a Department Ensemble is a prerequisite or co-requisite for each semester of MUSI 047. This applies to all students in each Fetter Chamber group. It is expected that Fetter students in Department Ensembles will play the same instrument/voice in both activities.

A student taking MUSI 047 for credit will rehearse with his or her group or groups at least 2 hours every week and will meet with a coach (provided by the department) at least every other week. All members of the group should be capable of working well both independently and under the guidance of a coach. It is not necessary for every person in the group to be taking MUSI 047 for credit, but the department expects that those taking the course for credit will adopt a leadership role in organizing rehearsals and performances. Note: MUSI 047 ensembles do not fulfill the ensemble requirement for lessons under MUSI 048.

Courses and Seminars

Introductory Courses without Prerequisite

MUSI 001. Introduction to Music

This course is designed to teach intelligent listening to music by a conceptual rather than historical approach. Although it draws on examples from popular music and various non-Western repertories, the course focuses primarily on the art music of Europe and the United States. Prior musical training is not required. It is assumed that MUSI 001 students will not know how to read music. This course is taught with little or no use of musical notation.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 002B. Reading and Making Music: The Basics of Notation

An introduction to the elements of music notation, theory (clefs, pitch, and rhythmic notation, scales, keys, and chords), sight singing, and general musicianship. Recommended for students who need additional preparation for MUSI 011 or to join the College chorus.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Hauze.

MUSI 003. Jazz History

This course traces the development of jazz from its roots in West Africa to the free styles of the 1960s. The delineation of the various styles and detailed analysis of seminal figures are included. Emphasis is on developing the student’s ability to identify both style and significant musicians.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 003B. Jazz and the Trans-Atlantic African Diaspora

From its earliest formations, jazz music has been inherently transcultural and particularly elemental to the cultural identity of individuals and communities identifying with the African Diaspora. This course posits improvisation—that is, encountering and working around borders while reacting to the impeding and facilitating possibilities they present—as a necessary and highly potent condition of cultural liminality. Accordingly, this course suggests that musical and cultural improvisatory performances can carve out discursive space within the socio-political systems that marginalize these communities. Drawing on the methodologies and scholarship of social sciences and the performing arts, we will explore this dynamic through interdisciplinary case studies in the Trans-Atlantic African Diaspora, with attention to local interpretations of global jazz culture and fusions of local music with jazz performance aesthetics. Also, the course will critically engage with the politics of collective identity, exploring how communities drawn together through a common genre marker or diasporic affiliation can themselves reproduce marginalizing hierarchies.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 004A. Opera

Combine great singing with the vivid colors of an orchestra, with acting and theater, with poetry, dance, painting, spectacle, magic, love, death, history, mythology, and social commentary, and you have opera: an art of endless fascination. This course will survey the history of opera (from Monteverdi through Mozart, Wagner, and Verdi to Gershwin and Stravinsky), with special emphasis on and study of scenes from selected works.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Milewski.

MUSI 004B. The Symphony

This course will examine the history of the symphony from its beginnings in music of the late Baroque period to the end of the 20th century. We will examine a number of important symphonic works by such composers as Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Berlioz, Brahms, Chaikovsky, Mahler, Shostakovich, and Gorecki in order to discuss issues of genre, form, and performance forces in the context of shifting historical and social trends.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 005. U.S. Pop Music History

This course will feature a survey of U.S. popular music from the late 19th century to present day. Discussion of individual case studies of music, musicians, and communities-in-music and significant movements and musicians—such as racial appropriation of R&B in 1950s rock and the performance of gender in glam rock—and will also take a look at the process of history-making by studying lesser known artists and critiquing the exclusionary practices of canon formation. We will discuss popular music as an industry and the effects of capitalist commerce on music-making, as well as political and socio-cultural interventions on music-making and distribution. Examples will include radio payola, legislated censorship, intellectual property law, public noise ordinances, reality music television, and illegal file-sharing practices.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Lomanno.

MUSI 005C. Traditional Musics of World Cultures

Introduction to world music and ethnomusicology via a set of case studies on traditional music and music-making practices. This course stresses music as an integral to--constitutive of, rather than separate from--the culture in which it is rooted. Within this framework we will discuss how the concept of “tradition” does not necessarily imply historical fact, but can be more influenced by understandings of and nostalgic feelings about “the past” as commentary and critique of the present. The course’s final project will consist of individual ethnographic projects, in which students engage with a local community group or musicians involved in some form of traditional music practice.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Lomanno

MUSI 006. The Arts as Social Change

(Cross-listed as DANC 004)
This course aims to bring together students with an interest in investigating and investing in social change work through the arts. Our seminar community will engage in discussion of readings and video viewings, will host and visit local leaders from the arts and social change movement, and will engage in fieldwork opportunities as required parts of the course. Papers, journals, and hands-on projects will all be included.
This course fulfills a prerequisite requirement for dance major and minors.
Eligible for PEAC credit.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 006B. Music of the Holocaust and World War II Era

This course will explore the various contexts and motivations for music making during the Holocaust and World War II era. In the universe of the Nazi ghettos and concentration camps, music was a vehicle for transmitting political rumors, controversies, stories, and everyday events as well as a form of spiritual resistance. In the broader context of war, it was used for political and nationalist agendas. This course will draw on a wide range of music, from folk songs and popular hit tunes to art music intended for the concert stage.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 007B. Beethoven and the Romantic Spirit

An introduction to Beethoven’s compositions in various genres. We will consider the artistic, political, and social context in which he lived and examine his legacy among composers later in the 19th century (Berlioz, Chopin, the Schumanns, Brahms, Wagner, and Mahler).
Writing course.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 008B. Anatomy for Performers: Bones, Muscles, Movement

(See DANC 008)
0.5 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 009A. Music and Mathematics

This course will explore the basic elements of musical language from a scientific and mathematical perspective. We will work collaboratively to uncover relationships and features that are fundamental to the way that music is constructed. Although intended for science, mathematics, engineering, and other mathematically minded students, the course will introduce all necessary mathematics; no specific background is required. Some knowledge of musical notation is helpful but not required. This course provides the necessary background to enable students to enroll in MUSI 011.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

Theory and Composition

Students who anticipate taking further courses in the department or majoring in music are urged to take MUSI 011 and 012 as early as possible. Advanced placement is assigned on a case-by-case basis, after consultation with the theory and musicianship faculty. Majors will normally take MUSI 011 to 015.

MUSI 011.01. Harmony, Counterpoint, and Form 1

This course will provide an introduction to tonal harmony and counterpoint, largely as practiced in 18th- and 19th-century Europe. Topics include simple counterpoint in 2 parts, harmonization of soprano and bass lines in four-part textures, systematic study of common diatonic harmonies, features of melody and phrase, and the Blues.
Prerequisites: Knowledge of traditional notation and major and minor scales; ability to play or sing at sight simple lines in treble and bass clef.
All MUSI 011 students must register for an appropriate level of MUSI 040A for 0 or 0.5 credit.
Keyboard skills lessons may also be required for some students.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Kochavi.

MUSI 011.02. Harmony, Counterpoint, and Form 1

This seminar will provide an introduction to tonal harmony and counterpoint, largely as practiced in 18th- and 19th-century Europe. Topics include simple counterpoint in 2 parts, harmonization of soprano and bass lines in four-part textures, systematic study of common diatonic harmonies, features of melody and phrase, the Blues, and classical theme and variation techniques. Certain examples for analysis will be drawn from current repertoire of the College Orchestra, Chorus, and Jazz Ensemble.
Prerequisites: Knowledge of traditional notation and major and minor scales; ability to play or sing at sight simple lines in both treble and bass clef.
All MUSI 011 students must register for an appropriate level of MUSI 040A for 0 or 0.5 credit.
Keyboard skills lessons may also be required for some students.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Kochavi.

MUSI 012. Harmony, Counterpoint, and Form 2

This course will provide continued work on tonal harmony and counterpoint, largely as practiced in 18th- and 19th-century Europe. Topics include two-voice counterpoint, harmonization of soprano and bass lines in four-part textures, phrase structure, small and large scale forms, modulation and tonicization, and analysis using prolongational reductions. We will also study minuet form in detail, culminating in a final composition project.
All MUSI 012 students must register for an appropriate level of MUSI 040B for 0 or 0.5 credit.
Keyboard skills lessons are required for all students in MUSI 012.
1 credit.
Spring 2015.Levinson.

MUSI 013. Harmony, Counterpoint, and Form 3

Continues and extends the work of Music 12 to encompass an expanded vocabulary of chromatic tonal harmony, based on Western art music of the 18th and 19th centuries. The course includes analysis of smaller and larger works by such composers as Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Liszt, Brahms, and Wagner; in-depth study of such large-scale topics as sonata form; and written musical exercises ranging from harmonizations of bass and melody lines to original compositions in chorale style.
All MUSI 013 students must register for an appropriate level of MUSI 040C for 0 or 0.5 credit.
Keyboard skills lessons may also be required for some students.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Levinson.

MUSI 014. Harmony, Counterpoint, and Form 4

This course provides continued work in chromatic harmony and 18th-century counterpoint, largely as practiced in Europe. It will primarily take the form of a literature survey. For the first half of the semester, our focus will be on short pieces; during the second of the semester we will study keyboard fugues and other larger-scale works. This course includes a service-learning project.
All MUSI 014 students must register for an appropriate level of MUSI 040D for 0 or 0.5 credit.
Keyboard skills lessons may also be required for some students.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Levinson.

MUSI 017. Jazz Theory

A course designed for the analysis of the harmonic structures of jazz repertoire. This is neither an improvisation nor a performance course.
Prerequisites: MUSI 012 or instructor approval. Basic keyboard skills and fluency on an instrument are required.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 018. Conducting and Orchestration

This course approaches the understanding of orchestral scores from a variety of perspectives. We will study techniques of orchestration and instrumentation, both in analysis of selected works, and in practice, through written exercises. The history, and philosophy of conducting will be examined, and we will work to develop practical conducting technique. Score reading, both at the piano and through other methods, will be practiced throughout the semester.
Prerequisite: MUSI 012, or permission of the instructor.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Hauze.

MUSI 061. Jazz Improvisation

A systematic approach that develops the ability to improvise coherently, emphasizing the Bebop and Hard Bop styles exemplified in the music of Charlie Parker and Clifford Brown.
Prerequisite: Ability to read music and fluency on an instrument.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 062. Proseminar in Jazz Studies: History, Theory, and Improvisation

Designed as an intensive, seminar-style introduction to jazz studies, this course provides an overview of major styles, innovations, and scholarly theories of U.S. jazz through cultural history, music theory, and performance practice. Each unit and case study will draw equally on jazz scholarship and research, analytical listening and transcription, and an in-class performance lab. Individual class sessions will vary among seminar discussions, theory and analysis sessions, guest presentations, and performance workshops on improvisation. Students will complete both individual and group assessments, along with a culminating final project and presentation on a particular period or performer.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

History of Music

MUSI 020. Medieval and Renaissance Music

A survey of European art music from the late Middle Ages to the 16th century. Relevant extramusical contexts will be considered.
Prerequisite: MUSI 011 or the equivalent.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 021. Baroque and Classical Music

This course will survey European art music from the 16th-century Italian madrigal to Haydn’s Creation. Relevant extramusical contexts will be considered.
Prerequisite: MUSI 011 or the equivalent.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 022. 19th-Century European Music

This survey considers European art music against the background of 19th-century Romanticism and nationalism. Composers to be studied include Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Berlioz, Robert and Clara Schumann, Wagner, Verdi, Brahms, Dvorak, Musorgsky, and Chaikovsky.
Prerequisite: MUSI 011 or the equivalent.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Milewski.

MUSI 023. 20th-Century Music

A study of the various stylistic directions in music of the 20th century. Representative works by composers from Debussy, Stravinsky, and Schoenberg through Copland, Messiaen, and postwar composers such as Boulez and Crumb, to the younger generation will be examined in detail.
Prerequisite: MUSI 011 or the equivalent.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Milewski.

MUSI 024. Opera Production Workshop

(Cross-listed as THEA 005)
Opera is a collaborative art form, involving composing, writing, performing, stage directing, choreography and design. In this workshop-based class, students will gain a basic understanding of opera as an art form and experience all aspects of the rehearsal and production process. The class culminates in the performance of an original opera written, directed and performed by faculty and students in collaboration with students from a nearby elementary school.
Open to students with permission of the instructors.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. TBD.

MUSI 025. American Musical Theater

Musical theater has often been considered a quintessentially American genre. But how has it helped Americans to understand America. This survey will trace the genre’s musical and dramatic development and explore representations of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Musicals considered will include: Show Boat, Porgy and Bess, Cradle Will Rock, Oklahoma!, West Side Story, Sweeney Todd and Wicked. Students will have the opportunity to work with the department’s Fall 2014 production of Guys and Dolls.
Prerequisite: MUSI 011 or permission of the instructor.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Baranello.

MUSI 030. Music of Asia

An introduction to selected musical traditions from the vast diversity of Asian cultures. Principal areas will include classical music of India, Indonesian gamelan from Bali and Java, ritual music of Tibet, ancient Japanese court music, Turkish classical music and others. These music will be studied in terms of their technical and theoretical aspects as well as their cultural/philosophical backgrounds. Western musical notation and terminology, including scale types and intervals, will be used. This course fulfills the World Traditions component of the music major.

Eligible for ASIA credit.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 033A. Caribbean/Latin America

This course will focus on the collective genius of the folk, traditional, and popular musics of Cuba and Brazil, such as Afro-Cuban and Afro-Brazilian religious music, changüí, son, danzón charanga, son montuno, timba, samba enredo, samba reggae, afoxé, bossa nova, capoeira, maracatú, mangue beat, pagode, and many others. Selected musical genres will be studied for their sounds and formal characteristics, as well as their cultural origins and histories, and occasionally, comparisons will be drawn with musical styles from the U.S., and musics of the respective immigrant populations in the U.S. will be discussed. The class will feature some hands-on demonstrations by guest artists and the instructor. Materials and assignments will include audio recordings, videos, journal articles, textbook chapters, and other writings, mostly drawn from the field of ethnomusicology.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of traditional music notation and major and minor scales.
Recommended, but not required: Knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese.
This course fulfills the world traditions component requirement for the music major.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 035. Foundations of Ethnomusicology

This course provides an introduction to the history, methodologies, and theories of ethnomusicology. Through review and analysis of past case studies, we will discuss the development of the discipline, engaging with fundamental questions about the relationships among music, culture, scholarship, and advocacy. This course material and assessments will be designed in an interdisciplinary fashion, drawing primarily from music analysis and the social sciences. In addition to individual and collaborative assignments, students will produce ethnographic portfolios of a nearby group or community to be presented at the end of the semester.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 038. Color and Spirit: Music of Debussy, Stravinsky, and Messiaen

A study of 20th-century music focusing on the great renewal of musical expressions, diverging from the Austro-German classic-Romantic tradition, found in the works of these three very individual composers, as well as the connections among them, and the resonance of their music in the work of their contemporaries and successors.
Prerequisite: MUSI 011 or the equivalent.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 075. Special Topics in Music Theater

Available to students participating in the study abroad programs coordinated through Swarthmore in France, Ghana, India, or Japan.
Prerequisites: Consent of the dance program director and the faculty adviser for off-campus study.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 091. Introduction to Performing Arts Education: Music

(Cross-listed as EDUC 071)
How do we learn in the performing arts? This course explores a range of performing arts issues confronting educators in theory and practice. While the focus is music, we will also consider dance and theater with the help of guest lecturers. We will look at primary education in the United States, and we will also touch upon some of the ways music is taught to older students, as well as in other cultures. Students will draw upon their own experiences as teachers and learners. The course will culminate in a collaborative teaching project in which our class as a whole will develop and implement a program of performing arts instruction for children in partnership with an urban public school.
While some prior study of music might be helpful, it is not a prerequisite. This course is open to any student who has taken at least one course in either education or music.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 091C. Special Topics (Music Education)

(Cross-listed as EDUC 091C)
With permission of the instructor, qualified students may choose to pursue a topic of special interest in music education through a field project involving classroom or school practice.
Open to any student who has taken at least one course in music.
Available as a credit/no credit course only.
0.5 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 092. Independent Study

1 credit.

MUSI 093. Directed Reading

1 credit.

MUSI 094. Senior Research Topics in Music

Required of all senior majors as preparation for the senior comprehensive in music.
0.5 credit.
Spring semester.

MUSI 095. Tutorial

Special work in composition, theory, or history.
1 or 2 credits.

MUSI 096. Senior Thesis

1 or 2 credits.

MUSI 099. Senior Honors Recital

Honors music majors who wish to present a senior recital as one of their honors preparations must register for MUSI 099, after consultation with the music faculty. See Honors Program guidelines.
1 credit.

Seminars

MUSI 102. Color and Spirit: Music of Debussy, Stravinsky, and Messiaen

(See MUSI 038)
Prerequisite: MUSI 013 (concurrent enrollment possible by permission of the instructor).
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 103. Mahler and Britten

This course is an intensive study of the music of two seminal 20th-century composers. We will consider song cycles by both composers and their connections to larger genres: Mahler’s symphonies and Britten’s operatic works as well as the War Requiem.
Prerequisites: MUSI 011 to 014; a knowledge of German is recommended.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 104. Chopin

This course will provide an in-depth historical study of Chopin’s music. We will examine the full generic range of Chopin’s compositions, taking into account the various socio-cultural, biographical and historical-political issues that have attached to specific genres. Throughout the semester we will also consider such broader questions as: why did Chopin restrict himself almost entirely to piano composition? How might we locate Chopin’s work within the larger category of 19th-century musical romanticism? What does Chopin’s music mean to us today?
Prerequisites: MUSI 011.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 105. Music and War

For centuries, and across different cultures, music has both served war and illustrated its victories and terror. Music has also provided powerful commentary on war, articulating human pain and protest in equal measure. In this seminar we consider these functions in a range of musical works of the 20th century from popular songs, film shorts, and folk songs from around the world, to music composed in prisons and concentration camps and some of the greatest art music of the 20th century. We will begin our discussion with a brief excursion into previous periods and conclude with an examination of music’s role during the war in Iraq.
Prerequisites: MUSI 011 or permission of the instructor.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Baranello.

MUSI 115. Harmony, Counterpoint, and Form 5

Exploration of a number of advanced concepts in music theory including: the study and analytical application of post-tonal theory (including set theory and neo-Riemannian theory), the structure of the diatonic system, applications of theoretical models to rhythm and meter, and geometric models of musical progression.
Prerequisite: MUSI 014.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Kochavi.

MUSI 118. Introduction to Composition

Prerequisite: MUSI 011 and MUSI 012.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 119. Composition

Repeatable course.
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
1 credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Levinson.

Performance

Note: The following performance courses are for 0.5-course credit per semester.

MUSI 040. Elements of Musicianship

Sight singing and rhythmic and melodic dictation.
Required for all MUSI 011 to 014 students, with or without 0.5 credit. The instructor will place students at appropriate levels.
0.5 or 0.0 credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Hamer.

MUSI 041. Performance (Jazz Ensemble)

0.5 or 0.0 credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Neu. 

MUSI 043. Performance (Chorus)

0.5 or 0.0 credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Gregorio.

MUSI 044. Performance (Orchestra)

0.5 or 0.0 credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Hauze.

MUSI 046. Performance (Wind Ensemble)

0.5 or 0.0 credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Hauze.

MUSI 047. Performance (Chamber Music)

(See guidelines for this course earlier.)
0.5 or 0.0 credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Johns.

MUSI 048. Performance (Individual Instruction)

Please consult the MUSI 048 guidelines on the Music Program website.
0.5 credit.
Each semester.

MUSI 049A. Performance (Balinese Gamelan)

Performance of traditional and modern compositions for Balinese Gamelan (Indonesian percussion orchestra). Students will learn to play without musical notation. No prior experience in Western or non-Western music is required. The course is open to all students.
Two (2) semesters of this course fulfills the World Traditions Component requirement for the music major.
0.5 or 0.0 credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Whitman.

MUSI 049B. Performance (African Dance Repertory Music Ensemble)

Performance of traditional and modern compositions as accompaniment for and collaboration with the development of a dance piece for concert performance.
0.5 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 050. Performance (Chamber Choir)

Students enrolled in MUSI 050 must also be enrolled in MUSI 043 (Performance Chorus).
0.5 or 0.0 credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Gregorio.

MUSI 071. Salsa Dance/Drumming

(See DANC 071)
0.5 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

MUSI 078. Dance/Drum Ensemble

(See DANC 078)
0.5 credit.
Fall 2014. Osayande and guest artists.

Dance

At Swarthmore, dance is a global discourse. The dance and music programs share an integrated approach to composition, history, performance, and theory in lecture/discussion and studio practice courses. We believe this is central to the understanding of dance as an artistic, intellectual, and social inquiry within a liberal arts context.

The Academic Program

The mission of the program is to offer students dance experiences that privilege a merging of embodied practice and history/theory in relation to more than one situated perspective (those listed above). Some courses concentrate on one cultural context only (this is true generally in history, repertory, and technique). Others put a variety of perspectives in conversation (choreographic laboratories, improvisation, history, repertory, and theory).The role of dance as an agent of social change is also present in Swarthmore dance offerings. All dance studies courses engage students in an investigation of the relationship of dance to other arts and areas of thought.

Given the program’s emphasis on developing an awareness of the global nature of dance, study abroad opportunities are seen as a very useful aspect of a student’s undergraduate dance experience. Such study is especially encouraged for dance majors and minors. Study abroad dance programs developed by members of the dance faculty are available in France, Ghana, India, Japan, and United Kingdom. Dance components are also available in programs in Spain and Argentina. Social change engagement is available as an aspect of study abroad experiences in Ghana, India, and Northern Ireland. Additional information regarding study abroad experiences is listed below and can also be found on both the Dance Program and

Off-Campus Study

websites. In order to further enhance student engagement with the field at large, every year the program hosts diverse national and international dance artists and scholars.

Course Major

These prerequisites are strongly recommended for first and second year students and must be completed before the junior year. If a student has not completed all of these prerequisites at the time of an application for a major, but has done good work in one or more courses in the program, the student may be accepted on a provisional basis.

  • DANC 003, 004 or 025A
  • DANC 011. Dance Lab I: Making Dance
  • One dance technique class (in any style) for academic credit

Prerequisite credits for majors: 2.5

The program offers three possible areas of focus for majors; composition, history/theory, or an individual focus. Requirements for each focus are as follows:

Composition

DANC 008. Anatomy: Bones, Muscles, and Movement

DANC 012. Dance Lab II: Making Dance or DANC 013. Dance Composition Tutorial

DANC 022, 023, or 025A - one course

DANC 036, 038, or 075, 077b. or 079 - one course

DANC 048 section 2. Embodying Improvisation: a global cross-disciplinary discourse

DANC 049 (any section), 071, 078, one Western and one non-Western course

DANC 050, 051, 053, 060, or 061 - one or two courses

*DANC 094 or 095 - one course

Total credits in focus:                           6.5–7.5

History/Theory

DANC 022, 023, or 025A - two courses

DANC 036, 038, or 075, 077b. or 079 - two courses

DANC technique and repertory courses - one Western and one non-Western course

*DANC 094/095 - one course

Total credits in focus:                              6.5–7

Individually created focus – See Special Major

Total prerequisites and credits required for majors:     9.0–10.0

*The senior project/thesis is required of all majors.

The dance faculty encourages students to pursue a senior project/thesis that incorporates a comparison or integration of dance with some other creative or performing art (creative writing, music, theater, or visual art), with a community-based learning component, or with another academic discipline of the student’s interest.

Requirements

For majors, regular participation in technique classes throughout a student’s time at Swarthmore and participation in repertory courses for at least four semesters. Students may choose any style of repertory experience as long as they adhere to the distribution guidelines to participate in both Western and non-Western styles. They are also encouraged to seek out service-learning/ community-based learning experiences that incorporate dance. These may substitute for repertory experiences (especially those with a composition focus). Majors are also strongly encouraged to enroll in THEA 003. Fundamentals of Design for Theater Performance and THEA 004B. Lighting Design.

Course Minor

The goal of the course minor in dance is to expose a student to the broad scope of the field. The distribution of required courses for the minor provides students with an introduction to composition, history, technique, and theory and allows them to direct their final credit(s) in the minor toward a specific area of interest. It is also possible for students to align required courses within the minor to reflect that specific interest, if any. Minors will participate in the senior colloquia or individualized meetings with guest artists and instructors and will be encouraged, but not required, to develop an extended paper or a significant dance performance piece as part of their program. Whether they enroll for credit or audit, all dance majors and minors are strongly encouraged to participate in technique and repertory classes each term.

These prerequisites are strongly recommended for first and second year students and must be completed before the junior year. If a student has not completed all of these prerequisites at the time of an application for a minor, but has done good work in one or more courses in the program, the student may be accepted on a provisional basis.

  • DANC 003, 004 or 025A
  • One technique or repertory course for academic credit

Prerequisite credits for minor:                  1.5

Course requirements for minor:

  • DANC 011. Dance Lab I: Making Dance
  • DANC 022, 023, or 025A - one course
  • DANC 036, 038, or 075, 077b. or 079 - one course

Additional courses proposed by the student and approved on an individual basis by the faculty from a combination of composition, history, repertory, technique, and theory courses – 2 credits

Total credits in minor:                                    5

Total prerequisites and credits required for minor:       6.5

Requirements

For minors, regular participation in technique classes throughout a student’s time at Swarthmore and participation in repertory courses for at least two semesters is required. Students may choose any style of repertory experience. They are also encouraged to seek out service-learning/community-based learning experiences that incorporate dance. These may substitute for repertory experiences.

Honors Major

The minimum requirement for admission to the honors major is at least the following 4 courses (3 credits) in dance; an introductory history/theory course (003, 004, or 025A), DANC Lab I: Making Dance (DANC 011), one dance technique class (DANC 040–048, 050–053, or 060–061) and DANC 008. Majors in the Honors Program must also have an overall B grade average before admission. In addition to the guidelines noted later, each honors major will be responsible for the material designated on the reading and video lists for senior honors study available from the department office.

All dance majors in the Honors Program must do three preparations in the department and one outside (in a related or unrelated minor). Two of the departmental preparations will be based on course combinations (one in history or theory and one in composition beyond the introductory-level course DANC 011). The third will take the form of either a senior project (DANC 094) or a senior thesis (DANC 095, 096). The portfolio submitted by each student will include both written materials and a DVD that provides examples of the student’s choreographic and/or performance work at Swarthmore (a maximum of 20 minutes in length).

Each student’s program will include the following:

History and theory. One area of emphasis linking a course from DANC 022, 023 or 025A with a course from DANC 036, 038, or 077B. Each student will demonstrate this integration via a paper written as an attachment. This paper, along with appropriate papers from each history and theory class submitted for preparation, will be sent to the examiner. The written and oral exam for this preparation will consist of a response to three questions set by the examiner.

Composition. Each student may submit a combination of Dance Lab I: Making Dance (DANC 011) plus either Dance Lab II: Making Dance (DANC 012), or Composition Tutorial (DANC 013) two times. The syllabi (where appropriate), a DVD of the final work, and a paper concerning the choreographic process from each class will be submitted to the examiner.

Senior project/thesis. These projects/theses will be individually determined. Each student will be assigned a faculty adviser who will assist the student in the creation of an initial bibliography or videography or both as well as an outline for the project or thesis. It will then be the student’s responsibility to proceed with the work independently.

Total prerequisites and credits required for honors major: 67

Requirements

Regular participation in technique classes throughout a student’s time at Swarthmore and participation in repertory courses for at least two semesters. Students may choose any style of repertory experience. They are also encouraged to seek out service-learning/community-based learning experiences that incorporate dance. These may substitute for repertory experiences.

Honors Minor

Students in the Honors Program who are presenting a major in another discipline and a minor in dance must do one preparation in dance. This preparation will take the form of either composition or history and theory described earlier in the text concerning honors majors in dance. The choice regarding focus for a student’s minor will be determined in consultation with an adviser from the dance faculty.

These prerequisites are strongly recommended for first and second year students and must be completed before the junior year. If a student has not completed all of these prerequisites at the time of an application for an Honors minor, but has done good work in one or more courses in the program, the student may be accepted on a provisional basis.

1. DANC 003, 004, or 025A

2. One technique or repertory course for academic credit

Minors in the Honors Program must also have an overall B grade average before admission. In addition to the guidelines noted below, each honors minor will be responsible for the material designated on a reading and video list for senior honors study available from the department office.

Total prerequisites and credits required for honors minor: 3–4

Requirements

For minors, regular participation in technique classes throughout a student’s time at Swarthmore and participation in repertory courses for at least two semesters is required. Students may choose any style of repertory experience. They are also encouraged to seek out service-learning/community-based learning experiences that incorporate dance. These may substitute for repertory experiences.

Special Major

The program for a special major in dance comprises 4 credits in dance coursework. The two disciplines in this major may be philosophically linked or may represent separate areas of the student’s interest. The faculty encourages students to consider the philosophical links between the two disciplines. Examples of past special majors include: Dance and Anthropology, Dance and Psychology, and Dance and Art. All special majors will design their programs in consultation with a faculty adviser.

Whether they enroll for credit or audit, special majors are required to participate in technique and repertory classes for at least two semesters.

Additional Information Regarding the Dance Program

Dance Technique Courses

In a typical semester, more than 30 hours of dance technique classes are offered on graded levels presenting a variety of movement styles. Technique courses, numbered 040 through 048, 050 to 053, and 060 or 061, may be taken for academic credit or may be taken to fulfill physical education requirements. Advanced dancers are encouraged to consult with instructors regarding placement in level III technique classes. A total of not more than 8 full credits (16 0.5-credit courses) in performance dance technique classes and in music performance classes may be counted toward the degrees of bachelor of arts and bachelor of science. No retroactive credit is given for performance classes.

Dance Program Performance Opportunities

All interested students are encouraged to enroll in repertory classes (DANC 049, 071 or 078) and/or to audition for student and faculty works. These auditions occur several times each semester; dates are announced in classes and in postings outside the dance studios. Formal concerts take place toward the end of each semester; informal studio concerts are scheduled throughout the year.

The Dance Program regularly sponsors guest artist teaching and performance residencies. In addition, the program regularly hosts guest choreographers who work with student ensembles in technique and repertory classes.

Off-Campus Study

Ghana Program

The Dance Program has an ongoing relationship with the International Centre for African Music and Dance and the School of Performing Arts at the University of Ghana in Legon, a suburb of the capital city, Accra. Students choosing to study in Ghana can anticipate opportunities that include a composite of classroom learning, tutorials, some organized travel, and independent study and travel. Beyond credits in dance, music, theater, African studies, and intensive Twi (an Akan language widely spoken in Ghana), a menu of courses at the University of Ghana is also available. Students participating are able to enroll for the equivalent of a full semester’s credit (4 to 5 credits). Community-based learning internships, in dance and other subjects, are also an option. Interested students should contact the director of dance as early as possible for advising purposes and for updated information.

Additional Opportunities

Additional dance study abroad initiatives of a more independent nature are under way in France, India, Japan and Northern Ireland. The program in Northern Ireland can incorporate a strong focus on the arts and social change. Tamagawa University in Machida, near Tokyo, offers course study in classical Japanese and folk dance, taiko drumming, contemporary dance and ballet, and Japanese language. Students are encouraged to discuss these programs with the director of dance.

Introductory Courses

DANC 003. First-Year Seminar: “Shall We Dance?” Dance in the Movies

This first-year seminar will investigate how dance has served as a catalyst and a vehicle for investigating class, gender, race, romance, and technology in films from the early 20th century through the present. Documentaries, narrative, animated, feature-length and short films, produced in the United States and abroad by small independent and major motion picture industry companies, will be included. One video viewing/screening session per week in addition to class meetings. Response and research papers, digital stories, and poster presentations will all be included.
This is a reading and writing intensive course open to all students and fulfills a prerequisite requirement for dance major and minors.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Friedler.

DANC 004. The Arts as Social Change

(Cross-listed as MUSI 006)
This course aims to bring together students with an interest in investigating and investing in social change work through the arts. Our seminar community will engage in discussion of readings and video viewings, will host and visit local leaders from the arts and social change movement, and will engage in community internships as required parts of the course. Papers, journals, grant writing exercises, digital storytelling, and hands-on projects will all be included.
This course is open to all students.
This course fulfills a prerequisite requirement for dance majors and minors.
Eligible for PEAC credit.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Friedler.

DANC 008. Anatomy: Bones, Muscles, and Movement

(Cross-listed as MUSI 008B)
Human musculoskeletal anatomy class that applies anatomy to dance technique and general movement. Covers muscles and bones, kinesiology, strengthening/stretching techniques, and injury identification/management. Theoretical knowledge supported with actual movement analysis in dance studio. Reading, quizzes, midterm, final.
This course fulfills a prerequisite requirement for dance majors.
0.5 credit.
Spring 2015. Malcolm-Naib.

Composition, History, and Theory Courses

DANC 011. Dance Lab I: Making Dance

A study of various basic principles of dance composition and choreography. We will explore/invent movement through experimentations with time, space, and energy qualities, often using improvisation and generative movement “games”. Explorations will be geared toward honing the student’s individual voice through movement, and challenging preconceived ideas of what that voice sounds/looks/feels like. All previous dance/movement experience is welcome; this class is not exclusive to any one genre of movement. Reading, video and live concert viewing, short dance studies, journals, and a final piece for public performance in the Troy dance lab are required.
Prerequisite: Any dance course or permission of the instructor. A course in dance technique must be taken concurrently.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Friedler

DANC 011A. Dance Production Practicum

By individual arrangement with the dance faculty for rehearsal and performance of work in conjuction with dance program courses; 012, 013, 092, or 094.
P.E. credit.
Each semester.

DANC 012. Dance Lab: Making Dance II

An elaboration and extension of the material studied in DANC 011. Stylistically varying approaches to making work are explored in compositions for soloists and groups. Coursework emphasizes using various approaches and methods (e.g., theme and variation, motif and development, structured improvisation, and others). Reading, video and live concert viewing, movement studies, journals, and a final piece for public performance that may include a production lab component are required.
Prerequisites: DANC 011 or its equivalent. A course in dance technique must be taken concurrently.
Students with whom the choreographer works and who commit to 3 hours weekly, may receive PE credit under DANC 011A. Dance Production Practicum.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

DANC 013. Dance Composition: Tutorial

The student enrolling for a tutorial will enter the semester having identified a choreographic project and will be prepared to present material weekly. Projects in any dance style are encouraged. All students proposing tutorials are advised to discuss their ideas with a member of the dance faculty before enrollment. Choreography of a final piece for public performance is required, as are weekly meetings with the instructor and directed readings and video and concert viewings. A journal or research paper may also be required.
Prerequisites: DANC 011 or its equivalent. A course in dance technique must be taken concurrently.
Students with whom the choreographer works and who commit to 3 hours weekly, may receive PE credit under DANC 011A. Dance Production Practicum.
0.5 credit.
Fall 2014 Chakravorty. Spring 2015. Friedler.

DANC 022. History of Dance:Europe’s Renaissance Through 1900

A study of social and theatrical dance forms in the context of various European societies from the Renaissance through thev 19th century, including an overview of the development of ballet. Influential choreographers, dancers, and theorists representative of the periods and of different cultures will be discussed. Reading, writing, in-class presentations, and video viewing in conjunction with learning several period dances will lead to a final research paper.
Prerequisite: DANC 003, 004 or 025A or permission of the instructor.
1 credit
Not offered 2014–2015.

DANC 023. History of Dance: 20th and 21st Centuries

This course is designed to present an overview of 20th- and 21st-century social and theatrical dance forms in the context of Western societies with an emphasis on North America. Focusing on major stylistic traditions, influential choreographers, dancers, and theorists will be discussed. Through readings, video and concert viewings, research projects, and class discussions, students will develop an understanding of these forms in relation to their own dance practice. Two lectures and 1-hour video viewing per week.
Prerequisite: DANC 003, 004, or 025A strongly recommended.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

DANC 025A. Dance and Diaspora

(Cross-listed as SOAN 020J)
Dance is as unconventional but powerful device for studying migration and social mobility. This course will explore the interrelated themes of performance, gender, personhood, and migration in the context of diasporic experiences. By focusing on specific dance forms from Asia, Africa and Latin America, we will examine the competing claims of placeness, globalization, and hybridization on cultural identity and difference. This is a reading and writing intensive course.
Eligible for ASIA or GSST credit.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Chakravorty.

DANC 036. Dancing Identities

This course explores ways that age, class, gender, and race have informed dance, particularly performance and social dance, since 1960. The impact of various cultural and social contexts will be considered. Lectures, readings, and video and concert viewings will be included. Students will be expected to design and participate in dance and movement studies as well as submit written research papers.
Prerequisite: DANC 003, 004, 025A or permission of the instructor.
Eligible for GSST credit.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

DANC 038. Performing Ecstasy Dancing the Sacred

(Cross-listed as RELG 042)
By locating the sacred in the experiences of ecstatic dance and music, the course will specifically examine the evolution of Bhakti (Hindu) and Sufi religious practices from ritual to performance art. By exploring the sacred in relation to social processes of culture and their transformations, it will connect the sacred not only to history, tradition, ritual, spirituality and subjectivity but also to national identity, commodity and tourism in contemporary culture.
It is a reading and writing intensive course.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Chakravorty.

Dance Technique and Repertory Courses

Note: Technique courses (040–048, 050–053, 060, and 061) and Repertory courses (049 [all sections], 071 and 078) may be taken for 0.5 academic credit or may be taken for physical education credit. All dance technique courses numbered 040 to 048 are open to all students without prerequisite. Courses numbered 050 to 058 and 060 to 061 have a prerequisite of either successful completion of the introductory course in that style or permission of the instructor.

DANC 040. Dance Technique: Modern I

This course introduces students to the Horton Technique which was designed with studies to stretch and strengthen different areas of the body. The basic warm up is taught: flat backs, primitive squat, descent and ascent, lateral stretches, release swings and deep lunges. Many of the beginning level studies focus on the Achilles tendon, abdominal muscles and hamstring muscles. Simple combinations are taught to introduce musicality and dynamics to the beginning dancer’s vocabulary.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. King.

DANC 041. Dance Technique: Ballet I

An introduction to the fundamentals of classical ballet vocabulary: correct body placement; positions of the feet, head, and arms; and basic locomotion in the form. If taken for academic credit, concert attendance and two short papers are required.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Sherman.

DANC 043. Dance Technique: African I

African Dance I introduces students to Umfundalai. In a contemporary context, the Umfundalai dance tradition surveys dance styles of African people who reside on the continent of Africa and in the Diaspora. Upon completion of the course, students will gain a beginning understanding of how to approach African dance and the aesthetic principles implicit in African-oriented movement. Students enrolled in DANC 043 for academic credit are required to keep a weekly journal and write two short papers.
Eligible for BLST credit.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Staff

DANC 044. Dance Technique: Tap

This course is available to all tappers, from beginning to advanced. Such forms as soft-shoe, waltz-clog, stage tap, and “hoofin” will be explored. If taken for academic credit, concert attendance and two short papers are required.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Spring 2015. Davis.

DANC 045. Dance Technique: Yoga

Vinyasa Flow/Power Yoga course with a focus on asanas (physical postures) and pranayama (breath control) and relaxation techniques. While this is a vigorous class, the practice is intended to be joyful and energizing with a goal of producing calm in mind and body, a practical knowledge of body alignment, injury prevention, and muscle and skeletal usage. The course will consist of a mix of styles incorporating elements of Ashtanga, Vinyasa Power Yoga, and Byron (AU) Yoga Centre Purna. If taken for academic credit, three short papers are required.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014. Arrow.

DANC 046. Dance Technique: Kathak

The class introduces the hot rhythms (/talas/) and the cool emotions (/rasa/s) of the Indian classical dance art: Kathak. The dancing involves high energy, rapid turns, and fast footwork as well as movement of eyes, hands, neck, and fingers. This syncretic dance style from north India draws on Hindu and Muslim cultural traditions (Bhakti and Sufi) and forms the raw material for the global-pop Bollywood dance. Students who are enrolled for academic credit will be required to write papers and/or create performance texts or choreographies.
Eligible for ISLM credit.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014. Chakravorty.

DANC 047. Dance Technique: Flamenco

This is an introductory flamenco course designed to develop basic movement vocabulary and technique associated with flamenco as a dance form. Flamenco dance involves body attitude and carriage, braceo (arm movements), floreo (movements of fingers and hands), taconeo (footwork), vueltas (turns), and palmas (rhythmic hand clapping technique). A variety of exercises and technique studies in each of these elements will be presented. All forms of flamenco are structured around rhythmic patterns which will be introduced and explored through dance movement and live guitar music. Students will learn choreographic sequences that develop and embody their knowledge of flamenco rhythms and style. Class meets one time weekly and includes 4 Saturday meetings. Students taking DANC 047 for academic credit are required to keep a weekly journal and write two short papers.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014. Gmitter.

DANC 048. Dance Technique: Special Topics in Technique

Intensive study of special topics falling outside the regular dance technique offerings. Topics may include Alexander technique, contact improvisation, jazz, Pilates, and musical theater dance. If taken for academic credit, concert attendance and one or two short papers are required.

Section 2: Embodying Improvisation: a global cross-disciplinary discourse
This studio course will examine improvisation as a tool to create and expand performance potentials. We will explore the practice of improvisation from multiple global perspectives. The course is performance-centered, though we will interrogate practices that occur in a variety of settings, from the proscenium stage to the after-hours niteclub, from the "in front of your mirror when no one is looking" persona to the pop star stadium highly-staged persona, from the quotidian to the ecstatic. As a result, we will begin to ponder the presence of performance in all spaces. We will be informed by a number of dance and movement techniques (for example, contemporary improvisation through shifts of energetic mode, social partner dances—salsa, bachata, swing, contact improvisation, viral sensations—such as twerking), though students do not need to have a background in dance to participate in the class. We have all been accumulating movement information throughout our lives, and your personal accumulation of this information will be our raw material for investigation in class. This course is ideal for any students with interest in exploring performance (dance, theater, music, performance art), transformation, and the immediate moment.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014. Poe.

DANC 049. Performance Dance: Repertory

The various sections of this course offer opportunities for study of repertory and performance practice. Students are required to perform in at least one scheduled dance concert during the semester. Three hours per week. A course in dance technique should be taken concurrently.
Fall Sections
Section 1: Tap
Open to students with some tap experience, this class draws on the tradition of rhythm tap known as “hoofin’.” A new dance is made each semester, working with the varying levels of skill present in the student ensemble. Students will be expected to attend additional ensemble rehearsals.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014. Davis.
Section 4: Taiko
The class will offer experience in traditional or traditionally based Japanese drumming repertory. The relationship between the drumming and its concomitant movement will be emphasized. Open to the general student with performances in December.
Two (2) semesters of this course fulfills the World Traditions Component requirement for the music major.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014. Arrow.
Section 5: Ballet
This class will offer students experience with learning and performing classical ballet, while also being part of the creative process of new choreography. Choreography will be performed in December. Open to advanced students from Ballet III, or with permission of instructor. Auditions will be held at the first class.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014. Chipman-Bloom

Spring Sections

Section 1: Modern
This repertory class will explore the physicality and psychology of performing movement. Movement sources will range form modern dance to hip-hop to contact improvisation. Students need not specialize in any one type of dance to take this course, though it is recommended for intermediate/advanced dancers. Students will be expected to attend additional ensemble rehearsals.
A technique class should be taken concurrently, and Modern III is highly recommended.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Spring 2015. Poe

Section 3: African
Auditions for admission to this course will be held at the first class meeting. Additional information regarding the course is available from the instructor. Resulting choreography will be performed in the spring student concert. Students will be expected to attend additional ensemble rehearsals.
Prerequisite: DANC 043, 078, or permission of the instructor.
Eligible for BLST credit.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Spring 2015. Staff

Section 6: Kathak
This is a moderate level technique course on Kathak. We will work on teen tala or metrical scale of sixteen beats to learn complex rhythmical structures called bols. The various patterns of bols such as tukra, tehai and paran will also be explored. The two aspects of Kathak technique nrtta (abstract movement) and nritya (expressive gestures) will be used for a final composition.
The final composition will be presented in a scheduled student dance concert.
Prerequisite for this course is 048 or prior knowledge of any classical Indian dance forms.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Spring 2015. Chakravorty.

Section 7: Flamenco
This repertory class consists of choreography set to traditional flamenco rhythms with an emphasis on the embodiment of flamenco style and attitude in posture, body and arm positions, movement and footwork. Ongoing technique practice strengthens the dancer’s movement vocabulary and stamina. Communication between dancer and live guitarist is cultivated. Resulting choreography will be performed in the spring student concert. Class meets 1x weekly and includes 5 Saturday meetings. Attendance at additional rehearsals is expected. Students taking DANC 049 for academic credit are required to keep a weekly journal and write one or two short papers.
Prerequisites: 047 or its equivalent, or with permission of instructor.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Spring 2015. Gmitter.

Section 8: Movement Theater Workshop
(See THEA 008)
Prerequisites: THEA 001 or 002, any dance course 040 to 044, or consent of the instructor.
1 credit.

DANC 050. Dance Technique: Modern II

An elaboration and extension of the principles addressed in DANC 040. If taken for academic credit, concert attendance and two short papers are required.
Prerequisite: DANC 040 or its equivalent.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Poe

DANC 051. Dance Technique: Ballet II

An elaboration and extension of the principles addressed in DANC 041. If taken for academic credit, concert attendance and two short papers are required.
Prerequisite: DANC 041 or its equivalent.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Sherman.

DANC 052. Pointe

This course is an intermediate level pointe class, with a focus on developing pointe technique and the strength required to utilize and maintain that technique while dancing en pointe. We will also explore how musicality informs a dancer’s pointe work, both through class exercises and by learning a variation. There is also a possibility that some students will perform in the Spring Student Dance Concert.
Previous Pointe work required.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Chipman-Bloom

DANC 053. Dance Technique: African II

African dance for experienced learners aims to strengthen students’ African dance technique. The course will use the Umfundalai technique allied with neo-traditional West African Dance vocabularies to enhance students’ visceral and intellectual understanding of African dance. Students who take African Dance II for academic credit should be prepared to explore and access their own choreographic voice through movement studies.
Prerequisite: DANC 043.
Eligible for BLST credit.



0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Staff

DANC 060. Dance Technique: Modern III

Continued practice in technical movement skills in the modern idiom, including approaches to various styles. If taken for academic credit, concert attendance and two short papers are required.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Poe

DANC 061. Dance Technique: Ballet III

Advanced level ballet course requiring a strong technical background in ballet technique. Challenges students to grasp advanced movement sequences with a high level of technical proficiency and performance. If taken for academic credit, concert attendance and two short papers are required.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014 and spring 2015. Malcolm-Naib.

DANC 071. Salsa Dance/Drumming

(Cross-listed as MUSI 071)
This course provides an opportunity to learn both the dance and basis for drumming of Cuban salsa, Dominican merengue and Brazilian samba with an emphasis on salsa. Students will gain an understanding and practice of pulse, meter and the polyrhythmic structure underlying Afro/Caribbean music generally; hand techniques for conga; and improvisation and composition for both the dance and drumming. We will use a form of “street” notation in order to write/read/remember the various rhythms.
No prerequisite required and no experience in dance or music necessary.
0.5 credit or P.E. credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

DANC 073. Arts Administration for Performance

This course is available to students participating in various dance study abroad programs.
By arrangement with the Director of Dance.
1 credit.
Each semester.

Dance 073B. Community Arts Internship

This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct a supervised internship at various arts organizations in Chester and Philadelphia following an introduction to such work through enrollment in Dance 004./Music 006. The Arts as Social Change. Individual placements will be arranged with the assistance of a faculty supervisor. Students will devote a minimum of six hours per week to their internships. Reflective papers and reports will be required.
Prerequisite or co-requisite: DANC 004/MUSI 006 or with permission of instructor.


0.5 credit
Offered every semester.

DANC 074. Scenography for Dance Theater Performance

Available to students participating in the study abroad programs coordinated by Swarthmore in Ghana, India, or Japan.
Prerequisites: THEA 004B and THEA 014.
1 credit.
Each semester.

DANC 075. Special Topics in Dance Theater

Available to students participating in the study abroad programs coordinated through Swarthmore.
By arrangement.
Prerequisites: 003, 004, 011, and consent of the Director of Dance.
1 credit.
Each semester.

DANC 077B. Anthropology of Performance

(Cross-listed as SOAN 077B)
This course will introduce various approaches to the study of visual anthropology as it relates to movement, body, culture, and power. It will examine theoretical approaches ranging from semiotics of the body, communication theory, and phenomenology to the more recent approaches drawing on performance, postcolonial, post-structural, and feminist theories. It will also examine how anthropological issues in dance or performance are closely tied to issues of modernity, regional and national identity, gender, and politics. Various ethnographies and literature from dance studies, media and film studies, and feminist studies will be included in the course material. It will also require students to view videos to engage in visual analysis.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

DANC 078. Dance/Drum Ensemble

(Cross-listed as MUSI 078)
A repertory class in which students will learn, rehearse and perform traditional Ghanaian dances and drumming, and a contemporary movement/rhythm piece consisting of both ‘found’ percussion ‘discovered’ movement. Participants will be encouraged to both play the rhythms and learn the dance/movement. Students will be expected to attend additional ensemble rehearsals.
Performance: LPAC main stage, first week of December as part of the fall student dance concert.
Jeannine Osayande (dance) and Wesley Rast and Alex Shaw (drumming) are guest artists.
Eligible for BLST credit.
0.5 academic credit or P.E. credit.
Fall 2014. Osayande and guest artists.

DANC 079. Dancing Desire in Bollywood Films

(Cross-listed as SOAN 079B)
This course will explore the shifts in sexuality and gender constructions of Indian women from national to transnational symbols through the dance sequences in Bollywood. We will examine the place of erotic in reconstructing gender and sexuality from past notions of romantic love to desires for commodity. The primary focus will be centered on approaches to the body from anthropology and sociology to performance, dance, and film and media studies.
Eligible for ASIA, FMST, or GSST credit.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

DANC 092. Independent Study

Available on an individual or group basis, this course offers students an opportunity to do special work with performance or compositional emphasis in areas not covered by the regular curriculum. Students will meet with supervising faculty on a weekly basis and present performances and/or written reports to the faculty supervisor, as appropriate. Permission must be obtained from the program director and from the supervising faculty.
Students with whom the student choreographer works and who commit to 3 hours rehearsal time weekly, may receive PE credit under DANC 011A. Dance Production Practicum. The project culminates in a public performance.
1 credit.
Each semester. Staff.

DANC 093. Directed Reading

Available on an individual or group basis, this course offers students an opportunity to do special work with theoretical or historical emphasis in areas not covered by the regular curriculum. Students will meet with a faculty supervisor weekly and present written reports to the faculty supervisor. Permission must be obtained from the program director and from the supervising faculty.
1 credit.
Each semester. Staff.

DANC 094. Senior Project

Intended for seniors pursuing the special major or the major in course or honors, this project is designed by the student in consultation with a dance faculty adviser. The major part of the semester is spent conducting independent rehearsals in conjunction with weekly meetings under an adviser’s supervision. The project culminates in a public presentation and the student’s written documentation of the process and the result. An oral response to the performance and to the documentation follows in which the student, the adviser, and several other members of the faculty participate. In the case of honors majors, this also involves external examiners. Proposals for such projects must be submitted to the dance faculty for approval during the semester preceding enrollment.
Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in an advanced-level technique course or demonstration of advanced-level technique.
Students with whom the choreographer works and who commit to 3 hours weekly, may receive PE credit under DANC 011A. Dance Production Practicum.
1 credit.
Each semester. Staff.

DANC 095, 096. Senior Thesis

Intended for senior majors or minors, the thesis is designed by the student in consultation with a dance faculty adviser. The major part of the semester is spent conducting independent research in conjunction with weekly tutorial meetings under an adviser’s supervision. The final paper is read by a committee of faculty members or, in the case of honors majors, by external examiners who then meet with the student for evaluation of its contents. Proposals for a thesis must be submitted to the dance faculty for approval during the semester preceding enrollment.
1 or 2 credits.
Each semester. Staff.