English Literature

NATHALIE ANDERSON, Professor
ELIZABETH BOLTON, Professor 3
NORA JOHNSON, Professor and Chair
PETER J. SCHMIDT, Professor
PHILIP M. WEINSTEIN, Professor 6
CRAIG WILLIAMSON, Professor
ANTHONY FOY, Associate Professor
JILL GLADSTEIN, Associate Professor and Director of Writing Associates Program
BAKIRATHI MANI, Associate Professor 1
RACHEL BUURMA, Assistant Professor 3
LARA COHEN, Assistant Professor
ERIC SONG, Assistant Professor
JOHN PATRICK LEARY, Visiting Assistant Professor (part time) 5
CHRISTOPHER CASTELLANI, Visiting Instructor (part time) 5
GREGORY FROST, Visiting Instructor (part time)
DALE MEZZACAPPA, Visiting Instructor (part time) 5

1 Absent on leave, fall 2013.
3 Absent on leave, 2013–2014.
5 Fall 2013.
6 Spring 2014.

This department offers courses in English literature, American literature, Native American literature, Anglophone literature, Asian and Asian American literatures, gay and lesbian literatures, drama, film, creative writing, critical theory, and journalism. The departmental curriculum includes the intensive study of works of major writers, major periods of literary history, and the development of literary types; it also provides experience in several critical approaches to literature and dramatic art and explores certain theoretical considerations implicit in literary study, such as the problematics of canon formation and the impact of gender on the creation and reception of literary works.
Students who plan to do graduate work, to follow a course of professional training, or to seek teacher certification in English should see a member of the department for early help in planning their programs, as should students who plan to include work in English literature in a special or cross-disciplinary major, or in a program with a concentration.

Requirements and Recommendations

First-Year Seminars

The English Literature Department offers two kinds of first-year seminars. There are first-year seminars in composition and first-year seminars in literature. ENGL 001F is a first-year seminar in composition (academic writing.) These count as Humanities writing (W) courses but do not count towards a major or minor in English literature. All first-year seminars (both in composition and in literature) are limited to 12 students. First-year seminars in English literature are numbered ENGL 008A-Z and ENGL 009A-Z. These literature seminars are designed to emphasize in-depth study of literary texts from a variety of perspectives, with careful attention to writing and maximum opportunity for class discussion. All first-year seminars in English count as Humanities W courses. Students may take only one first-year seminar in literature from the English Department, but they are welcome to take a first-year seminar in composition and a first-year seminar in English literature.

Core Courses

We also offer core courses (CC), which are especially recommended for first- and second-year students, though they are open to all. CCs pay special attention to one or more of the following: close reading, historical context, secondary (i.e., theoretical or critical) readings, or genre. They are distinguished by their pedagogical emphasis rather than by course topic per se. Students are welcome to take more than one CC.
Students considering a major in English are strongly urged to take a first-year seminar in literature and one or two additional English courses during the sophomore year. Students need at least two graded literature courses from English to apply for the major. A core course or another mid-level English literature course is especially recommended. ENGL 070A–070Kwill not suffice as the second course when applying for a major. ENGL 005 Journalism Workshop does not count toward a major or minor in English literature. Majors and prospective majors should consult a member of the English Department for information about courses in other departments complementary to their work in English; work in foreign languages is especially recommended.

Course Major

The work of a major in course consists of a minimum of nine units of credit in the department including

  • ENGL 099 (taken fall of the senior year, no exceptions),
  • at least three units in literature written before 1830 (such courses are marked with a *),
  • and at least three in literature written after 1830.

Courses marked with a *** may be counted as pre-1830 or post-1830 but not both. First-Year Seminars (ENGL 008 and 009A through Z), creative writing, journalism classes and AP credits do not count as part of the pre- or post-1830 requirement. Creative writing credits and/or a validated AP credit of 4 or 5 in Literature (not “Language”) count towards the credits needed for a major in English Literature; however, ENGL 005 (Journalism) does not.

Course Minor

The work of a minor in course consists of a minimum of five units of literature credit in the department including

  • at least one unit in literature written before 1830 (such courses are marked with a *),
  • and at least one in literature written after 1830.

Courses marked with a *** may be counted as pre-1830 or post-1830 but not both. First-Year Seminars in literature (ENGL 008 and 009 A through Z), creative writing, journalism classes, and an AP credit in Literature do not count as part of the pre- or post-1830 requirement. Creative writing credits and/or a validated AP credit of 4 or 5 in Literature (not “Language”) count towards the credits needed for a minor in English Literature; however, ENGL 005 (Journalism) does not.

Honors Major

Majors in English who seek a degree with honors will, in the spring of their sophomore year, propose for external examination a program consisting of four fields: three in English and one in a minor.
The three preparations in the major (constituting six units of credit) will be constituted as follows:

  • all three preparations will normally be done through seminars (if approved by the department, one preparation may be a thesis or creative writing portfolio);
  • the program must include at least one Group I and one Group II seminar.

Honors majors, as part of their overall work in the department, must meet the general major requirement of 9 credits in English literature, including three units of credit in literature written before 1830 and three units of credit in literature written after 1830. First-year seminars, creative writing, and journalism classes do not count as pre- or post-1830 classes.

Students interested in pursuing honors within a faculty-approved interdisciplinary major, program, or concentration that draws on advanced English courses or seminars should see the chair for early help in planning their programs.

Honors Minor

Minors must do a single, two-credit preparation in the department, normally by means of a seminar (or under special circumstances, a creative writing portfolio); the thesis option is only available to majors.

Minors are required to do a total of at least five units of work in English (including their honors preparation), with at least one pre- and one post-1830 credit. First-year seminars, creative writing, and journalism classes do not count as pre- or post-1830 classes.

Double Majors

Students may, with the department’s permission, pursue a double major either as part of the Course or Honors Program. Double majors must fulfill all the major requirements in both departments.
For a double major in honors, one of the majors is used as the honors major and the other is often used as the honors minor. See the department chair for further details.

Special Major

Designed by the student in consultation with faculty advisers. If English is the central department, students must fulfill most of the regular requirements and have a minimum of 5 English Department credits as part of the special major. At least one of the 5 credits must be a pre-1830 course and one a post-1830 course.

Students must consult with the various departments or programs involved in the special major and have all approve the plan of study. Only one integrative comprehensive exercise is required.

Students may also do a special honors major with four related preparations in different departments.

Major with a Creative Writing Emphasis

Students who want to major in English literature with an emphasis in creative writing—whether course or honors majors—must complete three units of creative writing in addition to the usual departmental requirements of pre- and post-1830 units. The creative writing credits will normally consist of either

  • three workshops (ENGL 070A, B, C, D, E, G, H, or J)

OR

  • two workshops (ENGL 070A, B, C, D, E, G, H, or J) and ENGL 070K, Directed Creative Writing Projects

Students may count towards the program no more than one workshop offered by departments other than English literature. Admission into the program will depend upon the quality of the student’s written work and the availability of faculty to supervise the work. Students who are interested in the program are urged to talk both with the department chair and with one of the department faculty who regularly teach the workshops.

Note: Creative writing and journalism classes do not count as pre- or post-1830 classes. ENGL 070A, 070B, 070C, 070H, and 070K are CR/NC courses (not graded).

For a more detailed description of the English Literature Creative Writing program and its history, see the English Department website or handouts available in the department office.

Thesis / Culminating Exercise

Course Majors

English 099, Senior Course Majors Colloquium, is open only to senior English literature course majors and required for them to take. It offers a structured and supportive environment for students writing their senior essays. The course will feature a mix of literature, criticism, theory, and methodology, plus guest visits by other members of the English Literature Department and possibly others, with the opportunity for students to discuss central issues in the field of literary and cultural history in preparation for their research and writing.
Under some circumstances a course major may elect to write a thesis. See the description under ENGL 098.

Honors Majors

Honors majors will prepare a senior honors essay and take an Honors exam for each of their three English honors preparations.
Students who wish either to write a thesis or pursue a creative writing project under faculty supervision as part of the Honors Program must submit proposals to the department; the number of these ventures the department can sponsor each year is limited. Students who propose creative writing projects will normally be expected to have completed at least one writing workshop as part of, or as a prelude to, the project; the field presented for examination will thus normally consist of a 1-credit workshop plus a 1-credit directed creative writing project. For further information, including deadlines for directed creative writing proposals, see rubric under ENGL 070K.

Application Process Notes for the Major or the Minor

Applications for the major in English literature are considered in the spring of the sophomore year. Each student will, under the guidance of a faculty adviser, present a reasoned plan of study for the last two years. This plan will be submitted to the department and will be the basis of the departmental discussion of the student’s application for a major. The plan will include a list of proposed courses and seminars that will satisfy the requirements for either the Course or Honors Program and a rationale for the program of study.

Such applications are normally considered at a meeting of all department members. Each student is discussed individually. The department has never established a minimum grade point average, nor are certain courses weighted in this discussion more heavily than others. A record of less than satisfactory work in English would certainly give us pause, however, unless it were attributable to circumstances other than academic ability. Students who want to include the English major as part of a double major must have a record of strong work in both majors as well as in other courses.

Students are eligible for seminars in the department regardless of their choice of honors or course majors. Admission to seminars will be based on a student’s prior academic work, her/his ability to interact well in a small class situation, and the shape of the larger course of study articulated in the Sophomore Plan. For oversubscribed seminars, priority will normally be given to honors majors and minors.

The minimum requirement for consideration for the major, minor, or admission to any seminar is the completion of at least two graded courses in English, not counting creative writing workshops. Applications for the major will be deferred until two graded literature courses are completed.

Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate Credit

A maximum of 2 credits may be awarded for combined AP and IB work.

AP Credit

Students will receive credit for AP scores of 4 or 5 in English Lit/Comp which will count both toward graduation and toward the major requirements. AP credit is given for scores of 4 or 5 in English Lang/Comp but count only toward graduation and not toward the major requirements. If students take both exams and receive scores of 4 or 5 they will receive one credit for each exam.

IB Credit

A maximum of one AP Literature credit is given for a score of 6 or 7 on the Higher Level English examination in the International Baccalaureate program. This credit will count both toward graduation and toward the major requirements.

Off-Campus Study and Transfer Credit

Students wishing to study away from Swarthmore should consult with the department chair far enough in advance of such study to effect proper planning of a major or minor. In determining which courses of study will meet department criteria for requirements or credit toward a major or minor, the department will rely both on its experience in evaluating the work of students returning from these programs and on careful examination of course descriptions, syllabi, and schedules. Course credits for literature in English should be approved before you leave, but no course credits are finally awarded until you consult with the department upon your return to Swarthmore.
To find out who the course credits consultant is for English, contact the department chair.

Teacher Certification

English majors may complete the requirements for English certification through a program approved by the State of Pennsylvania. For further information about the relevant set of English and Educational Studies requirements, please refer to the Educational Studies section of the Bulletin.

Life After Swarthmore

Students graduating with a major in English literature often go on to pursue graduate or professional studies or take up a wide variety of positions in the working world where strong reading, writing, and interpretive skills are at a premium—in the public or private sector, in government or in non-government organizations. Many study law, medicine, or journalism. We number among our graduates poets and novelists, social workers and scholars, news writers, broadcast journalists and editors, grant-writers, doctors, and directors.

Curriculum

The English Department courses are grouped together by historical period, genre, or course level as follows:
001–005 A, B, C, etc.: Academic writing courses and seminars that do not count toward the major
008 and 009 A, B, C, etc.: First-Year Seminars (counted as W courses)
010–096: Advanced courses including core courses
010, 011: Survey Courses in British Literature
014–019: Medieval
020–029: Renaissance and 17th Century
030–039: Restoration, 18th Century, and Romantic
040–049: Victorian to Modern
050–069: American (including African American, Asian American, and Native American)
070 A, B, C, etc.: Creative Writing Workshops
071A, B, C, etc.: Genre Studies
072–079: Comparative Literature/Literature in Translation
080–096: Critical Theory, Film, and Media Studies
097–099: Independent Study and Culminating Exercises
Over 100: Honors Seminars, Theses, etc. (open to juniors and seniors with approval of the department chair only)

001–005: Academic Writing Courses

These courses are writing-intensive courses that count toward graduation credit but not toward the English major. They may not be substituted for a prerequisite course in English.

ENGL 001C. Writing Pedagogy

(Cross-listed as EDUC 001C)
This seminar serves as the gateway into the Writing Associates Fellowship Program. Students are introduced to the theory and pedagogy of composition studies and the concept of reflective practice. The seminar asks students to connect theory with practical experience when assessing how best to engage with different student writers and different forms of academic prose. Students will interact with the complexity of their new positions as peer mentors while learning how to be a professional within this role. Topics covered include: the ethics of peer mentoring, active listening, development of written arguments, learning styles, and conferencing. This course is open only to those selected as WAs. It is a credit/no credit course.
Meets distribution requirements but does not count toward the major.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2013 and fall 2014. Gladstein.

ENGL 001D. Writing Tutorial

Students enrolled in ENGL 001F or 001G, in consultation with the professor of these courses, may enroll in the tutorial. Students will set up an individual program to work with the professor and/or a Writing Associate on writing for the course or other courses. Students take the tutorial in conjunction with ENGL 001F or ENGL 001G, or they may take it in a subsequent semester.
0.5 credit.
Spring 2014. Staff.

ENGL 001F. First-Year Seminar: Transitions to College Writing

This class, limited to 12, introduces students to the different genres of writing required at the College. Through assignments and class readings students learn what they might need to transition from writing in high school to writing at Swarthmore.
Meets distribution requirements but does not count toward the major. Students may take ENGL 001F and an English Literature first-year seminar (ENGL 008 A-Z and 009A-Z).
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2013 and fall 2014. Staff.

ENGL 001G. Writing with Genres

Writing with Genres looks behind the scenes of typical genres assigned at Swarthmore College to help students uncover how a disciplinary community’s assumptions and practices shape what is and what isn’t acceptable for writers. To explore these writing expectations, this class is built around one sustained question that will guide reading and writing throughout the semester: how have advanced members of disciplinary communities—professors, professionals, seniors—come to know what they know about writing? To answer this question, this course aims to teach students how an understanding of genre (as an organizing principle of disciplinary ways of inventing, writing, and thinking) can not only improve academic writing, but can also make evident the tacit knowledge and skills required by a range of academic genres.
This course is open to all students and offers an opportunity to develop skills as college writers. Through frequent practice, class discussion, and in-class activities, students will become familiar with all aspects of the writing process and will develop their ability to write academically. Students will also participate in conferences with the instructor and course Writing Associates. Meets distribution requirements but does not count toward the major.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Staff.

ENGL 001H. Insights into Argument and Research Writing Across the Disciplines

This course will appeal to any student interested in learning how to use the research process to write engaging, relevant papers. The course will ask each student to use rhetorical and writing studies as a foundation for a critical investigation of writing in their discipline and address the questions: “How does an academic discipline communicate its work to different audiences?” and “What does this tell us about the nature of specific academic communication practices and cultures?” By exploring these questions, students will be introduced to paper writing through the process of crafting academic arguments from research-oriented questions derived from their own academic interests. Through in-class discussions, short writing assignments, and independent research, students will hone their writing skills and produce a variety of common texts found in academic writing communities—annotated bibliographies, literature reviews, abstracts, formal research papers, conference papers, and visual presentations. Students will conference with the instructor and course Writing Associates to discuss their drafts and revision strategies.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Staff.

ENGL 002A. Argument and Rhetoric Across the Disciplines

This course examines the questions of rhetorical analysis in different academic genres. Through the reading of academic journal articles, popular press pieces, and texts on rhetoric and argument, students will both deconstruct and construct academic arguments as they are presented in different disciplines. The course will explore such topics as ethos, pathos, and logos; intended audience and how to use evidence to persuade that audience; what constitutes evidence and how evidence is utilized; the use of numbers to support or respond to an argument.
Meets distribution requirements but does not count toward the major.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Gladstein.

ENGL 003A. Independent Study and Directed Reading in Writing Studies

Students who plan an independent study or a directed reading must consult with the appropriate instructor and submit a prospectus for such work before the beginning of the semester during which the study is actually done. The course is available only if a professor is free to supervise the project.
0.5 or 1 credit.
Staff.

ENGL 005. Journalism Workshop

An introduction to the basics of news gathering, news writing, and journalism ethics. Students learn the values, skills, and standards crucial to high-quality journalism, regardless of platform. They write conventional news stories as well as narratives, profiles, non-deadline features, trend stories, and point-of-view articles on a beat of their choosing. Guest speakers include award-winning reporters and editors. This course counts as a general humanities credit and as a writing course, but does not count as a credit toward a major or minor in English literature. Application to this course does not require the submission of a manuscript.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Mezzacappa.

008 and 009: First-Year Seminars In English Literature

These courses are limited to 12 first-year students only. No student may take more than one. All count as Writing courses.

ENGL 009B. First-Year Seminar: Old Worlds, New Worlds

This course investigates the long written history of European travel to (and conquests of) “new” worlds, Eastern and Western. Texts include the fantastical but influential Travels of Sir John Mandeville, More’s fictional Utopia, Columbus’s accounts of his explorations, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, and Milton’s Paradise Lost. Geopolitical and literary histories intersect: forms of writing govern the imagination of exploration, and vice versa. The course concludes with Robinson Crusoe and Equiano’s abolitionist autobiography.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Song.

ENGL 009C. First-Year Seminar: Imagining Natural History

For over 200 years, writers have observed, described and puzzled over Nature writ large and small. How does the human imagination continually rediscover itself in natural history? In this course, students will read and analyze classic texts in the nature writing tradition while working to develop the skills of a naturalist themselves as they keep a field journal set in the College’s Crum woods. Readings range from British and American Romantics (the Wordsworths, Clare, Keats, Emerson and Thoreau) to contemporary writers such as Michael Pollan and Barry Lopez.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Bolton.

ENGL 009D. First-Year Seminar: Nation and Migration

Drawing on novels, short stories and film produced by immigrant writers from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean, this course explores the ways in which identity and community is shaped in the modern world. How does the migrant/diasporic writer rewrite the English language to reflect questions of race and power, nationhood and citizenship, and histories of the past and present? Authors include Salman Rushdie, Edwidge Danticat, Chimananda Adichie and Mohsin Hamid.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Mani.

ENGL 009E. First-Year Seminar: Narcissus and the History of Reflection

We’ve all used the term “narcissist,” perhaps to accuse ourselves as much as others. Narcissism seems at once reprehensible and an unavoidable part of personhood. This course investigates how, for centuries, the story of Narcissus has been reworked to understand creative reflection and how we see ourselves in relation to others. At stake are questions of desire, gender, racial identities, and language. Authors include Ovid, Milton, Wilde, Freud, and Fanon; also visual art and film.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Song.

ENGL 009G. First-Year Seminar: Comedy

This course covers a range of comic dramas and comic performances. It will introduce key theories about comedy as a genre and comic performance as a cultural practice. We will also work intensively on expository writing and revision. Likely texts include films, plays by Plautus, Shakespeare, Behn, Wilde, and Churchill; and materials on minstrelsy, genre theory, gender, and performance studies.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Johnson.

ENGL 009H. First-Year Seminar: Portraits of the Artist.

We will study a variety of works portraying artists in different cultures and contexts and media. The syllabus will vary each year but may include: Scheherazade as story-teller (Arabian Nights selections), Shakespeare (sonnets), Mozart (the movie Amadeus), Puccini’s opera La Bohème, Frida Kahlo’s life and work, Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Tony awarding-winning musical In the Heights (2008), and a suitable novel, along with selected background and critical materials.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Schmidt.

ENGL 009J. First-Year Seminar: Revolution and Revolt

What makes a revolution? How is it won or lost—and who decides? This course investigates the literature of rebellion from the late 18th-century’s “Age of Revolution” to the Occupy movements. We will read the work of visionary radicals, slave insurrectionists, communists, anarchists, feminists, and more, asking how their writing both interprets the memory of previous revolutions and imagines possibilities beyond them.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2013 and fall 2014. Cohen.

ENGL 009K. First-Year Seminar: The Image of the City

Americans have imagined the modern city as an engine of capitalism and of culture, as a place of beauty and a battlefield, and as a symbol of modernity and of its decline. Drawing on fiction, poetry, photography, and film, we will consider some of the ways in which Americans have represented urban spaces and cultures, particularly in New York, Chicago, Detroit, and Philadelphia. Authors to include Wright, Baldwin, Levine, Jacobs, and Whitman.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Leary.

ENGL 009Q. First-Year Seminar: Subverting Verses

Once history, biography, fiction, philosophy, and even science could be written in verse without seeming peculiar or affected, but today the line between poetry and prose is sharply drawn. Or is it? This course will examine unconventional forms and uses of poetry—from Seneca’s Oedipus to Rita Dove’s Darker Face of the Earth, from Geoffrey Chaucer’s Tales to Vikram Seth’s Golden Gate, from Bob Perelman’s verse essays to Carolyn Forché’s prose poems—to explore our assumptions about the nature of genre.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013-2014. Anderson.

ENGL 009S. First-Year Seminar: Black Liberty, Black Literature

How have African American writers told stories of freedom, and how have they tried to tell them freely? How has the question of freedom shaped the development of, and debates over, an African American literary tradition? Drawing upon fiction, poetry, personal narratives, and critical essays, we will examine freedom as an ongoing problem of form, content, and context in black literature from antebellum slavery to the present.
Eligible for BLST credit.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2013 and fall 2014. Foy.

ENGL 009Z. First-Year Seminar: Literature Against History?

Do we need history in order to read literature, or does it simply get in our way? In this class, we will study the conflict between text and context in literary interpretation. Our syllabus will include texts like Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, Shakespeare’s sonnets, John Donne’s poetry, Erich Auerbach’s Mimesis, Roland Barthes’s Mythologies, Cleanth Brook’s The Well-Wrought Urn, Frederic Jameson’s The Political Unconscious, and Eve Sedgwick’s Touching Feeling.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Buurma.

010–099: Advanced Courses

These courses are open to freshmen and sophomores who have taken a Writing course from any department on campus and to juniors and seniors without prerequisite.

Core Courses

For fuller descriptions, see the following:
ENGL 010. Core Course: Survey I: Beowulf to Milton*
ENGL 035. Core Course: The Rise of the Novel***
ENGL 040. Core Course: Victorian Literature and the Culture of the Review
ENGL 045. Core Course: Modern British Poetry
ENGL 052A. Core Course: U.S. Fiction, 1900–1950
ENGL 052B. Core Course: U.S. Fiction, 1945 to the Present
ENGL 053. Core Course: Modern American Poetry
ENGL 054. Core Course: Faulkner, Morrison & the Representation of Race
ENGL 061. Core Course: Fictions of Black America
ENGL 071D. Core Course: The Short Story in the U.S.
ENGL 076. Core Course: The World, the Text, and the Critic


014–019: Medieval


ENGL 010. Core Course: Survey I: Beowulf to Milton*

A historical and critical survey of poetry, prose, and drama from Beowulf to Milton. This will include British literature from the following periods: Anglo-Saxon, Middle English, Renaissance, and 17th century.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Williamson.

ENGL 014. Old English/History of the Language*

(Cross-listed as LING 014)
A study of the origins and development of English—sound, syntax, and meaning—with an initial emphasis on learning Old English. Topics may include writing and speech, a history of morphology, the changing phonology from Old to Middle English, Shakespeare’s puns and wordplay, a history of sounds and spellings, modern coinages, and creoles. We range from Beowulf to Cummings, from Chaucer to Chomsky.
This course may be taken without the usual prerequisite course in English; however, it may not serve in the place of a prerequisite for other advanced courses.
Counts as humanities distribution credit under this listing.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Williamson.

ENGL 016. Chaucer*

Readings in Middle English of most of Chaucer’s poetry with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde. The course attempts to place the poetry in a variety of critical and cultural contexts which help to illuminate Chaucer’s art. Medieval cultural readings include Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, and Andreas Capellanus’ The Art of Courtly Love.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Williamson.

020–029: Renaissance and 17th Century

ENGL 020. Shakespeare*

We’ll cover many topics in this survey of Shakespeare’s plays, including kingship, comedy and tragedy, familial relationships, sexuality, race, performance, the roles of women, language, and the rewriting of history. We will frequently return to the question of theater’s place in early modern England, while also examining the place Shakespeare holds in the cultures we inhabit. The list of plays may include Taming of the Shrew, Henry V, Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, Hamlet, Othello, Lear, and The Tempest.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Johnson. Fall 2014. Song.

ENGL 023. Renaissance Sexualities*

The study of sexuality allows us to pose some of the richest historical questions we can ask about subjectivity, the natural, the public, and the private. This course will explore such questions in relation to Renaissance sexuality, examining several sexual categories—the homoerotic, chastity and friendship, marriage, adultery, and incest—in a range of literary and secondary texts.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Johnson.

ENGL 026. Allegory and Allegoresis in the English Renaissance*

Allegory is a notoriously slippery concept. It designates both a mode of writing (in which the characters and plot stand for something outside the narrative) and a way of interpreting texts (allegoresis). We can tell two stories about allegory that both seem true despite being contradictory. On the one hand, the decline of allegory as a literary form coincides with the shift from medieval to modern culture, eventually giving way to a demand for realism. On the other hand, allegory has never really left us and we may still read allegorically to some degree whether we realize it or not. This course addresses these problems by focusing on the English Renaissance as a turning point in the history of allegory. Readings include selections from The Faerie Queene, Paradise Lost, and Pilgrim’s Progress, as well as influential theoretical work by Walter Benjamin, Paul de Man, and others.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Song.

ENGL 027B. Performing Justice on the Renaissance Stage*

Courtroom spectacles—tragic injustices or the satisfying punishment of villains—have become familiar sources of entertainment. This course will examine how Shakespeare, Jonson, and their contemporaries turn repeatedly to the law for dramatic energy. Their plays compel a number of questions: what does it mean to take pleasure in injustice? What is the relationship between human and divine justice? These questions often demand historical answers, and our class will examine how dramatic works think through specific developments in legal thinking and practice.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Song.

ENGL 028. Milton*

Study of Milton’s poetry and prose with particular emphasis on Paradise Lost.
1 credit.
Spring 2014 and spring 2015. Song.

030–039: Restoration, 18th Century, and Romantic

ENGL 035. Core Course: The Rise of the Novel***

In this course we will examine the development of the novel, from its origins in a multiplicity of diverse literary genres to its Victorian incarnation as a “realist” and middle-class form through the appropriation of the novel as high art by Modernist writers and its subsequent return to multi-genre roots later in the 20th century. We will trace changes in the novel’s formal features as they relate to its treatment of themes such as publicity and privacy, the role of gender and sexuality in social life, the significance of monetary exchange, and the proper relation between the author and his or her text. First surveying the main critical narratives of the novel’s “rise” or development, we will move on to see how the material form of the novel might offer us a counter-narrative to more conventional interpretations of the genre’s origins.
Eligible for GSST credit.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Buurma.

040–049: Victorian to Modern

ENGL 040. Core Course: Victorian Literature and Victorian Informatics

This course offers an introduction to Victorian literature and culture through a focus on the review, a genre the Victorians both raised to an art form and used as a weapon in fighting the pettiest of personal battles. Often vilified as vampires who sucked their living out of other writers’ works, reviewers nonetheless occupied a central and defining role in Victorian literary culture. First locating ourselves by taking a quick look at our current 21st-century ideas about book, music, and film reviewing, we will move on to examine some of the most important—and most reviewed—works of Victorian literature, by authors such as Bronte, Eliot, Tennyson, Darwin, Mill, Barrett Browning, Pater, and Wilde.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Buurma.

ENGL 041. The Victorian Poets: Eminence and Decadence

From Tennyson’s mythic moralizing to Robert Browning’s vivid ventriloquism, from Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s sharp-eyed social commentary to Oscar Wilde’s tragic outrageousness, from the “fleshly school” of Dante Gabriel Rossetti to the provocative nonsense of Lewis Carroll, this course examines the responses of Victorian poets to the stresses peculiar to their era.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Anderson.

ENGL 046. Tolkien and Pullman and Their Literary Roots***

A study of the fantastic trilogies—Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings and Pullman’s His Dark Materials—in the context of their early English sources. For Tolkien, this will include Beowulf, Old English riddles and elegies, and Middle English, Sir Orfeo, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (many of them in Tolkien’s translations). For Pullman, this will include Biblical stories of the Creation and Fall, Milton’s Paradise Lost, and selected Blake poems. Some film versions will be included.
1 credit.
Spring 2014 and spring 2015. Williamson.

ENGL 048. Contemporary Women’s Poetry

“Merely the private lives of one-half of humanity.” Thus Carolyn Kizer defines the 20th-century revolution through which women poets give voice to the previously unspeakable and explore the political implications of the supposedly personal. This course considers a variety of poetic styles and stances employed by women writing in English today—feminist or womanist, intellectual or experiential, lesbian or straight, and mindful of ethnic heritage or embracing the new through artistic experimentation.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Anderson.

050–069: American (Including African American, Asian American, and Native American)

ENGL 051. Early American Literature *

This course examines American literature from its earliest recorded oral traditions to the Civil War. “Early American literature” is something of a paradox during a time when definitions of what constituted both "American" and "literature" were hotly debated. We will read these concepts aslant by focusing on writing about those excluded from each term—what the Trinidadian intellectual C. L. R. James, writing about Moby-Dick, called "renegades, mariners, and castaways." Our readings will include not only Herman Melville’s famous novel (now thoroughly canonized, once wholly neglected), but also less familiar texts from across a wide range of genres, including Native American origin stories, slave narratives, picaresque novels, political manifestos, and travel writing.
1 credit.
Spring 2014 and spring 2015. Cohen.

ENGL 052A. Core Course: U.S. Fiction, 1900–1950

This course focuses on well-known and newly recognized novelists important for this period. The writers considered vary from year to year but may include Baum, London, Wharton, Hemingway, Cather, Hurston, Loos, Hammett, McCullers, and Steinbeck. There will be attention to innovations in the novel as a literary form and to the ways in which writers engage with their historical context. The reading load will be heavy, averaging a novel a week. The class will be taught in a way suited to literature majors but accessible for non-majors.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Schmidt.

ENGL 052B. Core Course: U.S. Fiction, 1945 to the Present

Major authors and emerging figures, with attention to innovations in the novel as a literary form and the ways in which writers engage with their historical context, both within the U.S. and globally. The list of authors varies, but may include Eudora Welty, James Agee, Philip Roth, Gish Jen, Lorrie Moore, Sandra Cisneros, Richard Powers, Justin Torres, Gary Shteyngart. We’ll read some authors producing what is marketed as “genre” fiction, but we’ll critique that category and take their work as important contributions to the history of the novel: Patricia Highsmith, Neil Gaiman (American Gods). The reading load will be heavy, averaging a novel a week. The class will be taught in a way suited to literature majors but accessible for non-majors.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Schmidt.

ENGL 053. Core Course: Modern American Poetry

An introductory survey of the full range of 20th-century American poetry, but we will commence with Whitman and Dickinson, two key predecessors and enablers. The emphasis will be on particular poets and poems, but a recurrent theme will be poetry’s role in a democracy: is poetry really an esoteric art for the “educated” few, as some imply, or has poetry in the 20th century played a crucial role in shaping both democratic citizens and a sense of democratic culture? A new module created for ENGL 053 will focus on the songwriters of the “Great American Songbook” era from the 1920s through the 1950s—including Gershwin and Porter, plus various blues lyricists and country singers—as American poets returned to poetry’s roots in song. We’ll study a few examples of contemporary singer-songwriter-rappers too. The course will emphasize the basics of poetic form and poetic rhythms, as well as interpretative strategies relevant for understanding an author’s individual voice and the ways in which his or her poems engage with U.S. history and ideas of the poet’s vocation in society. The class will be taught in a way suited to literature majors but accessible for non-majors.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Schmidt.

ENGL 053R. Advanced Research Topics in U.S. Literature

A limited-enrollment, research-oriented colloquium for students who have done well in a previous U.S. literature course and would like to do advanced work. For the first part of the semester we will focus on readings and research materials chosen by the professor, to learn some basic methods and theory relevant for contemporary archival research using print and online resources. Later in the semester students will propose, design, and present their own research project to the class. Students will conclude the course by writing a research thesis on a topic approved by the professor; they will also write a short paper on the earlier materials.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Schmidt.

ENGL 054. Core Course: Faulkner, Morrison, and the Representation of Race

This course has two abiding aims. One is to explore in depth—and back to back—the fiction of (arguably) the two major 20th-century novelists concerned with race in America. The other is to work toward evaluative criteria that might be genuinely attentive to both the intricacies of race and the achievements of form. A particular challenge will be the following: how to focus on race (and secondarily gender) yet keep the two writers’ distinctive voices from disappearing into “white/male” and “black/female.” Faulkner readings will include some short stories as well as The Sound and the Fury, Light in August, and Absalom, Absalom!. Morrison readings will include Playing in the Dark as well as Sula, Song of Solomon, Beloved, and Home.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Weinstein.

ENGL 058. Nineteenth-Century Sensationalism

In this class we will read some of the books that thrilled and terrified 19th-century readers, including guides to urban underworlds; imperialist fantasies set in Cuba, Mexico, and the U.S. west; blood-curdling mysteries; frantic temperance novels; George Lippard’s blockbuster exposé of Philadelphia, The Quaker City; and forgotten texts that you will rediscover during your own research in local archives. How does sensationalism relate to the politics of the time, as well as to more respectable literature?
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Cohen.

ENGL 060. Early African American Print Cultures*

African American literature has traditionally been defined in terms of authorship, but how might we expand this definition to consider editing, illustration, printing, circulation, and reading? And how might this expanded definition change our understanding of the field? This course will examine a wide variety of 18th- and 19th-century African American print culture, including poetry, sermons, manifestos, newspapers, slave narratives, and novels.
1 credit.
Fall 2013 and spring 2015. Cohen.

ENGL 061. Core Course: Fictions of Black America

A survey of significant novels and short fiction produced by black writers in the past century. We will examine the textual practices, cultural discourses, and historical developments that have informed the evolution of a black literary tradition, paying close attention to the dynamic interaction between artist, culture, and community.
Eligible for BLST credit.
1 credit.
Fall 2013 and fall 2014. Foy.

ENGL 062. Black Autobiography

The personal narrative has been central African American culture, and this course introduces students to this rich tradition, emphasizing the significance of the autobiography as an act of representation, not simply a document of experience. What strategies do black narrators employ to represent themselves, and why? How do their textual strategies and contextual concerns change over time? In a society structured in dominance, how do black autobiographers engage the politics of race, class, gender, and nation?
Eligible for BLST credit.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Foy.

ENGL 064. The New Negro & the Literatures of Jim Crow, 1890-1930

What is the relationship between the birth of a "New Negro" and the birth of Jim Crow? This advanced course focuses closely on the florescence of African American literature from the late nineteenth century through the Harlem Renaissance, even as the strictures and structures of Jim Crow hardened. Authors may include, Harper, Chesnutt, Wells, Griggs, Du Bois, Hopkins, Dunbar, Toomer, and Walrond, as well as recent critics and theorists who have reconsidered the significance of this period.
Eligible for BLST credit.
1 credit.
Fall 2014

ENGL 065. Asian American Literature

How does Asian American literature function as the site of key debates about ethnic and national identity? This course explores Asian American cultural production over the past 50 years, beginning with Flower Drum Song (1961), the first Hollywood film starring an all-Asian American cast, and ending with the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jhumpa Lahiri’s short stories. We will also read a number of major Asian American novelists and literary scholars in order to explore topics such as Asian American racial formation, gendered narratives of immigration, and the changing face (and space) of Asian America.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Mani.

ENGL 068. Black Culture in a “Post-Soul” Era

Since the 1970s, younger generations of African American writers, artists, and intellectuals have struggled over the meaning of Blackness in the wake of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements that preceded them. Supported by a handful of historical and critical studies, we will examine how black novelists, playwrights, and poets in the ‘post-soul’ era have dealt with a complex of shifting and interconnected concerns, including the imperatives of racial representation in a society increasingly driven by mass consumption and global media, the contentious discourses of sexual politics, and the polarization of classes within Black America.
Eligible for BLST credit.
1 credit.
Spring 2014 and spring 2015. Foy.

070: Creative Writing Workshops

Regular creative writing workshops are limited to 12 and require the submission of writing samples in order for students to apply for them. Workshops marked with a # combine a balance of substantial literary analysis of models along with creative writing exercises geared to the models; these workshops are limited to 15 and, do not require the submission of manuscripts. Students may normally take only one workshop at a time. ENGL 070A and 070B may normally be taken only once. Creative writing courses do not count as pre– or post–1830 classes.

ENGL 070A. Poetry Workshop.

The poetry workshop—a course in which students write and talk about poetry—will emphasize the discovery and development of each individual’s distinctive poetic voice, imagistic motifs, and thematic concerns, within the context of contemporary poetics. Over the semester, students will write weekly in-class and out-of-class exercises, in addition to responses to weekly reading assignments, as they work to hone their own styles and develop their craft. Required attendance at readings by publishing authors (outside of class hours) will provide additional perspectives. Class is limited to 12 students, accepted on the basis of a writing sample (three to five pages of poetry), due during the week after fall break. The workshop will meet once a week for four hours. Admission and credit are granted at the discretion of the instructor.
Graded credit / no credit.
1 credit.
Spring semester each year.
Spring 2014. Schmidt. Spring 2015. Williamson.

ENGL 070B. Fiction Workshop

The fiction workshop will approach the challenge of constructing compelling narratives through a series of formal exercises and experiments. Students will read and comment on each other’s writing as they work to hone their own styles and clarify their thematic concerns. Over the semester, students will write weekly in-class and out-of-class exercises as well as two complete stories for group critique, one of which they will revise as a final project. Readings will average two stories per week. Required attendance at readings by publishing authors (outside of class hours) will provide additional perspectives. Class is limited to 12 students, accepted on the basis of a writing sample (maximum of 15 double-spaced pages) due during the week after fall break. Admission and credit are granted at the discretion of the instructor.
Graded credit/no credit.
1 credit.
Spring semester each year.
Spring 2014. Frost. Spring 2015. Bolton.

ENGL 070C. Advanced Poetry Workshop

Intensive volumes of poetry often represent their authors’ conscious statements, made through selection, organization, and graphic presentation. This course—in which students design and complete volumes of their own work—is normally intended as an advanced workshop for students who have taken the Poetry Workshop (ENGL 070A), or—with the instructor’s permission—students who have taken ENGL 070D, 070E, 070G, or 070J. Attendance at readings by well-known writers (outside of regular class hours) will provide additional perspectives. Admission and credit are granted at the discretion of the instructor.
Graded credit/no credit.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Staff.

ENGL 070D. Grendel’s Workshop (New Texts From Old)#

John Gardner rewrote the ancient epic Beowulf in modern idiom from the monster’s viewpoint. Tom Stoppard showed us what Rosencrantz and Guildenstern were up to offstage in Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Angela Carter’s Beauty liked the Beast better than the Prince. Students will study old texts and their modern revisions and then, using these models as starting points, reshape their own beautiful or beastly visions.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Williamson.

ENGL 070H. Advanced Fiction Writers’ Workshop

The Advanced Fiction Workshop is intended for students who have taken the introductory fiction workshop (ENGL 070B) or—with the permission of the instructor—similar fiction workshops at Penn, Bryn Mawr, or Haverford. The class will focus on further advancing your skill as writers. This will include examining ways that other writers have approached their craft—methods used to illuminate characters and narratives, as well as methods of revising and editing drafts to produce polished, finished work. Required attendance at readings by publishing writers (outside of class hours) will provide additional perspectives. Admission and credit are granted at the discretion of the instructor.
Graded credit/no credit.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Castellani.

ENGL 070J. The Poetry Project: Research and Development#

Behind the poem’s eloquence—the ease on the page that, in Yeats’ phrase, seems but “a moment’s thought”—there’s often a structure—scientific, historical, philosophical, literary—supported by focused research. This course will examine works that rely on research—works like Seamus Heaney’s bog poems, informed by PV Glob’s archaeological treatise The Bog People; or Kimiko Hahn’s “Reckless Sonnets,” incorporating research on insect reproduction; or Ruth Padel’s Darwin, a biography in verse; or M. Nourbese Phillip’s Zong!, which deconstructs the transcript of a law case involving deaths on a slave ship. Students will explore a variety of archival resources available to writers, and write poems suggested by their explorations, culminating the semester with a polished poetic sequence informed by their own research. Attendance at readings by well-known writers (outside of regular class hours) will provide additional perspectives.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Anderson.

ENGL 070K. Directed Creative-Writing Projects

Students—whether course or honors majors—who plan a directed writing project in fiction or poetry must consult with the department chair and with a member of the department’s writing faculty who might supervise the project and must submit a prospectus to the department by way of application for such work before the beginning of the semester during which the project is actually done. The number of these ventures the department can sponsor each year is limited. Deadlines for the written applications for the Directed Creative Writing Projects are the Mondays immediately following the fall and spring breaks. Normally limited to juniors and seniors who have taken an earlier workshop in the department.
For creative writing projects in the Honors Program, the 2-credit field will normally be defined as a 1-credit workshop (ENGL 070A, 070B, 070C, or 070H) paired with a 1-credit Directed Creative-Writing Project (ENGL 070K). The approximate range of pages to be sent forward to the examiners will be 20 to 30 pages of poetry or 30 to 50 pages of fiction. There will be no written examination for the creative writing project; the student’s portfolio will be sent directly to the examiner, who will then give the student an oral examination during honors week. For purposes of the transcript, the creative writing project will be assigned a grade corresponding to the degree of honors awarded it by the external examiner. Students are advised that such independent writing projects must normally be substantially completed by the end of the fall semester of the senior year as the spring semester is usually the time when the senior honors study essay must be written.
Graded credit/no credit.
1 credit.
Staff.

ENGL 070L. Creative Writing Outreach

Where do arts, education and activism meet? In this course students will explore artistic affinities through creative writing activities and consider arts education and advocacy through diverse texts. Students will cultivate skills necessary to becoming Teaching Artists in imaginative writing at the elementary level through coursework as well as through volunteer placement in local schools. Topics covered include: creative curriculum development and presentation, educational climate for grades K-5 and teaching pedagogy.
Limited to 12.
EDUC 014 is required to receive Educational Studies Department credit for this course.
1 credit
Fall 2014.

071A–Z: Genre Studies

ENGL 071B. The Lyric Poem in English***

A survey of the history of the lyric poem in English from its origins in Old and Middle English to contemporary poetry, using an anthology. There will also be special emphasis on the essentials of prosody, the study of meter and rhythm. Each version of the course will also feature the in-depth study of one poet.
Note: By arrangement with the professor, this course may be counted as either pre–1830 or post–1830, but not both.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Schmidt.

ENGL 071D. Core Course: The Short Story in the United States

Has the United States produced such brilliant work in the short-story form because it’s a highly mobile and fragmented society or because it’s highly stratified but pretends it is not? This course will introduce students to classic and contemporary short stories published in the United States in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries, from Poe and Irving to the present. We will focus on close reading techniques and the rich variety of moods and styles short stories may explore. We will read one to two stories each for most of the writers studied.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Schmidt.

ENGL 071F. Gothic Possibilities

“High Gothic” flourished in England in the 1790s; “Southern Gothic” adapted the conventions of the form to the demands of modernist fiction and the culture of the American South. Among the Gothic possibilities we will consider: sensationalism (Lewis), domestication (Radcliffe), parody (Austen), autobiography (Porter), fragmentation (Faulkner), and cultural critique (Toomer).
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Bolton.

072–079: Comparative Literature/Literature in Translation

ENGL 076. Core Course: The World, the Text, and the Critic

In his collection of essays, The World, The Text, and the Critic (1983), the literary critic Edward Said argues: “The point is that texts have ways of existing that even in their most rarefied form are always enmeshed in circumstance, time, place, and society—in short, they are in the world, and hence worldly.” This core course explores the “worldliness” of literary texts that are shaped by colonial and postcolonial histories. We will explore the relationship between reader and writer; between the writer and the text; and between ourselves as critics and the worldviews we bring to bear on so-called “non-western” literatures. The class will survey a range of 20th-century novels and essays in English, and will introduce students to a variety of critical approaches in contemporary global literatures. Authors include Zadie Smith, White Teeth; Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things; and Zakes Mda, Heart of Redness.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Mani.

ENGL 077. South Asians in Asian America

This class surveys a century of migration from the South Asian subcontinent to the United States. Making critical interventions in race and ethnic studies, the class will focus on a range of cultural texts: popular fiction, ethnography, and films. Two questions will guide our readings and discussion: how do racial minorities create and inhabit new forms of identity and citizenship? In what ways do changing discourses of multiculturalism reframe and constrain new ethnicities? Through close readings of cultural texts, we will explore how diasporic identities are shaped by gender, religion, sexuality, and class. Readings include: Lahiri, The Namesake; Prashad, Karma of Brown Folk; Shankar, Desi Land; and DasGupta, Unruly Immigrants.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Mani.

080–096: Critical Theory, Film, and Media Studies

Please see the film and media studies section for additional course listings.

ENGL 082. Transnational Feminist Theory

(Cross-listed as GSST 020)
This class introduces perspectives from domestic United States and global contexts in order to ask: How do the contributions of women of color in the United States and of feminist movements in the “Third World” radically reshape the form and content of feminist and queer politics? Through critical inquiry into major texts in transnational feminist and queer studies, the course dynamically reconceptualizes the relationship between women and nation; between gender, sexuality and globalization; and between feminist/queer theory and practice.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Mani.

ENGL 084. Theories of the Archive

Archival approaches to literature are often seen as opposite to theoretical ones. Where theory is rarified and sophisticated, the archive conjures up images of grubbing through musty stacks of paper. This course attempts to move beyond that opposition. How might doing so generate new archives, or help us think through old ones in new ways? We will read literary and theoretical accounts of archives in relation to modernity, colonialism, racialization, and sexuality; compare the collections of brick-and-mortar archives and digital ones; conduct archival research projects; and design our own archives.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Cohen.

ENGL 090. Queer Media

(Cross-listed as FMST 046)
The history of avant-garde and experimental media has been intertwined with that of gender non-conformity and sexual dissidence, and even the most mainstream media forms have been queered by subcultural reception. How do lgbt filmmakers “queer” sexual norms and standard media forms? How are sexual identities mediated by popular culture? Challenging classic Hollywood’s heterosexual presumption and mass media appropriations of lgbt culture, we will examine lgbt aesthetic strategies and modes of address in contexts such as the American and European avant-gardes, AIDS activism, and transnational and diasporan film through the lens of queer theory.
Eligible for GSST or INTP credit.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. White.

097–099: Independent Study and Culminating Exercises

ENGL 097. Independent Study and Directed Reading

Students who plan an independent study or a directed reading must consult with the appropriate instructor and submit a prospectus to the department by way of application for such work before the beginning of the semester during which the study is actually done. Deadlines for the receipt of written applications are the second Monday in November and the first Monday in April. Normally limited to juniors and seniors and available only if a professor is free to supervise the project.
Section 01 for 0.5 credit.
Section 02 for 1 credit.
Staff.

ENGL 098. Senior Thesis

Course majors in the department may pursue a thesis of their own choosing under the supervision of a member of the department. The thesis may be for 1 (40–50 pages) or 2 (80–100 pages) credits. A brief prospectus for the project must be submitted for approval by the department in April of the junior year. Before submitting this prospectus, course majors should consult with the department chair and with the department member who might supervise the project. This work must be separate from that of ENGL 099, required of every course major for graduation. Available only if a professor is available to supervise the project.
Section 01 for 1 credit.
Section 02 for 2 credits.
Staff.

ENGL 099. Senior Course Majors Colloquium***

This colloquium is open to, and required for, senior course majors in English Literature. The colloquium will focus on the senior essays required for the major, and will offer a structured experience of research, discussion, and thesis writing. Featuring a series of guest lectures by members of the English Literature Department, and critical readings on literary theory and methodology, the class offers a culminating experience for English course majors. Short writing assignments in this class will build towards the senior essay, as students work in peer-centered environments as well as in one-on-one conversations with the instructor. Students are expected to complete their senior essays by the end of the fall semester.
Note: This colloquium may count as either a pre– or a post–1830 credit, depending on the final essay topic. ENGL 099 will be offered for seniors every fall.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Mani.

Seminars

Honors seminars are open to juniors and seniors only and require approval of the department chair. Priority is given to honors majors and minors. Group I (pre-1830) seminars are indicated by an *; all others are Group II (post-1830).

ENGL 101. Shakespeare*

Study of Shakespeare as a dramatist. The emphasis is on the major plays, with a more rapid reading of much of the remainder of the canon. Students are advised to read widely among the plays before entering the seminar. Students who have taken ENGL 020 may take this seminar for 2 credits.
2 credits.
Fall 2013 and fall 2014. Johnson.
Spring 2014. Song.

ENGL 102. Chaucer and Medieval Literature*

A study of selected texts of medieval English literature with an emphasis on Chaucer. Texts will include Beowulf, and other Old English poems, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, selections from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, Margery Kempe’s autobiography, selected mystery plays and Everyman, and Arthurian materials. Most of the Chaucer selections will be read in Middle English; other texts will be read in translation. The seminar will also include some comparative texts—sources, analogues, and modern retellings of particular stories—such as John Gardner’s novel, Grendel, and versions of Troilus and Criseyde by Boccaccio and Shakespeare.
2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014. Williamson.

ENGL 110. Romanticism*

We’ll read the women poets of the period (Smith, Robinson, Baillie, Wordsworth, Hemans, and L.E.L.) alongside their more famous male contemporaries (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats) in order to explore issues of concern to both: formal innovation, colonial expansion, (counter) revolutionary politics.
Eligible for GSST credit.
2 credits.
Spring 2015. Bolton.

ENGL 111. Victorian Literature and Culture

This research-intensive seminar focuses on the Victorian novel as both a genre and a material object in its print cultural context, setting this approach within the broader world of Victorian literature and culture in order to examine the ways in which the novel was both product and producer of its historical moment. Readings will include novels by authors like George Eliot, Anthony Trollope, Elizabeth Gaskell, Wilkie Collins, George Meredith, Thomas Hardy, Bram Stoker, and Margaret Oliphant as well as readings in novel theory and cultural and literary criticism.
2 credits.
Spring 2015. Buurma.

ENGL 112. Contemporary Women’s Poetry

Women’s poetry of the 20th and 21st centuries: “Tell it slant,” Emily Dickinson advises, and women poets—whether or not they have read her work—have typically taken her subversive advice to heart. How women “slant” their truth, and how their poetic methods differ—if at all—from those of their male counterparts will form the center of this inquiry into modernist and postmodernist feminist aesthetics.
2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014. Anderson.

ENGL 114. Early American Media Culture*

The study of print culture has become a vibrant field of American literary history. But literary texts were only one product of print culture, and print culture was only one kind of early American media culture. This course borrows some of the methods of new media studies to look anew at old media—specifically, the multimedia culture of the 18th- and 19th-century United States, full of not only books but also handbills, totems, daguerreotypes, political cartoons, songbooks, and counterfeit money.
2 credits.
Spring 2015. Cohen.

ENGL 115. Modern Comparative Literature

The semester will focus on Modernism: theory and fiction. Drawing on a range of authors writing between the 1840s and the 1940s, this seminar will attend to the conceptual underpinnings of European modernism and will seek to come to terms with several of its most salient texts. Primary readings will be drawn from among the following writers: Kierkegaard, Marx, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Freud, Rilke, Kafka, Proust, Joyce, Woolf, Benjamin, and Beckett. Secondary readings will include essays by Adorno, Lukacs, Bakhtin, Deleuze, De Certeau, and others. Students should have read Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man prior to taking this seminar. Students who have taken ENGL 073 should confer with the professor before enrolling in ENGL 115; they will receive 1 credit for this seminar.
2 credits.
Spring 2014. Weinstein.

ENGL 116. American Literature

Advanced work in U.S. literary history, with special focus on the reassessment of particular authors and/or periods from 1865 to the present due to research discoveries, new critical approaches, and the advent of digital archives. For fall 2014 the authors we’ll study in some depth will include Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson; Zora Neale Hurston, Willa Cather and Ernest Hemingway. Students will have the opportunity to pursue their own research project at the end of the semester, in consultation with Professor Schmidt. Prior work in post-1830 U.S. literature and/or history is recommended. As with all English Literature Honors seminars, students must be approved by the English department chair before enrollment.
2 credits.
Fall 2014. Schmidt.

ENGL 117. Theories and Literatures of Globalization

This seminar examines the literary and cultural dimensions of globalization. Defining globalization as a social, economic and political phenomenon, the seminar foregrounds the productive intersection between literature and contemporary cultural theory. Pairing novels and short stories by major national and diasporic writers (including Salman Rushdie, J.M. Coetzee, and Orhan Pamuk) with ethnographic and historical texts (by theorists such as Homi Bhabha, Arjun Appadurai, Gayatri Spivak), we will examine the relationship between colonialism and postcolonialism; modernity and globalization; racial formation and the nation-state. By developing a critical engagement with theories of identity and difference, we will explore the ways in which global literatures engender, often in complex and difficult ways, new politics of nationalism, race, and sexuality.
2 credits.
Spring 2015. Mani.

ENGL 118. Modern Poetry

A study of the poetry and critical prose of Yeats, Eliot, Stevens, and H.D., in an effort to define their differences within the practice of “modernism” and to assess their significance for contemporary poetic practice.
2 credits.
Fall 2013. Anderson.

ENGL 119. Black Cultural Studies

How have black writers both represented and theorized a series of tensions characterizing African American culture since the end of slavery—between past and present, roots and routes, folk and modern, sound and vision, city and country, nation and diaspora, culture and capital, people and power? Motivated by such concerns, this seminar will examine approaches to African American literature that are historical, cultural, and theoretical. Prior work in African American literature and/or Black Studies is recommended.
Eligible for BLST credit.
2 credits.
Spring 2014. Foy.

ENGL 180. Thesis

A major in the Honors Program may, with department permission, elect to write a thesis as a substitute for one seminar. The student must select a topic and submit a plan for department approval no later than the end of the junior year. Normally, the student writes the thesis of 80 to 100 pages, under the direction of a member of the department. The 2-credit thesis project may take place over 1 or 2 semesters.
Section 01 for 1 credit.
Section 02 for 2 credits.
Staff.

ENGL 183. Independent Study

Students may prepare for an honors examination in a field or major figure comparable in literary significance to those offered in the regular seminars. Independent study projects must be approved by the department and supervised by a department member. Deadlines for the receipt of written applications are the second Monday in November and the first Monday in April.
2 credits.
Staff.