Art

SYDNEY L. CARPENTER, Professor of Studio Art
MICHAEL W. COTHREN, Professor of Art History 3
RANDALL L. EXON, Professor of Studio Art 6
CONSTANCE CAIN HUNGERFORD, Professor of Art History
BRIAN A. MEUNIER, Professor of Studio Art and Studio Art Coordinator
PATRICIA L. REILLY, Associate Professor of Art History and Associate Provost
TOMOKO SAKOMURA, Associate Professor of Art History and Chair
LOGAN GRIDER, Assistant Professor of Studio Art
THOMAS J. MORTON, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History
JAKE BECKMAN, Visiting Assistant Professor of Studio Art (part time) 5
MARY PHELAN, Visiting Assistant Professor of Studio Art (part time) 6
RON TARVER, Visiting Assistant Professor of Studio Art (part time)
ANDREA PACKARD, List Gallery Director
STACY BOMENTO, Visual Resources Curator
DOUG HERREN, Studio Technician
JUNE V. CIANFRANA, Administrative Assistant

3 Absent on leave, 2013–2014.
5 Fall 2013.
6 Spring 2014.

The Academic Program

The Art and Art History Department offers two majors: art history and art. The art history major consists of eight credits in art history and one credit in studio art. The art major consists of four credits in art history and seven credits in studio art.

 

Course Major

Art History

Art history majors, course and honors, are required to take nine credits to fulfill major requirements. Nine credits must include one 2-credit seminar and the following:

  • ARTH 002 The Western Tradition (students are encouraged to take this early in their major program)
  • One course or seminar on art in the western tradition post-1800
  • One course or seminar on art outside the western tradition
  • ARTH 095 Cracking Visual Codes (strongly recommended in the junior year)
  • One credit in studio art

The remaining four credits will consist of other 1-credit art history courses and/or 2-credit art history seminars. For those majors considering graduate study in art history, it is strongly advisable to choose a series of courses that will provide geographical and historical breadth.
The Comprehensive Requirement
During the senior year, course majors will complete a comprehensive project.

Studio Art

All art majors, in both Course and Honors Programs, are required to take 11 courses to fulfill major requirements:

  • Seven credits of studio art:

STUA 001 Foundation Drawing, (or, STUA 001B First-Year Seminar)
Studio art course in a 2-D medium
Studio art course in a 3-D medium
One studio art elective
Junior Workshop (spring semester of junior year)
STUA 030 Senior Workshop 1
STUA 040 Senior Workshop 11

  • Four credits of art history, which must include ARTH 002 The Western Tradition.
  • Studio art majors can complete an art history minor as well with the completion of three art history credits in addition to those required by their studio art major.

Notes:

  • Five credits in studio art, including the distribution in 2-D, 3-D, and Junior Workshop must be completed before entry to STUA 030 Senior Workshop 1.

The 2-D, 3-D, and advanced credit requirements must be taken at Swarthmore.

  • Students are encouraged to consult with professors and advisers about art history selections relevant to their interests.
  • The senior art major is required to mount a one-person exhibition in the College gallery representing a culmination in their studio work. This exhibition and accompanying artist statement, of no less than 2500 words, is the comprehensive examination for the art major.
  • Senior exhibitions are scheduled during the last few weeks of the spring semester each year.
  • There is no course minor in studio art.

Course Minor

Art History Minor

The course minor in art history will consist of five credits in art history; four of the five credits must be taken at Swarthmore. Studio art majors can complete an art history minor with the completion of four art history credits in addition to those required by their studio art major.

Honors

Honors in Art History

Requirements for admission to the Honors Program do not differ from those for admission to the course major. Once admitted to the honors major, students will be expected to maintain an average of B+ or better in all courses in art history.

Major

  • An honors major in art history requires three two-credit preparations, consisting of three 2-credit seminars. The normal prerequisite for any art history seminar is 2 credits of previous art history course work. Each seminar will be examined in a three-hour written examination and an individual 30-minute oral examination.
  • An honors major in art history must fulfill the requirements for a 9-credit course major.

Minor

An honors minor in art history will take one two-credit seminar, and must have taken at least two other courses in art history. Only one of those credits can be a transfer credit.

Honors in Studio Art

Requirements for admission to the Honors Program do not differ from those for admission to the course major. Students will be expected to maintain an average of B+ or better in all courses in studio art.

Major

  • An honors major in art will present 2 preparations in studio art and 1 preparation in art history.
  • Each of the two studio preparations will consist of two paired studio courses. The examiner of each preparation will receive the syllabus for both courses and slides representing the body of work produced in them and will examine the student in an individual oral examination of 30 minutes.
    • One preparation pair will consist of STUA 030 Senior Workshop 1 and STUA 040 Senior Workshop 11.
    • The second pair might consist of an intermediate and an advanced course in a specific medium, or two courses with a different approach to the same medium, (ex: Pottery and Ceramic Sculpture, Drawing and Life Drawing), or, two related courses, (ex: Ceramic Sculpture and Sculpture, Drawing and Photography, Drawing and Works on Paper, Drawing and Painting)

All preparations for honors must be approved in advance by the department.
Notes:

  • Studio courses taken at an institution outside of Swarthmore cannot count towards an honors studio preparation.
  • Only courses taught by regularly teaching faculty in studio art can be applied toward a preparation. Courses taught by regularly returning adjuncts might be applied pending department approval.
  • Honors preparations approved in the sophomore year must be adhered to. Changes to the academic program, as they relate to honors preparations, must be approved by the department.
  • The preparation in art history will consist of
    one 2-credit seminar.
    • The prerequisite for any art history seminar is two previous credits in art history, including ARTH 002.
    • All majors in art, whether course or honors, must do 4 credits of art history work. Studio faculty may recommend particular art history courses as most relevant to a student’s studio interests.
  • Honors candidates in art must fulfill the course major requirements. The prerequisite for all studio work, unless waived, is STUA 001. The distribution requirements for 2-D and 3-D for the honors major in studio art are the same as those in course.
  • Honors study in studio art is comprised of a culminating exhibition of the student’s studio work, with an accompanying artist essay of 3,750 to 5,000 words. Some of this work may figure in the selections of work presented for one or both of the course pairs described above, but the rationale for inclusion in the exhibition will differ. The artist essay will be sent to both examiners of studio preparations. A revision of a paper written previously for the art history preparation, will be sent to the art history examiner.
    • The senior honors study essay will differ from the artist essay written by course students in that it will integrate the preparations in studio and art history.
    • For honors majors, STUA 040 will count outside the major for purposes of calculating the 20-course rule, since it serves as senior honors study. It will be listed on the transcript not as STUA 040 but as Senior Honors Study.
    • If a student drops out of Honors after the drop/add period in the last semester, the Senior Honors Study credit will receive a grade of NC. Senior Workshop 11 (STUA 040), assuming it had been successfully completed in the spring, will then be listed on the transcript with the appropriate grade.
    • Warning: if a student drops out of honors, Senior Workshop 11 no longer counts as outside the major, but as within. A student who has taken 12 other credits within the department, and who is graduating with the minimum of 32 credits will then have 13 in the major and only 19 outside. Honors studio art majors should be especially careful to take enough credits outside the department if they contemplate withdrawing from honors.

Minor

  • An honors minor in studio art will present to the honors examiners one studio preparation consisting of STUA 030 Senior Workshop 1 and STUA 040 Senior Workshop 11.
  • An art minor in studio art must meet the same course requirements as the course major in studio art (see above).
  • During the spring semester of the senior year a minor will write a 2,500 word artist essay to be sent to the examiner, along with the relevant syllabi and slides for the two-credit preparation.

Major Application Process

Requirements for admission to the majors:

Art History

  • Overall average of C or better in all courses taken during the two semesters preceding the time of application.
  • Completion of at least two courses in art history at Swarthmore with grades of B or better. For a double major the grade minimum is also B.

Studio Art

  • Overall average of C or better in all courses taken during the two semesters preceding the time of application. For a double major the overall average must be B.
  • Completion of at least one course in art history and one course in studio art at Swarthmore with grades of B or better.
  • A student may be asked to present a portfolio as evidence of ability to see, describe, and analyze visual phenomena critically.

Art Department Majors and the 20-Course Rule

It is a college requirement that 20 of the 32 credits required for graduation must be outside the major. This means that one can take no more than 12 courses in the major, unless one graduates with more than 32 credits, in which case the surplus can also be in the major.
For art history majors, the one required credit of studio art course work counts toward the major, but additional credits of studio art count as outside credits. Thus, an art history major graduating with 32 credits could take no more than three additional art history credits beyond the eight art history credits that are required for the major. But, an art history major could take as many more studio credits as desired.
For art majors, the required four credits in art history count within the major, but additional credits in art history count outside the major.

Advanced Placement Credit

Credit for an AP 5 will be given upon completion of an art history course in the department.

Transfer Credit

A maximum of two transfer credits will count toward the major, either from study abroad or other U.S. institutions. Students transferring from another institution should consult with the chair regarding their specific situation.

Off-Campus Study

The Art and Art History Department strongly encourages those with an interest in art and its history to consider incorporating study abroad—either during a summer or a regular academic term—into their Swarthmore program. Important examples of art and architecture are scattered throughout the world, and the encounter with works still imbedded in their original context is vital to an understanding of their historical and contemporary significance. Past experience has shown, however, that art courses in most study abroad programs fall considerably below the academic standards of comparable courses at Swarthmore. Students who are interested in bettering their chances of gaining a full Swarthmore credit for a course taken abroad are advised to meet with either the Studio Art Coordinator and/or the Art History Coordinator, before leaving the campus.

Art History

ARTH 001C. First-Year Seminar: Making Art History

Are works of art direct extensions, pure reflections, or unique expressions of an individual artist’s genius, fragile by implication and susceptible to destruction from overanalysis? Or are works of art (as well as the definition just offered) cultural artifacts produced under specific material and social conditions, and fully meaningful only under extended analysis? Must we choose? And are these questions themselves, and the talk they generate or suppress, yet another manifestation of the Western European and American commodification of art, its production, and its consumption? Such questions will underlie this introduction to the goals, methods, and history of art history. Focusing on works drawn from a variety of cultures and epochs, as well as on the art historical and critical attention those works have attracted, students will learn to describe, analyze, and interpret both images and their interpretations and to convey their own assessments in lucid writing and speaking.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Cothren.

ARTH 001D. First-Year Seminar: Architecture of Philadelphia

Virtually no other city in the Western hemisphere provides a richer cross-section of architecture over the past 350 years than Philadelphia. The city’s material culture tells the story not just of this region but of our nation, from William Penn’s utopian New World, to America’s 19th-century economic and artistic flowering, to Philadelphia’s importance as a mid-20th-century crucible of city planning and post-modern design. We will explore the built environment on foot as well as through photography, literature, journalism, and film.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

ARTH 001E. First-Year Seminar: Michelangelo and Renaissance Culture

In this discussion-based first-year seminar, we will study the sculptures, paintings, architecture, poetry, drawings, and biographies of the Renaissance artist Michelangelo. We will investigate these in light of Michelangelo’s patrons, audiences, and the larger cultural, political, and religious contexts in which these works were produced. We will also consider the ways in which these works have been analyzed over the centuries and how the biographies and myths of Michelangelo have been created and understood. In doing so, we will develop a critical understanding of the methods and terminology of the discipline of art history itself. Course projects include convening as a mock group of museum trustees to discuss whether the museum should purchase a sculpture that has recently been attributed to Michelangelo.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Reilly.

ARTH 001F. First-Year Seminar: Picasso

How should we understand the art of one of the most significant artists of the 20th century? Although long embraced by the history of art, Picasso’s art still remains a challenge to its interpreters. This course looks at the sets of questions developed within the discipline of art history to understand this protean artist. Strategies addressed include formal analysis, biography, iconography, semiotics, social history, feminist critique, ethnography, and the history of exhibition and display. Emphasis will be placed on developing critical skills in oral and written formats.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Hungerford.

ARTH 001L. First-Year Seminar: From Handscrolls to Comic Books: Pictorial Narratives in Japan

Through examination of select pictorial narratives produced in Japan between the 12th century and the present, this first-year seminar introduces students to the basics of art historical research and analysis. We will look at the ways in which handscrolls, folding screens, and (comic) books employ image and text in addressing subjects such as romances, miracles, battles, and fantasies, and consider the roles and functions performed by pictorial narratives in society.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Sakomura.

ARTH 001M. First-Year Seminar: Leonardo: Artist, Engineer, Architect, and Anatomist

Leonardo da Vinci was a great anatomist, engineer, architect and inventor whose drawings circulated around the courts of Europe. In this discussion–based course we will study the inventions, writings, paintings, drawings and biographies of this important Renaissance artist. We will consider the ways in which the works, biographies, and myths of Leonardo have been analyzed (and created) over the centuries. In doing so, we will develop a critical understanding of the methods and terminology of the discipline of art history itself.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Reilly.

ARTH 002. The Western Tradition

This course provides an introduction to Mediterranean and European art from prehistoric cave painting to the 18th century. We will consider a variety of media—from painting, sculpture, and architecture to ceramics, mosaic, metalwork, prints, and earthworks. The goal of this course is to provide a chronology of the major works in the Western tradition and to provide the vocabulary and methodologies necessary to analyze these works of art closely in light of the material, historical, religious, social, and cultural circumstances in which they were produced and received. We will give attention to the use and status of materials; the representation of social relations, gender, religion, and politics; the context in which works of art were used and displayed; and the critical response these works elicited.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Reilly.

ARTH 005. Modern Art in Europe and the United States

This course surveys Western European and American art from the late 18th century to the 1960s. It introduces significant artists and art movements in their social and political contexts and also focuses attention on art historical approaches that have been developed to interpret this art, including socio-economic and feminist perspectives.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Hungerford.

ARTH 012. The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright’s career straddled two centuries and changed the course of architecture. We will examine his buildings and writings, from the time of his association with Louis Sullivan to the design of the Guggenheim museum and consider Wright’s work in relation to the diverse currents of international modernism. Special attention will also be given to his houses and his influence on modern American domestic life.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Morton.

ARTH 013. Greek Art

This exploration of ancient Greek art and architecture will consider issues such as mythology in daily ritual; the religious, social, and political functions of sculpture; the use of architecture as propaganda; and the invention of the ideal warrior, athlete, and maiden.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Reilly.

ARTH 014. Early Medieval Art and Architecture

In this introduction to European art and architecture from late antiquity to the 12th century, special attention will be given to the “Romanization” of Christian art under Constantine, the Celtic Christian heritage of the British Isles and its culmination in the Book of Kells, Justinianic Constantinople and Ravenna, the Carolingian Renaissance, Romanesque sculpture as ecclesiastical propaganda, and the efflorescence of monastic art under the Cluniacs and Cistercians.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Cothren.

ARTH 016. Italian Renaissance Art

This course will provide a rich introduction to the art and architecture produced in Florence, Rome, Venice, Siena, Padua, Mantua, and other important cultural centers in Italy from the late 14th to the 16th century. In addition to learning about painting, sculpture, drawings, prints, and architecture, we will also study stage design, temporary festival decorations, banners and costumes. A full range of issues related to the production and reception of artworks will be addressed, including the representation of the individual, the state, and religion. We will also examine art and anatomy, art and gender, the critical responses these works elicited, and the theories of art developed by artists and non-artists alike. Eligible for Classical Studies (CLST) credit.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Reilly.

ARTH 019. Contemporary Art

This course takes a focused look at European and American art from 1945 to the present, a period during which most conventional meanings and methods of art were challenged or rejected. Beginning with the brushstrokes of abstract expressionism and continuing through to the bitmaps of today’s digital art, we consider the changing status of artists, artworks, and institutions. Emphasis will be placed on critical understanding of the theoretical and historical foundations for these shifts.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Hungerford.

ARTH 025. Colloquium: Native American Art

An exploration of the arts of native peoples across the North American continent from the archaeological records of prehistory to the contemporary creations of painters and sculptors working within a global “art world.” Attention will be given to the theoretical, political, and methodological challenges inherent in the study of these indigenous arts and their interactions with other cultures and cultural viewpoints, past and present. Discussions will focus on issues of identity and ritual, artists and their audiences, archaeology and recovery, colonization and tourism.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Cothren.

ARTH 032. Crafting Nature: The Arts of Japanese Tea Culture

This course explores the rich cultural practice of chanoyu, the “Japanese tea ceremony,” which emerged around the preparation of powdered green tea. We will examine the ritual, aesthetic, and institutional history of this practice from the 12th century to the present and consider the various cultural forms—painting, calligraphy, ceramics, architecture, garden design, religious ritual, performance, food preparation, and flower arrangement—that were integrated into and developed through chanoyu. Discussions will include the place of Zen Buddhism in the history of chanoyu, the role of chanoyu in Japanese aesthetic discourse and art collecting practices, and the impact of chanoyu on contemporary productions of architecture, lacquerware, metalware, and ceramics. We will learn the formal procedures of preparing tea (temae) and visit Shofuso, the Japanese House and Garden in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia.
Writing course.
Eligible for ASIA credit.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Sakomura.

ARTH 033. Famous Places and Sacred Sites: The Art of Landscape in East Asia

This course surveys the major traditions of landscape art in East Asia. We will explore the ways in which places and spaces are transformed into famous places and sacred sites and consider the critical role played by visual representation in this process. Major topics include the relationship between landscape and power, cultural memory, literature, mythology, seasonality, travel, and literati culture. We will examine the functions of landscape art in various cultural, geographical, and temporal contexts of East Asia and consider the complex processes of cultural dissemination and adaptation by looking at the reception of Chinese landscape painting tradition in Korea and Japan.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Sakomura.

ARTH 034. Colloquium: East Asian Calligraphy

What’s in a script? This colloquium examines the major calligraphic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan from 1200 B.C.E. to the present. We will study the functions and contexts of calligraphic inscriptions among a rich range of material texts, such as animal bones, bronze vessels, stone stelae, mountain cliffs, and various paper-based formats. In addition to analyzing the development and circulation of calligraphic styles within East Asia and celebrated works of individual calligraphers, we will explore how calligraphy conveys meaning and how it has been used as a powerful tool for cultural and political commentary.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Sakomura.

ARTH 035. Pictured Environments: Japanese Landscapes and Cityscapes

Through select case studies from the 11th century to the present, this course examines how Japanese landscapes and cityscapes have been (re)constructed and (re)imagined in the pictorial field. We will explore the complex relations between place and representation and the role of artifacts in the production and preservation of cultural memory. Case studies will offer comparative insights into the ways forms and modes of presentation critically inform the efficacy of a given artifact within the contexts in which it was made and deployed. As part of the fall 2013 BM360˚ course cluster “Perspectives on Sustainability: Disasters and Rebuilding in Japan,” this course will also explore visual responses to the 3.11.11 disaster that struck Northeastern Japan with a special emphasis on dialogues between the past and the present. The final project for the 360˚ course cluster will involve an exhibition featuring works in the Trico special collections and archives.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Sakomura.

ARTH 039. Contemporary Japanese Visual Culture

This course aims to familiarize students with the visual culture of contemporary Japan and its complex relationship to the traditional arts of Japan as well as to Western culture. Topics examined will include representations of gender, nature, tradition, history, nation, city and suburbia, tourism, food, commodity, and fashion. We will closely analyze and critique works in the print medium such as advertisements, graphic design, photography, magazines, and manga. We will also discuss examples and trends in Japanese product design and character design that have achieved global recognition, such as MUJI and Hello Kitty.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Sakomura.

ARTH 045. Gothic

This course will examine the formation of “The Gothic” around 1140 and its development and codification in the Ile-de-France to the middle of the 13th century; monasteries, cathedrals, and chapels; neo-platonism and the new aesthetic; “court-style” and political ideology; structural technology and stylistic change; patronage and production; contextualizing liturgy and visualizing dogma.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Cothren.

ARTH 065. Modern Architecture

This course traces the development of modern architecture and the built environment from the Industrial Revolution in Europe to the global present with an emphasis on the critical debates that informed its production, practice and reception. We will study architecture as a social process and formal practice through a variety of methodologies. Important themes include, technology and materials, form and function, the identity of the architect, public and private space, housing and domesticity, monuments and informality, colonization and globalization.
Field visits will be an important element to the class.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

ARTH 067. Colloquium: American Art and the Armory Show

2013 marks the 100th anniversary of the Armory Show, the controversial exhibition that brought European avant-garde art—Brancusi, Duchamp, Kandinsky, Matisse, Picasso, Van Gogh—to a broad American public. This course will review the history of American art in previous centuries in terms of themes such as portraiture, landscape, and genre painting, and then focus on American encounters with European modernism, first through the artists in the circle of photographer Alfred Stieglitz (e.g., Marsden Hartley, Georgia O’Keeffe), then the organizers of the Armory Show and the art they brought from Europe. Class meetings will entail a combination of background lectures, discussion of assigned readings, and presentations on student research projects. The course will benefit from the exceptional resources of the Philadelphia area, including the Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Barnes Foundation, and the Cone Collection at the Baltimore Museum.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Hungerford.

ARTH 072. Global History of Architecture, part I

This course will provide an intensive introduction to the history of architecture, and its chronological and cultural spans are immense. We commence ca. 10,000 B.C.E. and end around 1250 C.E. and examine select works of architecture from diverse cultures around the world. In this course architecture is seen as a cultural product that can only be understood in relation to the societal complexities within which the architecture was produced, used, and received. Certain themes—such as cultural interaction and exchange, transmission of architectural knowledge, architectural patronage, the conception of space, and the role of technology and materials—will be addressed throughout the course.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Morton.

ARTH 074. Studies in the History of Photography

This course will consider the theoretical implications of the invention of photography by taking a focused look at select moments in the history of this medium. What is meant by “the photographic?” And how have practitioners of photography asserted and/or challenged such a concept? Essays by Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, Rosalind Krauss, Martha Rosler, and others will form a foundation for discussions about specific artists, movements, and techniques. The class is organized around group discussions and is driven by student contributions.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Hungerford.

ARTH 095. Cracking Visual Codes

How do we understand the visual? What ways of seeing do we engage in and what kinds of questions do we ask when analyzing paintings, buildings, sculptures, ceramics, photographs, or prints? How do we crack the visual codes specific to images, objects, and structures of a given time and place? This colloquium will explore various approaches to the interpretation of the visual arts through the critical reading of important texts of the discipline and writings that propose or challenge a variety of analytic strategies. Students will directly engage in the interpretive process by researching, writing, and presenting on a work of art or architecture in the Philadelphia area, an exercise that will assist the exploration of questions central to their own interest in the study of visual culture. Through this course students will acquire the skills for interpreting images we encounter every day—such as advertisements, logos, icons, and other forms of visual culture.
Writing course.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Sakomura.

ARTH 096. Directed Reading

1 credit.
Staff.

ARTH 180. Thesis

A 2-credit thesis normally carried out in the fall of the senior year. The topic must be submitted and approved by the instructor in charge before the end of the junior year.
2 credits.
Staff.

Seminars

Unless otherwise noted, the prerequisite for all seminars is two courses in art history.

ARTH 136. Word and Image in Japanese Art

This seminar explores the dialogue between text and image as manifested in visual representations of courtly culture in Japan from the 10th to the 18th century. Through select works of courtly narrative and poetry, such as the 11th-century classic The Tale of Genji, we will examine the complex and nuanced interactions of text, image, calligraphy, object, function, patronage, production, and consumption as shaped by the materiality of a range of media including handscrolls, folding screens, poem sheets, illustrated and printed books, lacquerware, textiles, and fans.
2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014. Sakomura.

ARTH 147. Visual Narrative in Medieval Art

This seminar examines how and why tendentious stories are told in pictures during the European Middle Ages and the various ways art historians have sought to interpret their design and function. After introductory discussions on narratology, the class focuses on an intensive study of a few important and complex works of art that differ in date of production, geographic location, viewing context, artistic tradition, and medium. In past years, these have included the Bayeux Embroidery of ca. 1070, the stained-glass windows of the Parisian Sainte-Chapelle of ca. 1245, and Giotto’s frescos in the Arena Chapel in Padua of 1303–1305.
2 credits.
Not offered 2013–2014. Cothren.

ARTH 151. Renaissance Rome

From the 14th to the 17th century, Rome was transformed from a “dilapidated and deserted” medieval town to a center of spiritual and worldly power. This seminar will consider the defining role that images played in that transformation. In addition to studying the painting, sculpture and architecture of artists such as Fra Angelico, Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo, we will study the creation and use of objects such as banners, furniture, and temporary festival decorations. Topics will include papal reconstruction of the urban landscape; the rebirth of classical culture, art and the liturgy, private devotion and public ritual, and the construction of the artist as genius. Eligible for Classical Studies (CLST) credit.
2 credits.
Spring 2014. Reilly.

ARTH 164. Modernism in Paris and New York

This seminar focuses on “Modernism” in 19th- and 20th-century art, addressing selected artists from Courbet and Manet through Degas, Gauguin, Cézanne, Picasso, Pollock, and Rothko. Artists and readings are also chosen to illuminate current scholarly approaches to “Modernism,” including socio-economic, feminist, and post-colonialist perspectives.
2 credits.
Pre-requisite: 2 courses in art history or permission of instructor.
Fall 2013. Hungerford.

Studio Arts

STUA 001. Foundation Drawing

This course is designed as an introduction to drawing as the basis for visual thinking and perception. The class will focus on concepts and practices surrounding the use of drawing as a visual language rather than as a preliminary or planning process. Whether students are interested in photography, painting, pottery, sculpture, installation or performance, the ability to design and compose visually is fundamental to their development. The course follows a sequence of studies that introduces students to basic drawing media and compositional elements while they also learn to see inventively.
This course is a prerequisite for all other courses in studio art unless waived by the instructor.
1 credit.
Each semester. Staff.

STUA 001B. First-Year Seminar: Drawing to Design

This studio art experience is designed for first-year students who have demonstrated through a portfolio presentation their knowledge of the elements of design, composition, and visual thinking. This course is similar in content to the foundation drawing class STUA 001. However, it will be more in depth, with more emphasis on individually designed studio and research projects. Portfolios of actual or photographed work must be submitted for evaluation during orientation week. This portfolio should include, in addition to whatever medium you choose to present, several drawing examples demonstrating proficiency in drawing. Contact the department for details.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Grider.

STUA 005. Color Photography

This class is an introduction to the art and craft of color photography using the tools that are most widely practiced by artists today. Students work toward a final project using either a film or digital camera, processing images in Photoshop and outputting them on a professional-grade ink-jet printer. Weekly critiques, photographer research projects, and at least one field trip to look at art make up the class. It is preferred, but not required, that students take STUA 006: Beginning Photography first.
Prerequisite: STUA 001 or consent of instructor.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Tarver.

STUA 006. Beginning Photography

This class introduces students to the traditional craft of silver wet dark-room photography. Though black-and-white images can be created digitally, enough visual and technical complexity remains in silver gelatin printing that many artists continue to work in this time-honored medium long after the “digital revolution.” Students use film cameras, film, and light-sensitive paper to create a final body of work. Weekly critiques, photographer research projects, and at least one field trip to look at art make up the class.
Prerequisite: STUA 001 or consent of instructor.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Tarver.

STUA 007. Book Arts

Introduction to the art of the book. Included will be an investigation into typesetting and printing, binding, wood engraving, and alternative forms of book construction and design.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Phelan.

STUA 008. Oil Painting

Students will investigate the pictorial structure of oil painting and the complex nature of color. A thorough study of texture, spacial conventions, light, and atmosphere will be included.
Prerequisite: STUA 001 or consent of instructor.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Grider.

STUA 009. Life Modeling

Working from the perceptual observation and study of the human body, we will explore the sculptural principles and practice of life modeling in clay. The initial projects are centered on the study of the human figure in parts—the foot, hands, and the individual features of the human face. We will then move on to a portrait head, full figure study, and bas relief.
Note: An ideal semester of the study of the human figure would be to take Life Drawing concurrently with Life Modeling.
Prerequisite: STUA 001 or consent of instructor.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Beckman.

STUA 010. Life Drawing

Work in various media directed toward a clearer perception of the human form. The class is centered on drawing from the model and within this context. The elements of gesture, line, structure, and light are isolated for the purpose of study.
Prerequisite: STUA 001 or consent of instructor.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Grider.

STUA 011. Watercolor

This course is a complete exploration of water-soluble media with an emphasis on transparent, gum arabic-based watercolor. Other materials and techniques will include ink wash, gouache, silk colors, collage, handmade papers, matting, and pen making, using reeds and quills. When in the studio, the class will work from the figure and still life. The central motif, however, will be painting the landscape. Whenever possible, we shall work outdoors. Occasional field trips to locales other than the campus will be offered.
Prerequisite: STUA 001 or consent of instructor.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014.

STUA 012. Figure Painting and Composition

In this advanced course in painting and drawing the human form, emphasis will be given to the methods, thematic concepts, conventions, and techniques associated with multiple figure design and composition.
Prerequisite: STUA 008 and/or STUA 010.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Staff.

STUA 013. Sculpting Everyday Things

Covering a broad range of contemporary sculptural concepts and techniques as they apply to the design and construction of the most common of functional objects—a lamp. Students will design this functional sculpture with the use of found objects as a starting point, in combination with wood and clay. Several other mediums may also be explored, within the design, including, but not limited to—epoxy modeling, plaster casting, fabric work, and assemblage of found materials for surface treatment.
Prerequisite: STUA 001 or consent of instructor.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Meunier.

STUA 014. Landscape Painting

This course explores the vast array of interpretive approaches, and practical methods available to the artist interested in landscape painting. Each student will be introduced to methods and techniques that will be used in the field while painting directly from nature. Topics include atmospheric perspective, linear perspective, viewpoint, compositional structuring through shape and rhythm, and a thorough study of light through changing effects of color and tonality. Excursions into the urban, suburban, and rural landscape of southeastern Pennsylvania will be scheduled weekly. Oil paints will be the central medium of the class.
Prerequisite: STUA 001 or consent of instructor.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Exon.

STUA 015. The Potter’s Wheel

This class focuses on a series of projects for the wheel to assist in developing proficiency, technique and ideas for both functional and sculptural form. Critiques and in class discussion are an important component of this experience. Students will be exposed to traditional and nontraditional solutions to the wheel thrown container through slide lectures, videos and guest artists. For beginners and experienced students.
Prerequisite: STUA 001 or consent of instructor.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Carpenter.

STUA 016. Projects for the Potter’s Wheel

Projects for the Potter’s Wheel is an upper level course for students interested in developing their experience on the potter’s wheel. Projects will challenge the student both technically and conceptually. The objective is to build vision as well as skill through technically specific and theme based projects. The goal is to identify a direction and pursue it as a focused body of work for the entire semester. Gallery visits, slide lectures, a guest artist and demonstrations will supplement this experience.
Prerequisite of one semester of Potter’s Wheel or comparable experience required.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Carpenter.

STUA 017. The Container as Architecture

This class focuses on designing and constructing container-based forms using clay as the primary medium. Using hand-building processes including slab, coil and cast forms students will develop architecturally imagined forms. Thematically conceived projects will allow students to explore problems in three-dimensional design using a broad range of architectural references. The experience will be complimented with slide presentations, demonstrations and guest artists.
Prerequisite: STUA 001 or consent of instructor.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Staff.

STUA 018. Printmaking

This class will focus on intaglio and relief processes, and provide a general overview of tools, techniques, terminology, paper and plate preparation, and safety. Using historical and contemporary examples, students will be introduced to the differing ways printmaking can be employed in the creation of contemporary art. The techniques and functions of seriality and the multiple, including how to properly handle paper and edition a print will also be introduced. The final project of the semester will include an exchange edition. Class time will be divided between work time, demonstrations, digital presentations, and field trips.
Prerequisite: STUA 001 or consent of instructor.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Staff.

STUA 020. Advanced Studies

020A. Ceramics
020B. Drawing
020C. Painting
020D. Photography
020E. Sculpture
020F. Printmaking
020G. Architectural Drawing
020J. Book Arts
These courses are designed to usher the intermediate and advanced student into a more independent, intensive study in one or more of the fields listed earlier. A discussion of formal issues generated at previous levels will continue, with greater critical analysis brought to bear on stylistic and thematic direction. All students are expected to attend, throughout the semester, a given class in their chosen medium and must make sure at the time of registration that the two class sessions will fit into their schedules. In addition to class time, students will meet with the professor for individual conferences and critiques.
This series of courses also serves as the Junior Workshop, a colloquium for junior studio art majors in the spring semester. Students will produce work within the classes offered as Advanced Studies. Regularly scheduled group and individual critiques with other junior majors and a faculty coordinator will occur throughout the semester, culminating in a group exhibition.
Note: Although this course is for full credit, a student may petition the studio faculty for a 0.5-credit semester.
Prerequisites: STUA 001 and at least one previous course in the chosen medium.
1 credit.
Each semester. Staff.

STUA 021. Turning Corners, Drawing Architecture

The Beaux-Arts practice of “analytique”—a drawn, or sketched, tour of a building’s unifying visual elements, proportional relationships, and structural details—will be the primary mode of inquiry in this course. Taking advantage of the great number of the fine examples of historical and contemporary architecture in this region, the class will take a series of field trips to a select group of local monuments to gather visual material. We will continue and build on the student’s competency and understanding of linear perspective and free hand sketching, established in the prerequisite, while introducing new methods in site measuring and isometric drawing. Extensive use of watercolor and gouache will also be used, although previous experience in these techniques is not required, in order to articulate the decorative and light specific qualities of each building, and its surroundings.
Prerequisite: STUA 001 or consent from instructor.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Exon.

STUA 022. Color

Color functions in many ways in painting. The interaction of color may be used to create the illusion of light and space or to establish an expressive tone. Color can also operate on a symbolic level or be used to create a compositional structure. Using various drawing and painting media students will explore the ways which color can be manipulated. Assigned readings, critiques and group discussions will be included.
Prerequisite: STUA 001 or consent of instructor.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Grider.

STUA 024. Painting Materials and Methods

This course is designed to give a broad practical introduction to various painting media, tools, and techniques. An abbreviated history of each medium, significant changes to the process and practice, as well as specific tools and applicable techniques will be covered. The course will cover egg tempera, encaustic, distemper, oil, watercolor, gouache, and acrylic, from the raw materials to the final usable medium. Each medium will be addressed through an assigned project. Readings, critiques and group discussions will be included to provide further art historical context and concrete examples of materials issues confronted in class.
1 credit.
Not offered 2013–2014. Grider.

STUA 025. Advanced Studies II

Continuation of STUA 020 on a more advanced level. This series of courses also serves as the Junior Workshop, a colloquium for junior studio art majors in the spring semester. Students will produce work within the classes offered as Advanced Studies. Regularly scheduled group and individual critiques with other junior majors and a faculty coordinator will occur throughout the semester, culminating in a group exhibition.
025A. Ceramics
025B. Drawing
025C. Painting
025D. Photography
025E. Sculpture
025F. Printmaking
025G. Architectural Drawing
025J. Book Arts
Prerequisite: STUA 020.
1 credit.
Each semester. Staff.

STUA 029. Junior Workshop             

During the spring semester of the junior year and in preparation for the Senior Workshop I and II, studio art majors are required to take Junior Workshop as their advanced study. Non-majoring advanced study students are also class participants. Working with a faculty coordinator, students will develop works with an emphasis on improving technically, conceptually and productively. Guest artists, studio visits and critiques will be integral to the workshop experience. Finally, works produced during the workshop will be exhibited in a group exhibition at the end of the semester. Because this required workshop takes place in the spring, it is recommended that off-campus study occur during the fall semester.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Meunier.

STUA 030. Senior Workshop I

This course is designed to strengthen critical, theoretical, and practical skills on an advanced level. Critiques by the resident faculty members and visiting artists as well as group critiques with all members of the workshop will guide and assess the development of the students’ individual directed practice in a chosen field. Assigned readings and scheduled discussions will initiate the writing of the thesis for the senior exhibition.
This course is required of senior art majors.
1 credit.
Fall 2013. Carpenter.

STUA 040. Senior Workshop II

This course is designed to further strengthen critical, theoretical, and practical skills on a more advanced level. During the spring semester of the senior art major, students will write their senior artist statement and mount an exhibition in the List Gallery of the Eugene M. and Theresa Lang Performing Arts Center. The artist statement is a discussion of the development of the work to be exhibited. The exhibition represents the comprehensive examination for the studio art major. Gallery exhibitions are reserved for studio art majors who have passed the senior workshop and fulfilled all requirements, including the writing of the senior art major statement.
1 credit.
Spring 2014. Carpenter.