Engineering

ERIK CHEEVER, Professor 1
ERICH CARR EVERBACH, Professor and Chair
NELSON A. MACKEN, Professor
ARTHUR E. McGARITY, Professor
LYNNE ANN MOLTER, Professor
FARUQ M.A. SIDDIQUI, Professor
MATTHEW A. ZUCKER, Assistant Professor
MICHAEL PIOVOSO, Visiting Professor
CHEN-HUAN CHIANG, Visiting Assistant Professor
ANN RUETHER, Academic Support Coordinator
EDMOND JAOUDI, Electronics, Instrumentation, and Computer Specialist
GRANT SMITH, Mechanician
CASSY BURNETT, Administrative Coordinator

 

1 Absent on leave, fall 2014.

 

The professional practice of engineering requires creativity and confidence in applying scientific knowledge and mathematical methods to solve technical problems of ever-growing complexity. The pervasiveness of advanced technology within our economic and social infrastructures demands that engineers more fully recognize and take into account the potential economic and social consequences that may occur when significant and analytically well-defined technical issues are resolved. A responsibly educated engineer must not only be in confident command of current analytic and design techniques but also have a thorough understanding of social and economic influences and an abiding appreciation for cultural and humanistic traditions. Our program supports these needs by offering each engineering student the opportunity to acquire a broad yet individualized technical and liberal education.

The Academic Program

As stated in the introduction of this catalog, Swarthmore seeks to help its students realize their full intellectual and personal potential, combined with a deep sense of ethical and social concern.

Within this context, the Engineering Department seeks to graduate students with a broad, rigorous education, emphasizing strong analysis and synthesis skills. Our graduates will be well rounded and understand the broader impacts of engineering. They will have the skills to adapt to new technical challenges, communicate effectively, and collaborate well with others.

The Engineering Department and its students provide to the College community a unique perspective that integrates technical and nontechnical factors in the design of solutions to multifaceted problems.

Objectives

Graduates with the bachelor of science degree in engineering are prepared to:

  • Be flexible and resourceful, learn and apply new knowledge, and adapt successfully to novel circumstances and challenges.
  • Communicate and work effectively with people with a broad variety of backgrounds at both a technical and nontechnical level.
  • Apply engineering principles and methodology to the design and analysis of systems and to the solution of a wide variety of problems.
  • Consider scientific, technologic, ethical, societal, economic, political and/or environmental issues in a local or global context.

Course Major

Engineering majors must complete requirements from two categories: (1) 12 engineering credits and (2) 8 credits in math and science, normally 4 in math and 4 in science. No courses taken at Swarthmore and intended to satisfy these departmental requirements, except those taken fall semester in the first year, may be taken credit/no credit. The requirements are detailed below, with math and science discussed separately.

Math and Science Requirement

To fulfill the math and science requirement for the engineering major, students must receive at least eight credits in math and science (for this purpose science is defined as biological, chemical, and physical sciences). All of the courses used to fulfill the requirement must be acceptable for the minimal major in the offering department. The science courses must include two credits of college level physics, and one credit of either biology or chemistry. All but one of the science courses must include a substantial laboratory component. Students must have either placement or credit for: Elementary Single Variable Calculus (MATH 015); Further Topics in Single Variable Calculus or Advanced Topics in Single Variable Calculus (MATH 025 [025S] or 026); Several-Variable Calculus (MATH 033, 034, or 035); and Differential Equations (MATH 043 or 044). The minimal requirement is three credits in Mathematics, excluding Statistics. Students are recommended to take Linear Algebra (MATH 027 or 028).

Engineering Requirement

Students majoring in engineering are required to take seven engineering core courses; Mechanics (ENGR 006), Electric Circuit Analysis (ENGR 011), Linear Physical Systems Analysis (ENGR 012), Experimentation for Engineering Design (ENGR 014), Fundamentals of Digital Systems (ENGR 015), Thermofluid Mechanics (ENGR 041) and Engineering Design (ENGR 090). Mechanics is usually taken in the spring of the first year. Electric Circuit Analysis is usually taken in the fall of the sophomore year. Linear Physical Systems Analysis and Experimentation for Engineering Design are usually taken in the spring of the sophomore year. Fundamentals of Digital Systems can be taken in the fall of the sophomore, junior or senior year. Thermofluid Mechanics can be taken in the fall of the junior or senior year. Engineering Design (ENGR 090) is the culminating experience for engineering majors and must be taken by all majors in spring of senior year. Submission and oral presentation of the final project report in Engineering Design constitutes the comprehensive examination for engineering majors.

Elective Program for Course Majors

Each student devises a program of advanced work in the department in consultation with his or her adviser. These programs normally include five electives. The choice of electives is submitted for departmental approval as part of the formal application for a major in engineering during the spring semester of the sophomore year.

A student’s elective program may or may not conform to some traditional or conventional area of engineering specialization (e.g., computer, electrical, mechanical, or civil). The department therefore requires each plan of advanced work to have a coherent, well-justified program that meets the student’s stated educational objectives.

At most one Swarthmore course taught by a faculty member outside the Engineering Department can count as one of the 12 engineering credits required for the major.

Normally a maximum of 2.5 transfer credits that are preapproved by the Engineering Department will be accepted as partial fulfillment of the 12 engineering credits required for the major. Exceptions to this rule include students who transfer to Swarthmore and others with special circumstances; the amount of credit accepted in their cases will be determined on a case-by-case basis by the department chair.

Students should be aware that most lecture courses at other institutions carry only 0.75 Swarthmore credits, unless they include a full lab sequence. Students who wish to receive credit for courses taken at other institutions, including those taken abroad, as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the major should consult their academic advisers and the chair of the Engineering Department as early as possible to ensure that all requirements are met.

The courses available for traditional elective programs include the following:

  • Electrical engineering group. Electronic Circuit Applications, Physical Electronics, Electromagnetism, Communication Systems, Digital Signal Processing, VLSI Design, and Control Theory and Design. Students having an interest in digital systems might replace one or more of these courses with Principles of Computer Architecture, Mobile Robotics or Computer Vision.
  • Computer engineering group. Principles of Computer Architecture, VLSI Design, Computer Graphics, Computer Vision, Introduction to Computer Networks, Mobile Robotics, Operating Systems, and Principles of Compiler Design and Construction. Students with an interest in computer hardware may include Electronic Circuit Applications, Physical Electronics, Digital Signal Processing, and Control Theory and Design.
  • Mechanical engineering group. Mechanics of Solids, Fluid Mechanics, Heat Transfer, Thermal Energy Conversion, Solar Energy Systems, and Control Theory and Design.
  • Civil and environmental engineering group. Basic preparation includes Mechanics of Solids, Structural Analysis, Soil and Rock Mechanics, and Water Quality and Pollution Control. Additional courses include Operations Research and Environmental Systems for those interested in the environment or urban planning; or Structural Design for those interested in architecture and construction. Other recommended courses include Solar Energy Systems, and Fluid Mechanics.

Course Minor

Academic Advising

Students interested in pursuing a minor must find a faculty member within the Engineering Department to advise them. If possible, this faculty member should have interests that overlap the area of the minor. Students who encounter difficulties in identifying an adviser should seek the assistance of the chair of the Engineering Department. Students who plan to minor in engineering should regularly consult their engineering advisers. The sophomore papers of engineering minors should indicate the plan to minor and the courses chosen to fulfill the minor.

Requirements

A minimum of 5 credits in engineering is required, of which at least 2 but not more than 3 must be core courses (ENGR 006, 011, 012, 014, 015, or 041, but not ENGR 090). The remainder will be selected from elective course offerings within the department. Only those electives that count toward an engineering major can be counted toward a minor. No courses taken at Swarthmore and intended to satisfy these departmental requirements, except those taken fall semester in the first year, may be taken credit/no credit.

At most one Swarthmore course taught by a faculty member outside the Engineering Department can count as one of the 5 engineering credits required for the minor.

Supporting work in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and computer science is necessary only when designated as a prerequisite to an individual engineering course.

No directed readings may be used as one of the 5 credits for the minor.

A maximum of 1 transfer credit that is preapproved by the Engineering Department will be accepted as partial fulfillment of the minor requirements. Transfer credits will not count for one of the two courses used to fulfill the core course requirement of the minor. Students should be aware that most lecture courses at other institutions carry only 0.75 Swarthmore credits, unless they include a full lab sequence. Students who wish to receive credit for courses taken at other institutions, including those taken abroad, as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the minor should consult their academic advisers and the chair of the Engineering Department as early as possible to ensure that all requirements are met.

No culminating experience will be required. Only students pursuing the major in engineering may enroll in ENGR 090.

Areas of Study

Although packaged selections of courses will be suggested as options for those interested in an engineering minor, students may tailor their programs to meet individual needs and interests in consultation with their advisers.

Honors Major

Students with a B+ average among courses in the Division of Natural Sciences and Engineering may apply for an honors major in engineering. This B+ average must be maintained through the end of the junior year to remain in the Honors Program. A listing of preparations supported by existing engineering courses is appended. Credits from approved attachments or special topics courses may substitute for not more than 1 credit within any preparation.

Honors majors must complete the same requirements as course majors in engineering.

The honors major in engineering is a four-examination program that includes three preparations in engineering (the major) and one minor preparation. Each area comprises 2 credits of work. The preparations may include ENGR 090 and/or one other core course.

The minor preparation must comprise at least 2 credits of work approved by any department or program outside engineering.

Each major candidate must accumulate 12 credits in engineering, including ENGR 090, and the same number of science and math credits as required of course majors.

If one of the major preparations includes ENGR 090, it must be paired with an appropriately related upper-level engineering elective or a 1-credit honors thesis to be completed in the fall semester of senior year. Honors thesis credit may not substitute for any of the 12 engineering credits required for the bachelor of science. Candidates who choose an honors thesis will complete at least 13 credits in engineering and 33 across the College. The two additional major preparations must each comprise two related, upper-level engineering electives. A précis of not more than 12 pages (including tables and figures) of each candidate’s ENGR 090 project must be submitted by the end of the 10th week of the spring semester for mailing to the relevant honors examiner. The final ENGR 090 report will not be mailed to any examiner but may be brought to the oral examinations.

Senior honors study by engineering majors is not required.

Honors Minor

Senior honors study is required for all engineering honors minors, except those who are also engineering course majors. For those not majoring in engineering, the senior honors study is the culminating experience. Course majors will not take senior honors study because ENGR 090 serves as the culminating experience.

Every engineering honors minor preparation must include two related upper-level engineering electives for which all prerequisites must be satisfied. If the student is not also an engineering course major, then senior honors study is also required. Credits from official attachments or special topics courses in engineering may substitute for not more than one of the two upper-level courses within an engineering minor preparation.

Prerequisites to upper-level engineering electives may be waived by the department, depending on the student’s documentation of equivalent work in another department at the time of application.

Prospective engineering majors and minors receive more specific information about Course and Honors Programs from the department each December. Additional information is also available on the Engineering Department website.

Application Process Notes for the Major or the Minor

A form to aid in planning a proposed program of study is available on the department website. This form must be completed and submitted as part of the Sophomore Plan. All engineering courses are to be listed on this form in the appropriate semesters. Check prerequisites carefully when completing the program planning form. Courses, prerequisites and their availability are listed in the College Catalog. Note that many courses are offered yearly, others in alternate years, and some only when demand and staffing permit. An updated prospective two-year schedule is also available on the website.

Courses Readily Available to Students Not Majoring or Minoring in Engineering

Problems in Technology (003), Art and Engineering of Structures (007), and How Do Computers Work? (008) are designed for students contemplating only an introduction to engineering. Mechanics (006) is primarily for prospective majors, but other interested students, particularly those preparing for careers in architecture or biomechanics, are encouraged to enroll. Environmental Protection (004A), Operations Research (057), Solar Energy Systems (035), Water Quality and Pollution Control (063), Swarthmore and the Biosphere (004B), Environmental Systems (066), and Environmental Policy and Politics (004C) appeal to many students majoring in other departments, particularly those pursuing an environmental studies minor. Students interested in computers, including computer science majors or minors, may wish to consider Fundamentals of Digital Systems (015), Principles of Computer Architecture (025), Computer Graphics (026), Computer Vision (027), and Mobile Robotics (028). Students majoring in the physical sciences or mathematics may enroll routinely in advanced engineering courses.

Note that Engineering Methodology, Problems in Technology, Environmental Protection, Swarthmore and the Biosphere, Art and Science of Structures and How Do Computers Work? are not admissible as technical electives within an engineering major or minor but may be taken as free electives subject to the 20-course rule.

Off-Campus Study

Swarthmore's Central European Program in Krakow Poland

A program of study is available, normally in the spring of the junior year, at the Technical University of Krakow, Poland, for students interested in an engineering study abroad experience in a non-English-speaking country. Students take courses taught in English consisting of two engineering electives and a survey course Environmental Science and Policy in Central and Eastern Europe, plus an intensive orientation course on Polish language and culture provided by the Jagiellonian University. Coordinator: Professor McGarity.

Courses

ENGR 003. Problems in Technology

For students not majoring in science or engineering, this course will concentrate on the automobile and its impact on society. Class time will cover the principles of operation of vehicles and student lead discussions on related technical, political, social, and economic issues. Possible laboratory topics include evaluating alternative power systems (e.g., solar, hydrogen, and electric); investigating alternative fuels; and understanding existing automotive components. Enrollment is limited. Usually offered in alternate years.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.
004: Environmental Courses for Nonmajors
Courses numbered ENGR 004A–004Z serve all students interested in environmental science, technology, and policy. Indicated courses may be used to satisfy the writing course and natural sciences and engineering practicum requirements. Some may also meet requirements for minors in environmental studies or public policy and special majors in environmental science or environmental policy and technology. Similar courses are available through the College’s off-campus study programs in Poland and Cape Town, South Africa.
These courses may not be used to satisfy requirements for the major or minor in engineering.

ENGR 004A. Environmental Protection

This course covers fundamentals of analysis for environmental problems in the areas of water pollution, air pollution, solid and hazardous wastes, water and energy supply, and resource depletion, with an emphasis on technological solutions. Topics include scientific concepts necessary to understand local and global pollution problems, pollution control and renewable energy technologies, public policy developments related to regulation of pollutants, and methods of computer-based systems analysis for developing economically effective environmental protection policies.
Eligible for ENVS credit.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

ENGR 004B. Swarthmore and the Biosphere

An interdisciplinary seminar-style investigation of the role of Swarthmore College and its community within the biosphere, including an intensive field-based analysis of one major aspect of Swarthmore’s interaction with its environment such as food procurement, waste disposal, or energy use. Student project groups explore the selected topic from various perspectives, and the class proposes and attempts to implement solutions. Faculty from various departments provide background lectures, lead discussions of approaches outlined in the literature, and coordinate project groups. This course is cross-listed in the instructors’ departments and does not count toward distribution requirements.
1 credit.
Offered when demand and staffing permit.

ENGR 005. Engineering Methodology

A course for those interested in engineering, presenting techniques and tools that engineers use to define, analyze, solve, and report on technical problems, and an introduction to department facilities. Designed for students who are potential majors as well as those interested only in an introduction to engineering. Although ENGR 005 is not required of prospective engineering majors, it is strongly recommended. This course cannot be used to fulfill the requirements for the engineering major or minor.
0.5 credit.
Fall 2014. Molter.

ENGR 006. Mechanics

This course covers fundamental areas of statics and dynamics. Elementary concepts of deformable bodies are explored, including stress-strain relations, flexure, torsion, and internal pressure. Laboratory work includes a MATLAB workshop, experiments on deformable bodies, and a truss-bridge team design competition.
Prerequisite: MATH 015 and PHYS 3 strongly recommended.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Siddiqui, Everbach.

ENGR 007. Art and Engineering of Structures

This introduction to the basic principles of structural analysis and design includes an emphasis on the historical development of modern structural engineering. It is suitable for students planning to study architecture or architectural history, or who have an interest in structures. This course includes a laboratory and is designed for students not majoring in engineering. Usually offered in alternate years.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Siddiqui.

ENGR 008. How Do Computers Work?

This course combines technical basics of digital systems and computer organization with a less technical overview of a range of topics related to computers. Class time will include a combination of lectures, student presentations and discussions, and hands-on design. Some of the topics covered include clusters and networks such as the Internet, file sharing programs such as iTunes and YouTube, and the history and future of computers. For students not majoring in engineering, no prerequisites.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

ENGR 009. Engineering and Scientific Applications of Calculus

This half-credit course will focus on mathematical applications of single variable calculus, mainly from engineering and physics; it may also include some examples from other sciences if there is student interest. In addition, ENGR 009 will include a review of relevant pre-calculus topics. It is designed to give capable and hard-working students the best chance to excel in calculus, and is recommended for students who are interested in real-world contexts where calculus is used, including (but not limited to) potential science and engineering majors.
The course will meet twice weekly for a total of 2.5 hours, and have little outside work associated with it. Most of the time in class will be spent solving problems and doing group work.
ENGR 009 may not be used to fulfill the requirements for the engineering major or minor, and is available only to students taking MATH 015 concurrently.
0.5 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

ENGR 010. Fundamentals of Food Engineering

In this course, we will study the scientific principles that will enable students to understand why a variety of ingredients, recipes, and cooking processes function the way they do, and why they sometimes don’t work as well as expected. The course will include lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises. There are no prerequisites for this course, and it is open to all students, but it cannot be used to fulfill the requirements for a major or a minor in engineering.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Molter.

ENGR 011. Electrical Circuit Analysis

The analysis of electrical circuits is introduced, including resistors, capacitors, inductors, op-amps, and diodes. The student will learn to develop equations describing electrical networks. Techniques are taught to solve differential equations resulting from linear circuits. Solutions will be formulated both in the time domain and in the frequency domain. There is a brief introduction to digital circuits and a laboratory.
Prerequisite: MATH 025/026 or its equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Molter, Piovoso.

ENGR 012. Linear Physical Systems Analysis

Engineering phenomena that may be represented by linear, lumped-parameter models are studied. This course builds on the mathematical techniques learned in ENGR 011 and applies them to a broad range of linear systems, such as those in the mechanical, thermal, fluid, and electromechanical domains. Techniques used include Laplace Transforms, Fourier analysis, and Eigenvalue/Eigenvector methods. Both transfer function and state-space representations of systems are studied. The course includes a laboratory.
Prerequisite: ENGR 011 or the equivalent or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Cheever.

ENGR 014. Experimentation for Engineering Design

Students are introduced to measurement systems, instruments, probability, statistical analysis, measurement errors, and their use in experimental design, planning, execution, data reduction, and analysis. Techniques of hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, and single and multivariable linear and nonlinear regression are covered. This course includes a laboratory.
Prerequisite: Math 033 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. McGarity, Macken.

ENGR 015. Fundamentals of Digital Systems

The course will introduce students to digital system theory and design techniques, including Boolean algebra, binary arithmetic, digital representation of data, gates, and truth tables. Digital systems include both combinational and sequential logic—consisting of flip-flops, finite state machines, memory, and timing issues. Students will gain experience with several levels of digital systems, from simple logic circuits to a hardware description language and interface programming in C. This course includes a laboratory.
Prerequisite: At least 1 credit in engineering or computer science or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Zucker, Chiang.

ENGR 019. Numerical Methods for Engineering Applications

(Cross-listed as MATH 024)
This course is geared towards students who want to know how to transform a set of equations on a page into a working computer program. Topics will include root finding, discrete and continuous optimization, gradient descent, solution of linear systems, finite element methods, and basic methods in computational geometry. We will also discuss how real numbers are represented by computers, especially insofar as they affect precision and accuracy of calculations. Techniques will be applied in a series of projects focused on engineering applications.
Prerequisite: MATH 025/026 or its equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Zucker.

ENGR 020. Introduction to Computer Networks

This course introduces the principles and practice of computer networking. Topics include the structure and components of computer networks, packet switching, layered architectures, physical layer, window flow control, network layer, local area networks (Ethernet, Token Ring, FDDI), TCP/IP, error control, congestion control, quality of service, multicast, network security, wireless LANs and cellular wireless networks.
Prerequisite: ENGR 015 or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

ENGR 022. Operating Systems

(See CPSC 045)
Prerequisite: CPSC 035 required. One of ENGR 025 or CPSC 031 is recommended.
Lab work required.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Next offered when staffing permits.

ENGR 024. VLSI Design

This course is an introduction to the design, analysis, and modeling of digital integrated circuits, with an emphasis on hands-on chip design using CAD tools. The course will focus on CMOS technology and will cover both full custom and synthesis VLSI design. A laboratory is included.
Prerequisite(s): ENGR 015 or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

ENGR 025. Principles of Computer Architecture

(Cross-listed as CPSC 052)
This course covers the physical and logical design of a computer. Topics include current microprocessors, CPU design, RISC and CISC, pipelining, superscalar processing, caching, virtual memory, assembly and machine language, and multiprocessors. Labs cover performance analysis via simulation and microprocessor design using CAD tools.
Prerequisite: One of ENGR 015, CPSC 031, CPSC 035.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Chiang.

ENGR 026. Computer Graphics

(See CPSC 040)
Prerequisites: CPSC 035 and MATH 027 required or permission of the instructor. (MATH 027: Linear Algebra may be taken concurrently.)
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Danner.

ENGR 027. Computer Vision

(Cross-listed as CPSC 072)
Computer vision studies how computers can analyze and perceive the world using input from imaging devices. Topics include line and region extraction, stereo vision, motion analysis, color and reflection models, and object representation and recognition. The course will focus on object recognition and detection, introducing the tools of computer vision in support of building an automatic object recognition and classification system. Labs will involve implementing both off-line and real-time object recognition and classification systems.
Prerequisites: ENGR 015 or CPSC 035. MATH 027 or 028(S) is strongly recommended.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Zucker.

ENGR 028. Mobile Robotics

(Cross-listed as CPSC 082)
This course addresses the problems of controlling and motivating robots to act intelligently in dynamic, unpredictable environments. Major topics will include mechanical design, robot perception, kinematics and inverse kinematics, navigation and control, optimization and learning, and robot simulation techniques. To demonstrate these concepts, we will be looking at mobile robots, robot arms and positioning devices, and virtual agents. Labs will focus on programming robots to execute tasks and to explore and interact with their environment.
Prerequisite: ENGR 015 or CPSC 035. MATH 027 or 028(S) is strongly recommended.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
Eligible for COGS credit.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Zucker.

ENGR 035. Solar Energy Systems

Fundamental physical concepts and system design techniques of solar energy systems are covered. Topics include solar geometry, components of solar radiation, analysis of thermal and photovoltaic solar collectors, energy storage, computer simulation of system performance, computer-aided design optimization, and economic feasibility assessment. This course includes a laboratory. Offered in the fall semester of alternate years.
Prerequisites: PHYS 004, MATH 015, or the equivalent or the permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

ENGR 041. Thermofluid Mechanics

This course introduces macroscopic thermodynamics: first and second laws, properties of pure substances, and applications using system and control volume formulation. Also introduced is fluid mechanics: development of conservation theorems, hydrostatics, and the dynamics of one-dimensional fluid motion with and without friction. A laboratory and problem session is included.
Prerequisites: ENGR 006, 011, 012 and 014, or the equivalent.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Macken, Everbach.

ENGR 057. Operations Research

(Cross-listed as ECON 032)
This course introduces students to mathematical modeling and optimization to solve complex, multivariable problems such as those relating to efficient business and government operations, environmental pollution control, urban planning, and water, energy, and food resources. Introduction to the AMPL computer modeling language is included. A case study project is required for students taking the course as a natural sciences and engineering practicum (ENGR 057). The project is optional for students taking the course as ECON 032.
Prerequisite: familiarity with matrix methods, especially solution of simultaneous linear equations, i.e., elementary linear algebra; but a full course in linear algebra is not required.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. McGarity.

ENGR 058. Control Theory and Design

This introduction to the control of engineering systems includes analysis and design of linear control systems using root locus, frequency response, and state space techniques. It also provides an introduction to digital control techniques, including analysis of A/D and D/A converters, digital controllers, and numerical control algorithms. A laboratory is included.
Prerequisite: ENGR 012 or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Piovoso.

ENGR 059. Mechanics of Solids

Internal stresses and changes of form that occur when forces act on solid bodies or when internal temperature varies are covered as well as state of stress and strain, strength theories, stability, deflections, photoelasticity, and elastic and plastic theories. A laboratory is included.
Prerequisite: ENGR 006 or the equivalent.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Siddiqui.

ENGR 060. Structural Analysis

This course covers fundamental principles of structural mechanics including statically determinate analysis of frames and trusses, approximate analysis of indeterminate structures, virtual work principles, and elements of matrix methods of analysis and digital computer applications. A laboratory is included. Offered in the fall semester of alternate years.
Prerequisite: ENGR 006, or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

ENGR 061. Geotechnical Engineering: Theory and Design

Soil and rock mechanics are explored, including soil and rock formation, soil mineralogy, soil types, compaction, soil hydraulics, consolidation, stresses in soil masses, slope stability, and bearing capacity as well as their application to engineering design problems. A laboratory is included. Offered in the fall semester of alternate years.
Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in ENGR 006 or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Siddiqui.

ENGR 062. Structural Design

This course covers the behavior and design of steel and concrete structural members. Topics will include a discussion of the applicable design codes and their applications to structural design. A laboratory is included. Normally offered in the spring semester of alternate years.
Prerequisite: ENGR 006, or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

ENGR 063. Water Quality and Pollution Control

Students will study elements of water quality management and treatment of wastewaters through laboratory and field measurements of water quality indicators, analysis of wastewater treatment processes, sewage treatment plant design, computer modeling of the effects of waste discharge, stormwater, and nonpoint pollution on natural waters, and environmental impact assessment. Offered in the fall semester of alternate years.
Prerequisites: CHEM 010, MATH 025 or 026, or the equivalent or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. McGarity.

ENGR 066. Environmental Systems

Students will explore mathematical modeling and systems analysis of problems in the fields of water resources, water quality, air pollution, urban planning, and public health. Techniques of optimization including linear and integer programming are used as frameworks for modeling such problems. Dynamic systems simulation methods and a laboratory are included. Offered in the spring semester of alternate years.
Recommended: ENGR 057 or the equivalent, or the permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. McGarity.

ENGR 071. Digital Signal Processing

Students will be introduced to difference equations and discrete-time transform theory, the Z-transform and Fourier representation of sequences, and fast Fourier transform algorithms. Discrete-time transfer functions and filter design techniques are also introduced. This course introduces the architecture and programming of digital signal processors. A laboratory is included.
Prerequisites: ENGR 012 and ENGR 015 or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

ENGR 072. Electronic Circuit Applications

The student will learn the fundamentals of practical electronic circuit design and construction for purposes of instrumentation and control. This includes diode applications, op-amps for amplification and filtering of electronic signals, and power MOSFET transistors as switching devices for actuators such as motors. Mixed signal devices (A/D and D/A converters) are introduced and used throughout the course. Students learn to program microcontrollers, including on-chip peripherals and the processing of interrupts. Throughout the course, practical considerations of circuit design and construction are covered. This course includes a laboratory.
ENGR 012 is a prerequisite and ENGR 015 is a corequisite; either or both may be waived at the discretion of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

ENGR 073. Physical Electronics

Topics include the physical properties of semiconductor materials and semiconductor devices; the physics of electron/hole dynamics; band and transport theory; and electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of semiconductor crystals. Devices examined include diodes, transistors, FETs, LEDs, lasers, and pin photo-detectors. Modeling and fabrication processes are covered. A laboratory is included. Offered in the spring semester of alternate years.
Prerequisite: ENGR 011 or PHYS 008 or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

ENGR 074. Semiconductor Devices and Circuits

This course explores the operation and application of semiconductor devices, including diodes, transistors (bipolar and field effect) and other devices. This includes terminal characteristics of semiconductor devices and circuits, including small signal models of single and multi-transistor amplifiers, and transistor-level modeling of operational amplifiers. The course also examines the speed and input-output characteristics of logic devices, the design of power circuits and problems of stability and oscillation in electronic circuits.
Prerequisite: ENGR 011 or permission of the instructor.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

ENGR 075, 076. Electromagnetic Theory I and II

The static and dynamic treatment of engineering applications of Maxwell’s equations will be explored. Topics include macroscopic field treatment of interactions with dielectric, conducting, and magnetic materials; analysis of forces and energy storage as the basis of circuit theory; electromagnetic waves in free space and guidance within media; plane waves and modal propagation; and polarization, reflection, refraction, diffraction, and interference. Offered in the fall semester of alternate years.
ENGR 076 will include advanced topics in optics and microwaves, such as laser operation, resonators, Gaussian beams, interferometry, anisotropy, nonlinear optics, modulation and detection. Laboratories for both courses will be oriented toward optical applications using lasers, fiber and integrated optical devices, modulators, nonlinear materials, and solid-state detectors.

ENGR 075.

Prerequisites: ENGR 012, or PHYS 008, or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Molter.

ENGR 076.

Prerequisite: ENGR 075 or a physics equivalent.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Offered when demand and staffing permit.

ENGR 078. Communication Systems

Theory and design principles of analog and digital communication systems are explored. Topics include frequency domain analysis of signals; signal transmission and filtering; random signals and noise; AM, PM, and FM signals; sampling and pulse modulation; digital signal transmission; PCM; coding; and information theory. Applications to practical systems such as television and data communications are covered. A laboratory is included. Offered in the spring semester of alternate years.
Prerequisite: ENGR 012 or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Molter.

ENGR 081. Thermal Energy Conversion

This course covers the development and application of the principles of thermal energy analysis to energy conversion systems. The concepts of availability, ideal and real mixtures, and chemical and nuclear reactions are explored. A laboratory is included. Offered in the spring semester of alternate years.
Prerequisite: ENGR 041 or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

ENGR 083. Fluid Mechanics

Fluid mechanics is treated as a special case of continuum mechanics in the analysis of fluid flow systems. Conservation of mass, momentum, and energy are covered along with applications to the study of inviscid and viscous, incompressible, and compressible fluids. A laboratory is included. Offered in the spring semester of alternate years.
Prerequisite: ENGR 041 or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Macken.

ENGR 084. Heat Transfer

Students are introduced to the physical phenomena involved in heat transfer. Analytical techniques are presented together with empirical results to develop tools for solving problems in heat transfer by conduction, forced and free convection, and radiation. Numerical techniques are discussed for the solution of conduction problems. A laboratory is included. Offered in the fall semester of alternate years.
Prerequisite: ENGR 041 or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Macken.

ENGR 086. Dynamics of Mechanical Systems

Rigid-body kinematics and kinetics in plane and three-dimensional motion; dynamics using energy, momentum, and variational methods of analysis. Application to electrodynamic systems and transducers. Matlab is used as a modeling tool for describing the linear and nonlinear behavior of the systems considered. A laboratory is included.
Prerequisites: ENGR 006, 011, and 012; MATH 034/035 and 043/044; or permission of the instructor.
Natural sciences and engineering practicum.
1 credit.
Not offered 2014–2015.

ENGR 090. Engineering Design

Students work on a design project that is the culminating exercise for all senior engineering majors. Students investigate a problem of their choice in an area of interest to them under the guidance of a faculty member. A comprehensive written report and an oral presentation are required. This class is available only to engineering majors.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Spring 2015. Staff.

ENGR 093. Directed Reading or Project

Qualified students may do special work with theoretical, experimental, or design emphasis in an area not covered by regular courses with the permission of the department and a willing faculty supervisor.
1 credit.
Offered only with departmental approval and faculty supervision.

ENGR 096. Honors Thesis

In addition to ENGR 090, an honors major may undertake an honors thesis in the fall semester of the senior year with approval of the department and a faculty adviser. A prospectus of the thesis problem must be submitted and approved not later than the end of junior year.
1 credit.
Offered only with departmental approval and faculty supervision.

ENGR 199. Senior Honors Study

Senior honors study is available only for engineering minors and must include at least 0.5 credit as an attachment to one of the courses in the engineering preparation. This course may be taken only in the spring of the senior year.
0.5 or 1 credit.
Offered only with departmental approval and faculty supervision.

Preparation for Honors Examinations

The department will arrange honors examinations in the following areas to be prepared for by the combinations of courses indicated. Other preparations are possible by mutual agreement.

Communications and Electromagnetic Fields

Communication Systems
Electromagnetic Theory

Communications and Signal Processing

Communication Systems
Digital Signal Processing

Computer Architecture

Fundamentals of Digital Systems
Principles of Computer Architecture

Electromagnetic Theory

Electromagnetic Theory I
Electromagnetic Theory II

Electronics

Electronic Circuit Applications
Physical Electronics

Environmental Systems

Operations Research
Environmental Systems

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics

Heat Transfer
Fluid Mechanics

Integrated Electronics

Electronic Circuit Applications
VLSI Design

Mobile Robotics and Machine Vision

Computer Vision
Mobile Robotics

Signals and Systems

Control Theory and Design
Digital Signal Processing

Solar Thermal Systems

Solar Energy Systems
Thermal Energy Conversion or Heat Transfer

Structural Analysis and Design

Structural Analysis
Structural Design

Structural Mechanics

Mechanics of Solids
Structural Analysis

Structures and Soil

Structural Analysis
Geotechnical Engineering: Theory and Design

Thermal Energy Conversion and Heat Transfer

Thermal Energy Conversion
Heat Transfer

Visual Information Systems

Computer Graphics
Computer Vision

Water Quality and Fluid Mechanics

Water Quality and Pollution Control
Fluid Mechanics

Water Quality and Supply Systems

Water Quality and Pollution Control
Environmental Systems