Classics

ROSARIA V. MUNSON, Professor, Acting Chair spring 2014 1
WILLIAM N. TURPIN, Professor and Chair 2
GRACE M. LEDBETTER, Associate Professor 2
JEREMY LEFKOWITZ, Assistant Professor
SETH BERNARD, Visiting Assistant Professor
DEBORAH SLOMAN, Administrative Assistant

1 Absent on leave, fall 2013.
2 Absent on leave, spring 2014.

The field of Classics is devoted to the study of the cultures of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The curriculum includes training in the Greek and Latin languages at the Elementary, Intermediate, and Seminar levels. In addition, the department offers a range of courses on the history, literature, philosophy, religion, and cultural life of antiquity, including classes that explore the reception of the Classical past in later periods up to the present day. The rigorous training in Greek and Latin that is the hallmark of Swarthmore’s Classics program has meant that the department enjoys remarkable success in producing students who go on to become leaders in the field. But because it is a truly interdisciplinary field, Classics also appeals to students with a wide variety of interests and career goals.

The Academic Program

Greek, Latin, classical studies, and ancient history may be a major or minor subject in either the Course or the Honors Program. Three of these majors (Greek, Latin, and ancient history) require advanced work in one of the original languages, while a major or minor in classical studies and a minor in ancient history encourage but do not require language study. Acceptance into one of the majors is dependent on promising work in relevant courses (normally indicated by A’s and B’s).

Course Major

Greek: 8.5 credits required, including 0.5-credit senior course study (see below). Two credits must come from an honors seminar in Greek.
Latin: 8.5 credits required, including 0.5-credit senior course study (see below). Two credits must come from an honors seminar in Latin.
Classical Studies: 8.5 credits in Greek, Latin, classical studies or ancient history including 0.5-credit senior course study (see below). Two credits must come from a Classical Studies Capstone Seminar plus attachment. Other departments on campus offer courses focused on aspects of classical antiquity (e.g. art history, philosophy, political science), and usually these will count toward completion of the major; students are advised to consult the chair for an accurate list of such courses.
Ancient History: A major in ancient history consists of four ancient history courses (ANCH 031, 032, 042, 044, 056, or 066), four credits in Greek or Latin, two of which must be from an honors seminar, and 0.5-credit senior course study. A second seminar in Latin or Greek can be substituted for two ancient history courses.

Course Minor

Greek: 5 credits in Greek.
Latin: 5 credits in Latin.
Classical Studies: 5 credits in Greek, Latin, classical studies or ancient history
Ancient History: A course minor in ancient history will consist of four courses in ancient history, and an attachment to one of them. That attachment will be presented to members of the department for evaluation and oral examination.

Culminating Exercise/Senior Course Study

The culminating experience for course majors in Greek, Latin, classical studies, and ancient history is a 0.5-credit senior course study (GREK 098, LATN 098, CLST 098, ANCH 098). This independent study will be taken in the senior year to prepare for a graded oral exam taken in the spring with the Classics faculty. The oral exam will be based on a 2-credit seminar the student has completed. The students will submit their final exams and a paper from the seminars, which may be revised. The oral exams focus on the seminars as a whole as well as on the papers and written exams submitted. Enrollment in senior course study will not prevent enrollment in a standard 4 credit course load.

Honors Program in Classics

Greek and Latin: For a major in Greek or Latin, preparation for honors exams will normally consist of three seminars; students may take a fourth seminar in the major, but not for external examination. A student minoring in Greek or Latin will take one external examination based on one seminar. Minors are, however, strongly encouraged to take more than one seminar, in order to be adequately prepared for the examination.
Classical Studies: Honors majors will complete 8 credits in Greek, Latin, classical studies, or ancient history. They must complete three 2-credit units of study, of which at least one must be a Classical Studies Capstone Seminar (plus attachment). Minors will complete 5 credits in Greek, Latin, classical studies, or ancient history. Minors will complete 5 credits in Greek, Latin, classical studies, or ancient history including a Classical Studies Capstone Seminar plus attachment.
Ancient History: For a major in ancient history, one preparation will be a seminar in either Latin or Greek. The other two preparations can be another seminar in the same language and a course-plus-attachment, or two courses-plus-attachments. Students minoring in ancient history will take three courses in ancient history and add an attachment to one of them. That course-plus-attachment will be the preparation for the external exam. No ancient language is required for this minor.

Senior Honors Study

All honors majors and minors will select one paper from each seminar to be sent to the external examiner for that seminar. The student is free to submit the paper with minor or major revisions or no revisions at all. The department suggests a word limit of 2,000–3,000 words as an appropriate guideline (4,000 words is the senior honors limit set by the College). Majors will, therefore, submit three such papers, and minors will submit one. Senior Honors Study is not required for students whose Honors preparation is a course with an attachment. The portfolio sent to external examiners will contain the seminar papers, together with syllabi and related materials, if any, from the instructors. A combination of (three-hour) written and (one-hour) oral exams will be the mode of external assessment for seminars. For course-plus-attachment, examiners will receive the course syllabus and the written product of the attachment. The exam will be just an oral assessment.

Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate Credit

The department will grant one credit for one or more grades of 5 on the Latin AP, or the IB equivalent.

Off-Campus Study

A semester of off-campus study is usually possible for majors in classics. The department is a member of the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome, and encourages students in their junior year to participate, preferably in the fall semester. The ICCS program offers traditional courses in Greek, Latin, Italian and renaissance and baroque art history, and a required two-credit course based on first-hand exposure to the archaeological and artistic monuments of the ancient world to be found in Rome, the Bay of Naples, and Sicily.

Research and Summer Study

The department often sponsors students in independent summer research, often in cooperation with a faculty member. It regularly supports the summer study of Latin and Greek at other institutions, especially at the intermediate and introductory levels. In particular our students have had success with intensive summer courses in elementary Latin and Greek at Berkeley, CUNY, and University College, Cork, Ireland. The department has also supported students participating in archeological excavations of classical sites, including in recent years the Anglo-American Project at Pompeii and the SMU / Franklin and Marshall field school at Poggio Colla in Tuscany.

Life After Swarthmore

Many of our majors, and some minors, go on to pursue careers as professional classicists, at both the college and secondary levels. Swarthmore students well prepared in both Latin and Greek are competitive candidates for excellent graduate programs in classics, and in related fields such as medieval studies, English, history, and archaeology. In recent years Classics majors have been admitted to graduate programs at UNC-Chapel Hill, Penn, CUNY Graduate Center, Yale, Harvard, Duke, Princeton, University of Chicago, and Stanford. Others have successfully obtained teaching positions in secondary schools, both public and private; it is worth mentioning that there is a significant demand for teachers of Latin, particularly at the secondary level, and some states, including Pennsylvania, make it possible to teach Latin in public schools before obtaining professional certification. Most majors and minors have successfully pursued careers only tangentially related to classics, often after attending professional school. There are Swarthmore classicists in law, medicine, business, art, and music, and many other walks of life.

GREK 001–002. Intensive First-Year Greek

Students learn the basics of the language and are introduced to the culture and thought of the Greeks. The course provides a selection of readings from the most important Greek authors, including Herodotus, Thucydides, Sophocles, Euripides, and Plato. The course meets four times a week and carries 1.5 credits each semester. Students who start in the GREK 001–002 sequence must pass GREK 002 to receive credit for GREK 001.
Humanities. 1.5 credits.
Year-long course.
Fall 2013. Bernard, Turpin.
Spring 2014. Lefkowitz, Munson.

GREK 011. Plato and Socratic Irony

This course will focus on one or more of the Socratic dialogues of Plato in Greek. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills in reading and composing Greek, and also on the analysis of Plato’s characteristic literary techniques and philosophical thought. The course will include a systematic review of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. GREK 011 is normally taken after GREK 002.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Fall 2013. Ledbetter.

GREK 012. Homer’s Iliad

This course examines the literary, historical, and linguistic significance of Homer’s Iliad. Selections from the poem are read in Greek and the entire poem is read in translation.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Spring 2014. Munson.

GREK 091. Attachment to a Classical Studies Capstone Seminar

Students read texts in Greek that complement a Classical Studies Capstone Seminar.
Humanities. 1 credit.

GREK 093. Directed Reading

Independent work for advanced students under the supervision of an instructor. Interested students should contact the chair as soon as possible concerning possible authors and topics.
Humanities. 1 credit.

GREK 098. Senior Course Study

Independent study taken normally in the spring of senior year by course majors. Students will prepare for a graded oral exam held in the spring with department faculty. The exam will be based on any two-credit unit of study within the major (Honors seminar or course plus attachment), with students submitting their final exam and a paper, which can be revised.
0.5 credit.

LATN 001–002. Intensive First-Year Latin

Students learn the basics of the language, with readings drawn from Plautus, Cicero, Sallus, Martial, the emperor Augustus, and Catullus. The course meets four times a week and carries 1.5 credits each semester. Year-long course.
Students must pass LATN 002 to receive credit for LATN 001.
Humanities. 1.5 credits each semester.
Fall 2013. Turpin, Bernard.
Spring 2014. Lefkowitz, Munson.

LATN 013. Tradition and Transformation in the Roman Empire

Selected readings by the poet Ovid. Topics will include the range of poetic genres in which Ovid wrote, the characteristics of his writing that remain stable across these different genres, and Ovid’s relationship to the history and culture of the time in which he lived.
Prerequisite: LATN 011 or its equivalent.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

LATN 014. Medieval Latin

Readings are chosen from the principal types of medieval Latin literature, including religious and secular poetry, history and chronicles, saints’ lives, satire, philosophy, and romances.
Prerequisite: LATN 011 or its equivalent.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

LATN 017. Latin Poetry and the Modernists

This course explores Latin poems influential in the creation of the modernist verse of, in particular, Ezra Pound and T.S. Eliot. The Latin texts are read in the original, for their own sake and in their own context. But we also explore the readings given them by the modernists, in an attempt to assess the uses and importance of their common literary tradition.
Prerequisite: LATN 011 or its equivalent.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

LATN 019. Roman Imperial Literature

This course will consider selected poetry or prose from the Roman imperial period. Authors may include Vergil, Ovid, Seneca, Juvenal, Tacitus, or others. The course is appropriate for students who have done at least one college Latin course at the intermediate level and for some students who have done college-level Latin in high school. Students with no previous Latin courses at the college level should consult the department chair before enrolling.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

LATN 023. The Roman Novel

This course focuses on Petronius’ Satyricon and/or Apuleius’ Golden Ass. Besides reading extensively from the works themselves, we will consider what the genre “novel” means in Latin, what these works have to tell us about Roman society and language, and various other topics arising from the novels and from contemporary scholarship about them.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Spring 2014. Bernard.

LATN 024. Latin Poetry and the Roman Revolution

The transformation of the Roman Republic into the monarchy of Augustus and the emperors was accompanied by a similar transformation in Roman poetry. In place of the staunch independence of Lucretius and the outrageous irreverence of Catullus, the new poets Propertius, Horace, and Vergil wrote poetry that responded directly or indirectly to the new political world. This course will explore one or more of these poets in depth, both within their political context and within the broader literary tradition. Students will read modern scholarly criticism, and develop their own critical approaches to writing about Latin poetry. They will also review basic Latin morphology and syntax, and build a stronger Latin vocabulary. The course is suitable for those with 3-4 years of High School Latin, or 1-2 years of Latin in college.
Writing course.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Fall 2013. Turpin.

LATN 091. Attachment to a Classical Studies Capstone Seminar

Students read texts in Latin that complement a Classical Studies Capstone Seminar.
Humanities. 1 credit.

LATN 093. Directed Reading

Independent work for advanced students under the supervision of an instructor. Interested students should contact the chair as soon as possible concerning possible authors and topics.
Humanities. 1 credit.

LATN 098. Senior Course Study

Independent study taken normally in the spring of senior year by course majors. Students will prepare for a graded oral exam held in the spring with department faculty. The exam will be based on any two-credit unit of study within the major (Honors seminar or course plus attachment), with students submitting their final exam and a paper, which can be revised.
0.5 credit.

All of the courses in ancient history count for distribution credit in social sciences. They also count as prerequisites for advanced courses in the History Department and as part of a major in history.

ANCH 016. First-Year Seminar: Augustus and Rome

The great-nephew and adopted son of Julius Caesar rose to sole power in Rome after a series of civil wars culminating in the defeat of Antony and Cleopatra. He, along with his wife Livia, transformed Rome by creating a monarchical system that hid the real power behind the traditional institutions of the Roman republic. The process was supported and explained by a unique program of literary, artistic, and architectural revival. Ancient authors to be read (in English) may include Augustus himself, Livy, Vergil, Horace, Propertius and Ovid; we will also study the artistic and architectural projects that helped to communicate the ideologies of the new regime.
Writing course.
Social sciences. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

ANCH 023. Alexander and the Hellenistic World

The conquests of Alexander the Great (332–323 BCE) as far as Afghanistan and the Hindu Kush mark one of the great turning points of ancient history. In his wake, what it meant to be Greek was radically changed, and a new world and culture emerged. In this course, we start with the life and campaigns of the Macedonian King, before turning to the Hellenistic world of his successors, following events down to the rise of Rome. Along with the political narrative, the course will consider Hellenistic poetry and historiography, archaeology and architecture, and the documentary evidence for daily life.
Social sciences. 1 credit.
Fall 2013. Bernard.

ANCH 031. The Greeks and the Persian Empire

This course studies the political and social history of Greece from the Trojan War to the Persian Wars. We will examine the connections between Greeks and non-Greeks and their perceptions of mutual differences and similarities. Readings include Homer, Hesiod, the lyric poets (including Sappho), and Herodotus and Near Eastern documents.
Writing course.
Social sciences. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

ANCH 032. The Roman Republic

This course studies Rome from its origins to the civil wars and the establishment of the principate of Augustus (753–27 B.C.E.). Topics include the legends of Rome’s foundation and of its republican constitution; the conquest of the Mediterranean world, with special attention to the causes and pretexts for imperialism; the political system of the Late Republic, and its collapse into civil war.
Writing course.
Social sciences. 1 credit.
Spring 2014. Bernard.

ANCH 042. Democratic Athens

Using diverse primary sources (Thucydides’ Histories, tragedy, comedy, and others), this course explores several aspects of classical Athenian culture: democratic institutions and ideology, social structure, religion, intellectual trends, and the major historical events that affected all of these and shaped the Greek world in the fifth and early fourth centuries B.C.E.
Writing course.
Social sciences. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

ANCH 044. The Early Roman Empire

A detailed study of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the Roman world from the fall of the Republic through the Antonine Age (50 B.C.E.–C.E. 192). Ancient authors read include Petronius; Apuleius; Suetonius; and, above all, Tacitus.
Writing course.
Social sciences. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

ANCH 045. Cities of the Ancient Mediterranean.

Athens, Rome, Jerusalem, Alexandria, Constantinople, Venice: the cities ringing the Mediterranean Sea hold a dominant place in the historical perception and cultural imagination of the region. This course considers the role of these cities within their historical context, from around 2000 BCE to 1000 CE, considering such questions as: What characteristics distinguish the Mediterranean city? What led to the rise and decline of particular cities? What was urban life and death like? How did urban centers function within the greater networks of economic, cultural, and political interaction? We will consider both the most important literary and documentary sources, as well as the archaeological evidence offered by art, architecture and material culture more generally.
Social sciences. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

ANCH 056. Pagans and Christians in the Roman Empire

This course considers the rise of Christianity and its encounters with the religious and political institutions of the Roman Empire. It examines Christianity in the second and third centuries of the Common Era and its relationship with Judaism, Hellenistic philosophies, state cults, and mystery religions and concentrates on the various pagan responses to Christianity from conversion to persecution. Ancient texts may include Apuleius, Lucian, Marcus Aurelius, Porphyry, Justin, Origen, Lactantius, Tertullian, and the Acts of the Christian Martyrs.
No prerequisite exists, though CLAS 044 (Early Roman Empire) and RELG 004 (New Testament and Early Christianity) provide useful background.
Writing course.
Social sciences. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

ANCH 066. Rome and Late Antiquity

This course will consider the history of the Roman Empire from its near collapse in the third century C.E. through the “conversion” of Constantine and the foundation of Constantinople to the sack of Rome by Alaric the Visigoth in 410 C.E. Topics will include the social, political, and military aspects of this struggle for survival as well as the religious and cultural conflicts between pagans and the Christian church and within the Church itself. Principal authors will include Eusebius, Athanasius, Julian the Apostate, Ammianus Marcellinus, Ambrose, and Augustine.
Writing course.
Social sciences. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

ANCH 093. Directed Reading

Independent work for advanced students under the supervision of an instructor.
Social sciences. 1 credit.

ANCH 098. Senior Course Study

Independent study taken normally in the spring of senior year by course majors. Students will prepare for a graded oral exam held in the spring with department faculty. The exam will be based on any two-credit unit of study within the major (Honors seminar or course plus attachment), with students submitting their final exam and a paper, which can be revised.
0.5 credit.

Classical Studies

CLST 011. First-Year Seminar: Philadelphia: Athens of America

This first-year seminar investigates the presence of the classical past in the city of Philadelphia. In the formative years after American independence, a golden age of artistic and cultural achievement in Philadelphia earned the city its reputation as the “Athens of America.” Our focus in this course will be on the early national period (1790–1840), during which classical antiquity surfaces repeatedly as a benchmark and incitement in the social and intellectual development of Philadelphia. The uses of the classical past are not limited to unthinking or servile dependence on outdated models; rather, the Philadelphian and, more broadly, American engagement with the civilizations of Greece and Rome has more often been a complex, fraught, and often radical enterprise. We will explore the contestation of the classical past as reflected in the domains of Philadelphia-based architecture, theater, education, city planning, political debates, and the visual and decorative arts.
Writing course.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

CLST 013. First-Year Seminar: Mythology

This course examines selected myths in such major works of Greek and Latin literature as Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, Virgil’s Aeneid, and Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Specific texts and images are treated both as individual stories and in relation to other texts and images that tell the same mythological tale. Primary texts are supplemented by modern theoretical readings in gender, psychology, and literary theory.
Writing course.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

CLST 014. First-Year Seminar: Mystery Religions and the Greek Philosophers

What do ancient mystery religions teach us about spiritual transformation and contact with the divine? What were the secret rites of these religions? How do their mythological themes have universal value? Why are the language and themes of mystery traditions so central to the philosophical thought of Parmenides, Empedocles, and Plato? This seminar will study texts associated with Orphism, Pythagoreanism, the Eleusinian and Dionysian mystery cults, Isis and Osiris, and Presocratic and Platonic philosophy. Readings may include The Homeric Hymn to Demeter; Euripides’ Bacchae; fragments of Parmenides and Empedocles; the Derveni Papyrus; Plato’s Phaedo, Symposium, and Phaedrus; and Apuleius’ Golden Ass. Topics discussed will include cosmology, mystical knowledge/ascent; philosophical method; allegorical interpretation; immortality of the soul; archetypal figures of mother/daughter and rebirth.
Writing course.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

CLST 015. First-Year Seminar: Dante

With Virgil, Beatrice, and Dante-poet as guides, we shall follow the Pilgrim on a journey of despair, hope, and redemption. We shall read the Divine Comedy in its entirety, teasing out the poem’s different levels of meaning and reconstructing Dante’s world view in the context of Medieval culture: his thought on life, death, love, art, politics, history and God.
Writing course.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

CLST 017. First-Year Seminar: Archaeology of Rome

This course examines the development of Rome from a river town in central Italy to a million-person city and the capital of a Mediterranean-wide empire. We will follow this history primarily by analyzing the material culture of the ancient city and its empire. Additionally, we will study a variety of written sources that allow an unparalleled view into the society that produced this material culture. The course will conclude by examining the transformations of late antiquity and the legacy of Rome up to the present day.
Writing course.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Fall 2013. Bernard.

CLST 019. First-Year Seminar: The Birth of Comedy

Investigate the origins of comedy in antiquity through a selection of plays by the four surviving comedians (Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, Terence) along with a survey of comic theory, both ancient and modern. The history of the genre, its evolution, conditions of performance, and its cultural context will also be addressed, though the main focus will be on the nature of comedy and comic effects and on the specific workings of plays read in class together.
Writing course.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

CLST 020. Plato and His Modern Readers

(Cross-listed as PHIL 020)
Modern thinkers have ascribed to Plato some of the fundamental good and ills of modern thought. It has been claimed, for example, that Socrates and Plato distorted the entire course of Western philosophy, that Plato was the greatest political idealist, that Plato was the first totalitarian, that Plato was a feminist, and that Plato betrayed his teacher, Socrates. In this course, we will view Plato through the lens of various modern and postmodern interpretations (e.g., Nietzsche, Heidegger, Foucault, Irigaray, Rorty, Murdoch, Nussbaum, Vlastos) alongside a close analysis of ethical, metaphysical, and epistemological issues as they arise in the dialogues themselves.
Writing course.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

CLST 025. Greek Myth and Opera

Greek myths have provided the subject matter for some of the most important and pivotal works in the history of opera and ballet. Just as Greek myth informs these arts, so too, opera and ballet transform these myths and the way they are viewed by modern audiences. New and daring productions of classical operas continue to transform both Greek mythology and its operatic incarnations. George Balanchine’s Neoclassicism modernized ballet radically in the 20th century by drawing largely on Greek myth and classical aesthetic structures. In this course, we will study the relevant primary classical sources for operas and ballets such as Handel’s Xerxes, Gluck’s Orfeo ed Euridice, Berlioz’s Les Troyens, Strauss’s Electra, Stravinsky’s Oedipus Rex, Balanchine’s Apollo, Agon, and Orpheus. At the same time, we will study the operas and ballets themselves in their cultural context, and in the course of their performance history, paying special attention to recent productions.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

CLST 036. Classical Mythology

What is a myth? How is myth different from fairy tale or fable? What is its connection to ritual and religion? What sets myth apart from history? In this survey of the mythology of Greco-Roman antiquity, we will investigate the diverse meanings of ‘myth’, its social functions, its origins, its history, and its contemporary relevance. Students will get a broad overview of Classical mythology through direct and close readings of primary sources (all in English translation), including such texts as Homer’s ‘Odyssey’, plays by all three of the major Greek tragedians (Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides), and Ovid’s ‘Metamorphoses’. Our readings of ancient texts will be supplemented by study of ancient art and frequent investigations of modern responses to and theorizing of myth in diverse fields and media, including sociological, psychological, and philosophical treatises; modern poetry; visual arts; and film.
Writing course.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Fall 2013. Lefkowitz.

CLST 040. Visions of Rome

This course provides an overview of cinematic responses to the idea of Rome, ancient and modern, city and empire, place and idea, from the silent era to the present day. We will spend some time comparing films set in Rome to ancient and modern representations of the eternal city in literary and other visual media. But our primary focus will be on the ways in which cinematic visions of Rome reflect evolving cultural, political, and social conditions on both sides of the Atlantic. Specific topics to be explored include the popularity of classical themes in early silent films; Rome on screen during the rise and fall of fascism; neorealism and the shifting landscape of the city; the politics of Hollywood epics; and the dialectic between conceptions of antiquity and modernity as reflected in cinema. Screenings of films by major Italian and Anglophone filmmakers, including Pastrone, DeMille, Rossellini, Visconti, Wyler, Pasolini, Fellini, Virzì, and other major directors. Readings of texts by Petronius, Juvenal, Byron, Hawthorne, Dickens, Freud, Yourcenar, Rohmer, Calvino, and Barthes.
Writing course.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

CLST 060. Dante’s Divine Comedy

We shall study the entire work and journey with the Pilgrim through the three realms of the world beyond. Special attention will be devoted to Dante’s re-reading of previous texts, from the Latin classics to the burgeoning vernacular literatures of his own time. We shall also attempt to reconstruct Dante’s world view in the context of Medieval culture: his thoughts on life, death, love, art, politics, history, his personal story, and God.
Humanities. 1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

CLST 093. Directed Reading

Independent work for advanced students under the supervision of an instructor.
Humanities. 1 credit.

CLST 098. Senior Course Study

Independent study taken normally in the spring of senior year by course majors. Students will prepare for a graded oral exam held in the spring with department faculty. The exam will be based on any two-credit unit of study within the major (Honors seminar or course plus attachment), with students submitting their final exam and a paper, which can be revised.
0.5 credit.

Honors Seminars and Capstone Seminars

CLST 094. Ancient Drama in Performance

What does it mean to study the performance of plays that were composed and staged more than two thousand years ago? How is this approach different from simply reading the texts? Focusing on Greek and Roman tragedy, comedy, and satyr plays (all of which we will read in English translation), we will examine approaches to ancient drama that emphasize its performance, including historical and cultural conditions; the physical realities of ancient theaters; staging conventions; acting and actors; and the various ways in which Greek and Roman plays are continually rediscovered and reinvented through modern performances on stage and screen. Humanities. 1 credit.
Spring 2014. Lefkowitz.

CLST 102. Ancient Philosophy

(Cross-listed as PHIL 102)
Ancient Greek philosophy transforms traditional Greek religion through rational critique; yet, in contrast to contemporary philosophy, it continues to share many of the most prominent features of religion. This seminar will study how theology develops through the Presocratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Epicureans, and Stoics and how theology relates to the philosophers’ views on morality and the good life.
2 credits.
Fall 2013. Ledbetter.

GREK 111. Greek Philosophy and Religion

It has been said that, with the rise of Greek philosophy, change and revolution were finally seen to irrupt into the static structures of Greek religion. What exactly is the relationship between Greek philosophy and religion? Do the philosophers attempt to destroy traditional religion, or should we view them instead as transforming it? This seminar will study how thought about the divine develops in the Presocratics, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle and how the philosophers’ views more generally might be considered “religious.” Topics will include theology, cosmology, eschatology, morality, and the good life; the tradition of the holy man; and philosophical schools as religious communities.
Humanities. 2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014.

GREK 112. Greek Epic

This seminar studies either the entirety of Homer’s Odyssey in Greek or most of the Iliad.
Humanities. 2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014.

GREK 113. Greek Historians

This seminar is devoted to a study of Herodotus and Thucydides, both as examples of Greek historiography and as sources for Greek history.
Writing course.
Humanities. 2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014.

GREK 114. Greek Drama

This seminar usually focuses on one play by each of the major tragedians—Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Other plays are read in translation. The works are placed in their cultural setting and are discussed as both drama and poetry.
Humanities. 2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014.

GREK 115. Greek Lyric Poetry

This seminar will focus on the development of archaic Greek elegy (Archilochus, Tyrtaeus, Solon, Xenophanes, Semonides, Theognis) monodic lyric (Sappho, Alcaeus, Anacreaon, and Simonides) and choral lyric (Pindar and Bacchylides), paying particular attention to lyric’s dialogue with the epic tradition, the so-called rise of the individual, political and performative contexts, and modern interpretive approaches.
Humanities. 2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014.

LATN 102. The Roman Emperors

This seminar explores Latin authors of the first and second centuries, with particular attention to their responses to the social and political structures of the period. Expressed attitudes toward the emperors range from adulation to spite, but the seminar concentrates on authors who fall somewhere in between, writing skeptically or subversively. Both prose writers (e.g., Tacitus, Suetonius, and Pliny) and poets (e.g., Lucan, Seneca, and Juvenal) may be included.
Humanities. 2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014.

LATN 103. Latin Epic

This seminar usually focuses on Vergil’s Aeneid, although it may include other major Latin epics.
Humanities. 2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014.

LATN 104. Ovid’s Metamorphoses

This seminar is devoted to the Metamorphoses, which is read against the background of Ovid’s Roman and Greek literary predecessors.
Writing course.
Humanities. 2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014.

LATN 105. The Fall of the Roman Republic

This seminar examines Latin texts from the traumatic period of the Late Republic (70–40 B.C.E.). It focuses on the social and political crisis of the period as well as its connections with the artistic and philosophical achievements of the first great period of Latin literature. Authors may include Lucretius, Catullus, Caesar, Cicero, and Sallust.
Humanities. 2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014.

LATN 106. Tacitus

The seminar will read extensive excerpts from the Annals of Tacitus, usually including at least one complete book. Additional readings from the Histories and the Agricola may also be included. The principal questions addressed will include: Tacitus’ accuracy and objectivity as a historian, the importance of rhetorical techniques on Tacitus’ language and narrative, and the question of his attitude to particular emperors (Augustus, Tiberius, Claudius, Nero, Vespasian, and Domitian). Above all we will consider the question of Tacitus’ ideas about the imperial system of government: to what extent did he think Romans should resist monarchy or tyranny, and to what extent should they adjust their morality to accommodate it?
Humanities. 2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014.

LATN 107. Horace

The seminar emphasizes the Odes and Epodes and their place in the tradition of Greek and Roman lyric poetry. Attention is also given to the Satires and Epistles, including the Ars Poetica, and to their importance for the history of satire and literary criticism. An effort is made to grasp the totality of Horace’s achievement in the context of the Augustan Age.
Writing course.
Humanities. 2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014.

LATN 108. Roman Comedy

This seminar is devoted to Plautus and Terence, whose adaptations of Greek plays are among the oldest surviving works of Latin literature. The primary focus will be on close study of the language and structure of the plays, but students will also become familiar with a range of critical and theoretical approaches to comedy. Specific topics to be explored include the production and performance of ancient drama; the Roman appropriation of Greek literary genres; representations of slaves, prostitutes, and other marginal figures on the comic stage; and the influence of Roman Comedy on post-classical European drama.
Humanities. 2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014.

LATN 110. Roman Rhetoric

This seminar will focus on Roman rhetoric. We will read speeches delivered in the Roman Senate, before the popular assembly, or before juries. The principal author will be Cicero, but we will also read discussions of rhetorical theory and practice, both ancient and modern. In addition, students will have the opportunity to explore a number of topics related to ancient oratory and rhetoric, including (among others) public performance; theories of persuasion; the relationship between rhetoric and Roman law; Roman (and Greek) education practices; and the enduring influence of ancient rhetoric and oratory in the contemporary world.
Humanities. 2 credits.
Fall 2013. Lefkowitz.