Genevieve Ching-wen Lee '96 Memorial Lecture

Professors Jeanne Marecek, Moon-Ho Jung, and Lillian Li
Prof. Jeanne Marecek and Lillian Li with guest lecturer, Moon-Ho Jung at the 2007 Lee Memorial Lecture.

The Genevieve Ching-wen Lee '96 Memorial Fund was established in 1995, to support the development of multi-disciplinary Asian American studies. One of the benefits of the Fund is an annual lecture, by distinguished scholars in the field.

2012: Helen Gym

Beyond Black, White and Polka Dot: Asian America and the Struggle for Justice
Community activitist, Asian Americans United, in Philadelphia's Chinatown

 

2011: Sucheta Mazumdar, Historian, Duke University

A History of One's Own: Asian America in the Global Age.
Author of Sugar and Society in China: Peasants, Technology, and the World Market.

2010: Elaine Kim, Professor of Asian American Studies, University of California, Berkeley

Slaying the Dragon Reloaded: Asian American Women and Visual Media Today.

2009: Jean Pfaelzer, Professor of American Studies and East Asian Studies, University of Delaware

Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans

2008: Lok Siu, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Asian/Pacific/American Studies, New York University

Hemispheric Asian America: Rethinking Migration, Sociality, and Racialization

2007: Mooh Ho Jung, Historian, University of Washington

Racial Divisions, Common Struggles: Asian & African Americans in the Age of Emancipation. Author of Coolies and Cane: Race, Labor, and Sugar in the Age of Emancipation.

2005: Rinku Sen, Publisher of ColorLines magazine and Communications Director of the Applied Research Center (ARC)

The In Between World of Asian Americans: Finding Our Place in America's Racial Hierarchy presented by Rinku Sen, Publisher of ColorLines magazine and Communications Director of the Applied Research Center (ARC).

2004: K. Scott Wong, Associate Professor of History and Chair of American Studies, Williams College

The Good Asian in the Good War, presented by K. Scott Wong, associate professor of history and chair of American studies at Williams College. Examples of how the status of Chinese Americans improved during the war, including an analysis of various ways in which Chinese were valorized in the mainstream American and Chinese-American press, the impact of Madame Chiang Kai-shek's visit in 1943, and legislation ending the United States' exclusion policy.

2003: Philip A. Kuhn, Francis Lee Higginson Professor of History and East Asian Languages, Harvard University

Presented by Philip A. Kuhn, Francis Lee Higginson Professor of History and East Asian Languages, Harvard University. Professor Kuhn spoke on How the Chinese Family Made History: Four Centuries of Emigration.

2002: Professor Frank H. Wu, Howard University School of Law

Professor Frank H. Wu, the first Asian American to serve as a law professor at Howard University School of Law. His book, Yellow: Race in America Beyond Black and White, focuses on how changing ideas of racial identity affect race relations in the new century and also addresses contemporary issues such as discrimination, immigration, diversity, globalization, and the mixed-race movement.

2001: Nayan Bhupendra Shah'88, Associate Professor of History, University of California, San Diego

A graduate of Swarthmore, his studies evolved from South Asian history to Asian communities in the United States. His talk focussed on the issues raised in his forthcoming book, Contagious Divides: Epidemics and Race in San Francisco's Chinatown, 1875-1939 (2001).

2000: Pratibha Parmar, Documentary Filmmaker, Activist and Writer

A panel featuring prominent young scholars who all studied with Sau-ling Wong at UC Berkeley: Mark Chiang, University of Pennsylvania, Department of English and Asian American Studies; Daniel Kim, Brown University, Department of English; and Gloria Chun, Bard College, Director of the Multi-Ethnic Studies Program.

1999: Yen-le Espiritu, Professor of Ethnic Studies, University of California, San Diego

Former president of the Association of Asian American Studies, Professor Espiritu is a much respected sociologist and prolific author. Her publications include: Asian American panethnicity: bridging institutions and identities (1992); Filipino American Lives (1995); Asian American women and men: labor, laws and love (1997).

1998: Cynthia Sau-ling Wong, Professor of Asian American Studies and Comparative Ethnic Studies, University of California, Berkeley

Author of Reading Asian American Literature: From Necessity to Extravagance (1993), Professor Wong spoke here on "But What on Earth is an Asian American? - Culture, Class, and Invented Traditions in Gish Jen's Mona in the Promised Land."

1998: Roundtable: Asian American Studies: New Directions, New Debates

A panel featuring prominent young scholars who all studied with Sau-ling Wong at UC Berkeley: Mark Chiang, University of Pennsylvania, Department of English and Asian American Studies; Daniel Kim, Brown University, Department of English; and Gloria Chun, Bard College, Director of the Multi-Ethnic Studies Program.

1997: Sucheng Chan '63, Professor of Asian American Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

Swarthmore student, Sucheng Chan, went on to help create the field of Asian American Studies, as well as one of the first academic departments in North America dedicated to the field. An extremely prolific scholar, she is the author or editor of nine books, and author of dozens of articles on the social history of Asian diaspora communities in California.

1996: L. Ling-chi Wang, Professor of Ethnic Studies, University of California, Berkeley

A pioneer in Asian-American studies and a life-long activist, Professor Wang inaugerated the Lee Lecture series with a talk on "Overrepresentation and Underreprestantaion: Issues and Concerns of Asian Americans in Higher Education," on April 22, 1996.