French and Francophone Studies

HAILI KONG, Professor and Chair
ELEONORE BAGINSKI, Administrative Coordinator
BETHANNE SEUFERT, Administrative Assistant

French
JEAN-VINCENT BLANCHARD, Professor
MICHELINE RICE-MAXIMIN, Associate Professor 2
CARINA YERVASI, Associate Professor
ALEXANDRA GUEYDAN-TUREK, Assistant Professor
BENJAMIN CHEREL, Lecturer
ARNAUD COURGEY, Visiting Lecturer

Language Resource Center
MICHAEL JONES, Language Resource Center Director
ALEXANDER SAVOTH, Language Resource Center Technologist

 

2 Absent on leave, spring 2015.

French and Francophone Studies

In French and Francophone Studies, you will learn French and acquire global competence in the Francophone world. Students are introduced to contemporary France and a variety of countries such as Algeria and Senegal. They can expand their knowledge of the diversity of French-speaking cultures by developing an appreciation of literary value and filmic expression. Our courses also pay careful attention to the major social and political developments that have shaped France, and its former colonies, thus providing an opportunity to understand the forces underlying these various cultures, literatures, and films. Students in our program explore interests as diverse as critical theory, film studies, gender studies, postcolonial studies, or the Islamic world, and work directly with primary sources in their original language.

The Academic Program

French and francophone studies is offered as a major or minor in the Course Program and as a major or minor in honors. The prerequisite to take upper-level courses (numbered 20 and higher) for both course and honors students is FREN 014 or 015, the equivalent, or evidence of special competence.

All French and francophone studies majors and minors, including students preparing a secondary school certificate, are required to complete a study abroad program in a French-speaking country.

Majors and minors in the Course and Honors Programs are expected to be proficient in spoken and written French to do the larger part of their work in French, i.e., discussions and papers in courses and seminars and all oral and written examinations, including oral defense of the senior paper and Honors examinations.

Course Major

Requirements

  1. Take eight advanced courses or seminars numbered 014 or above for a minimum of 8 credits. Note that AP, IB credits will not count toward the major. FREN 016 can only count once to fulfill the major credit requirement.
  2. Off-campus study is required for all majors. Students who participate in preapproved programs may only count 3 credits toward their major. See the “

    Off-Campus Study

    ” section for rules on transfer of credit.

  3. Take one advanced course with a Francophone component.
  4. Take Senior Colloquium (FREN 091) in the senior year. This includes the writing of an original, independent research paper of 30 pages on a topic chosen in discussion with the senior colloquium professor and adviser or one other professor in the program. The defense of the paper with the entire French and Francophone faculty takes place at the end of the fall semester.

French and Francophone Studies also offers courses in French literature in translation, but no more than one such course may count to satisfy the requirements in the major.

To graduate with a major in French and Francophone studies, students must have a grade average of C or better within the discipline, have studied in a French-speaking country, and have completed our culminating exercise, described above.

Acceptance Criteria

To be accepted as a course major, students must have taken French 014 or the equivalent, earning grades no less than a C.

Course Minor

Requirements

  1. Complete 5 credits in courses or seminars numbered 014 or above. Three or four of these credits must be completed on the Swarthmore campus (See #2 below). Note that AP and IB credits will not count toward the minor. FREN 016 can only count once to fulfill the minor credit requirement.
  2. Minors are strongly encouraged to complete at least a six-week summer program of study in a French-speaking country. Students who participate in preapproved programs may only count two credits toward their minor. See the study abroad section for rules on transfer of credit.
  3. Complete Senior Colloquium (FREN 091) in the senior year, which includes the writing of an original, independent research paper of 20 pages on a topic chosen in discussion with the senior colloquium professor.

French and Francophone studies also offers courses in French literature in translation, but no more than one such course may count to satisfy the requirements in the minor.

To graduate with a minor in French and Francophone studies, you must have a grade average of C or better within the discipline, studied in French-speaking country, and have completed FREN 091 Senior Colloquium.

Acceptance Criteria

To be accepted as a course minor, you must have taken French 014 or the equivalent, earning grades no less than a C.

Honors Major

Requirements

Majors in the Honors Program are expected to complete the requirements of majors in course, including taking Senior Colloquium (FREN 091) in the senior year.

  1. Take eight advanced courses or seminars numbered 014 or above for a minimum of 8 credits. Note that AP and IB credits will not count toward the honors major. FREN 016 can only count once to fulfill the honors major credit requirement.
  2. Study abroad in a francophone country, for one semester is required for all honors majors. See the study abroad section for rules on transfer of credit.
  3. Take one advanced course with a Francophone component.
  4. Take Senior Colloquium (FREN 091) in the senior year. This includes the writing of an original, independent research paper of 30 pages on a topic chosen in discussion with the senior colloquium professor and adviser or one other professor in the program. The defense of the paper with the entire French and Francophone faculty takes place at the end of the fall semester.

Complete at least one advanced course (above FREN 015) before taking a seminar.

Work on three preparations, two of which must be done through seminars while the third may be a seminar, a two-credit thesis, or an approved paired course preparation.

French and Francophone Studies also offers courses in French literature in translation but no more than one such course may count to satisfy the requirements in the honors major.

The Honors Exam for Majors and Preparations

Majors in the Honors Program must do three preparations (consisting of six units of credit). Two of the preparations must be done through seminars chosen from the list below. The third preparation may be a seminar, a two-credit thesis, or an approved paired course preparation.

Mode of Examination:

A three-hour written examination, and a one-half hour oral examination, both in French, will be required for each preparation.

Acceptance Criteria

Candidates are expected to have a “B” average in course work both in the department and at the College, have taken FREN 004 or the equivalent, and have demonstrated interest in and aptitude for the study of literature or culture in the original language.

Honors Minor

Requirements

Minors in the Honors Program are expected to complete the requirements of minors in course, including taking Senior Colloquium (FREN 091) in the senior year.

  1. Complete 5 credits in courses or seminars numbered 014 or above. Three of these credits must be completed on the Swarthmore campus. Note that AP and IB credits will not count toward the minor. FREN 016 can only count once to fulfill the minor credit requirement.
  2. Complete at least a six-week program of study in a French-speaking country. It is strongly recommended that honors minors spend at least one semester abroad. See the study abroad section for rules on transfer of credit.
  3. Complete Senior Colloquium (FREN 091) in the senior year, which includes the writing of an original, independent research paper of 20 pages on a topic chosen in discussion with the senior colloquium professor.
  4. Complete at least one advanced course (above FREN 015) before taking a seminar.
  5. Work on one two-credit seminar preparation or an approved paired course preparation.

French and Francophone studies also offers courses in French literature in translation but no more than one such course may count to satisfy the requirements in the honors minor.

The Honors Exam for Minors and Preparations

Minors must do a single, two-credit seminar preparation (consisting of two units of credit) or an approved paired course preparation.

Mode of Examination

A three-hour written examination, and a one-half hour oral examination, both in French, will be required for the preparation.

Acceptance Criteria

Candidates are expected to have a “B” average in course work both in the department and at the College, have taken FREN 004 or the equivalent, and have demonstrated interest in and aptitude for the study of literature or culture in the original language.

Thesis / Culminating Exercise

The culminating exercise in French and Francophone studies consists of completing FREN 091 Senior Colloquium in which you will write an independent research thesis of 20–30 pages and defend it in front of a panel of faculty members.

Application Process Notes for the Major or the Minor

In addition to the process described by the Dean’s Office and the Registrar’s Office for how to apply for a major, we also ask that you speak with the French and Francophone Studies section head or one of your professors in French and Francophone Studies to discuss your options.

If after applying you are deferred, you may apply again in the fall by addressing the reasons for your deferral.

Off-Campus Study

Study abroad programs are vital to the French and Francophone program. Majors may count up to 3 credits toward their French major. Minors may count 2 of these credits toward their French minor. To receive more than one credit, students must take a 1-credit course in French immediately upon their return. Students should contact a French faculty member to obtain the current list of preapproved programs. Students wishing to seek credit from other disciplines must consult the rules in the appropriate credit-granting department. There are also other options to study abroad available to students who have completed course work above the equivalent of fourth semester.

Any student attending a preapproved program in a non-francophone country, and planning to enroll in a French course there, may petition for one credit upon their return to campus. To earn this credit, students must take a one-credit French course in the semester immediately following their return to campus.

Preapproved Summer Programs

Any student may study in a preapproved summer program that is at least 6 weeks long and earn 1 credit in MLL (French). Only Minors in French and Francophone studies may have this credit count towards the completion of their course requirements.

Research and Service-Learning Opportunities

Both independent research and service-learning student-teaching are important ways to continue using your language and critical analysis skills.

Academic Year Opportunities

Each semester MLL offers a Service-Teaching Pedagogy course in which students teach French to local elementary students after or while completing FREN 014 (or 4th semester course of foreign language equivalent). It offers first-hand experience teaching in the classroom and provides training in classroom management, writing lesson plans, and effective use of communicative method language instruction. Student-teachers share common curricular goals, use a communicative method without a textbook, and teach exclusively in the target language. To enhance the student-teachers’ professionalism, this course includes a weekly pedagogy session for help with learning how to prepare lessons with goal-oriented curriculum, teaching practice, debriefing on the weeks’ teaching, and discussion of readings about foreign language acquisition, methodologies, and approaches.

Summer Opportunities

Students are encouraged to use the summer to travel to Francophone countries and explore research for their senior thesis papers. Please speak with French and Francophone studies faculty to find out about options for doing this summer work.

Teacher Certification

Students may choose to use French and Francophone studies as a specialization in a teacher certification program or for a special major in educational studies. Although students may develop their own course of study, they must complete FREN 015, or the equivalent, and study abroad for at least one semester in a French-speaking country.

Life After Swarthmore

Opportunities for a major/minor in French and Francophone studies after graduation are varied. Our curriculum provides students with valuable skills in cultural analysis, communication in another language, and the ability to understand and adapt to cross-cultural situations. Many majors and minors in French and Francophone studies continue their research with Fulbright awards, go to graduate school, law school, and medical school, and follow diverse career paths in teaching, journalism, business, and NGOs. Recent French and Francophone alumni who are Fulbright recipients are continuing their studies in North Africa and the Middle East; those who have gone to graduate school are studying library science, ethnomusicology, French history, public policy, educational policy, and public health. Many alumni are in education, law, business, journalism, medicine, the arts, and international affairs, etc.

Courses

The following courses are taught in French. For courses on French and Francophone content taught in English, see the section on Literatures in Translation above.
# = Francophone

FREN 001–002, 003. Intensive French

Students who start in the 00l–002 sequence must complete 002 to receive credit for 001.
For students who begin French in college. Designed to impart an active command of the language. Combines the study of grammar with intensive oral practice, writing, and readings in literary and expository prose. FREN 001 is offered in the fall semester only.
1.5 credits.

FREN 001. Intensive First Year of French

Fall 2014. Blanchard, Rice-Maximin, Courgey.

FREN 002. Intensive First Year of French

Spring 2015. Gueydan-Turek, Cherel, Courgey.

FREN 003. Intensive Intermediate French

FREN 003 is offered in the fall semester only.
Fall 2014. Gueydan-Turek, Cherel.

FREN 014. Advanced French: La France et le monde francophone contemporains 1 (W)

Offered each semester, this course gives students the opportunity to develop French language skills through explorations of culture and society in France and the Francophone World. Controverses (textbook) will be used for learning the art of writing in French. Particular attention will be paid to oral communication, grammar review, and writing skills. FREN 003 or placement required.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Cherel.
Spring 2015. Blanchard.

FREN 015. Advanced French: La France et le monde francophone contemporains 2

Offered each semester, this course gives students the opportunity to further develop French language skills through the study of articles, essays, and images. Engage in reading, discussing, and writing about cultural and visual texts selected from ads, newspapers, literature, television shows, comic strips, videos, and film from France and the Francophone World. Writing skills will be addressed using the second half of Controverses (textbook). Particular attention will be paid to oral and written communication and cultural analysis. FREN 004, FREN 014, or placement required.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Yervasi.
Spring 2015. Yervasi.

FREN 016. French Conversation

A 0.5-credit conversation course concentrating on the development of the students’ ability to speak French. May be repeated once for credit with a different instructor, but can only count once to fulfill major/minor credit requirement.
Prerequisite: For students previously in FREN 015 Advanced French 2, or the equivalent Placement Test score.
0.5 credit.
Fall 2014. Gueydan-Turek.
Spring 2015. Cherel.

FREN 040. Panorama de la Littérature française

This course is designed to provide students with a broad knowledge of French literature, from the Renaissance to the present. Among the authors included on the syllabus are: Corneille, Graffigny, Balzac, Proust and Genet. Students will read works in their entirety, discuss their significance in class, and listen to short lectures to situate the readings in a historical and cultural context.
1 credit. Fall 2015. Yervasi.

FREN 024. Foreign Language Teaching and Pedagogy

(Cross-listed as EDUC 072)
This course has two elements that are developed together throughout the course of the semester. Students can serve the Swarthmore community by teaching a foreign language to local elementary school students in an after-school program that meets two times/week. Students must teach for the entire 6-week session, two days per week. During the evening pedagogy sessions held on campus, we will discuss writing weekly lesson plans, foreign language acquisition in children, teaching methodologies and approaches. We use a common goal-oriented curriculum among all the languages. Students must register for the language or educational studies course that they will be teaching and for a service time (A) M/W or (B) T/Th.
0.5 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

FREN 043. Ecrire le Moi/Writing the Self

Reading the texts by authors of various parts of the Francophone world who, through their confessions, memoirs, autobiographies, auto-fictions, journals, etc., narrate different moments of their life. We will explore the role of history, social class, language, education, race, colonial past, in the construction of their subjectivity and identity, and will also read their texts as keys to the understanding of the cultures and societies they inhabit. Parallel reading of studies on the various forms of the autobiographical genre will inform us on the writings of authors such as Rousseau, Sartre, Ferraoun, Bouraoui, Nothomb, Genet, Lefevre, Zoble, Condé, Pineau, Maximin, Lahens, Sarraute, Duras. In French.
Eligible for BLST.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Rice-Maximin.

FREN 045C. Le Monde Francophone

Spring 2016. Rice-Maximin

FREN 045D. Le monde francophone : African Cinema#

This course is an introduction to the history of Francophone West African cinemas. Students will study the colonial and postcolonial history and culture of this region, be introduced to key film concepts, and develop their ability to do in-depth film analysis. Student must attend weekly screenings.
Eligible for BLST credit.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Yervasi.

FREN 057. Bande dessinée, nouvelle Manga et romans graphiques

The bande dessinée, the Francophone analog to comics, has evolved alongside contemporary youth culture to become a locus for expressions of sociocultural and aesthetic changes, as well as antiestablishment discourses. In the context of issues such as social class, cultural diversity, and feminity/masculinity, this course will connect canonical comics (such as Asterix and Tintin) with more current cutting-edge forms including la nouvelle Manga and graphic novels from Rwanda, Algeria, Lebanon and Iran.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Gueydan-Turek.

FREN 091. Senior Colloquium:

This course will be dedicated to discussions of the various topics chosen by majors and minors for their senior thesis. Although this course is required of French/Francophone majors and minors, it is open to other advanced students.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Gueydan-Turek.
Spring 2016. Yervasi.

FREN 093. Directed Reading
FREN 096. Thesis

Seminars

FREN 111. Le Désir colonial: représentations de la différence dans l’imaginaire français#

This course addresses how the colonial encounter has shaped modern perceptions of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality through the production, circulation and consumption of deformed images of its colonial subjects. From noble savages and whimpering slaves to hideous monsters and seductive harem girls, we will examine the dynamics of representation embedded in colonial narrations and visual constructions of the “Other,” focusing on conceptualizations of power as they relate to race, sexual politics and the gendering of the colonial subject. Primary texts include literature of the slave trade, orientalist fictions and photographs, colonial films, museum exhibitions and world’s fairs, and contemporary works of fiction that deal with the legacy and sometimes continue the colonial desire.
Eligible for BLST or GSST credit.
2 credits.
Fall 2016. Gueydan-Turek.

FREN 112. Le Monde comique de Molière

This seminar is designed to acquaint students with the major works of Molière and 17th-century culture. We will investigate: Molière’s political relationship with Louis XIV at Versailles, the discourse of early modern feminism of the précieuses and the femmes savantes; the critique of religious hypocrisy, and the influence of early modern notions of anthropology, notably medicine, on Molière’s notions of selfhood. These aspects will be brought forward through close attention to the poetics of comedy and the art of the comedian.
2 credits.
Spring 2015. Blanchard.

FREN 180. Honors Thesis
FREN 199. Senior Honors Study

Courses with a Francophone component are marked with a #.

French Courses and Seminars Not Currently Offered

FREN 022. Panorama du cinéma français et francophone#
FREN 044. Tyrants and Revolutionaries
FREN 045A. Le Monde francophone: Postcolonial cities in the Francophone World#
FREN 046. Poésies d’écritures françaises#
FREN 054. Cinéma français: jeunesse et résistance
FREN 056. Ces femmes qui écrivent/Reading French Women
FREN 058. The Representation of Alterity in French Literature and Cinema#
FREN 104. Le Roman du XIXe siècle
FREN 106. La Modernité
FREN 108. Littérature et cinéma moderne et contemporain: La question de représentation
FREN 110. Histoires d’îles#
FREN 115. Paroles de femmes#
FREN 116 Théâtre Francophone
LITR 061FJ. Manga, Bande Dessinée, and the Graphic Novel: A Transnational Study of Graphic Fiction
LITR 071F. French Cultural and Critical Theory
LITR 078F. Francophone Cinema