SWARTHMORE COLLEGE
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY

 

HISTORY 3A: MODERN EUROPE, 1789-1918

THE AGE OF REVOLUTION AND COUNTERREVOLUTION

 

FALL 2010

 

Bob Weinberg                                                            Office Hours: Mondays: 1-3

Trotter 218                                                                                         Wednesdays: 1-3

Telephone: 8133                                                                                 By Appointment

rweinbe1@swarthmore.edu

 

This course introduces you to the impact of the French Revolution on European politics, society, and culture from the late eighteenth century to the aftermath of World War I and the Russian Revolution.  Topics include the revolutionary tradition; industrialization and its social consequences; the emergence of liberalism, feminism, socialism, and conservatism as social and political movements; nationalism and state building, imperialism, the rise of mass society; and world war.  I make no attempt to narrate the entire history of the period.  Instead I will focus on a variety of themes and problems in order to illustrate certain key features of European history since 1789.  The course also introduces you to history as an academic discipline and exposes you to the various ways practitioners of history write about and interpret the past.

 

I mix lectures and discussions, and it is imperative that you keep up with the assigned readings so you can participate actively in class.

 

All articles and documents are available on Blackboard.  In addition, the following books are on reserve in McCabe and available for purchase:

 

Gay Gullickson, Unruly Women of Paris: Images of the Commune

Alistair Horne, The Age of Napoleon

Adam Hochschild, King Leopold’s Ghost

Joan Neuberger and Robin Winks, Europe and the Making of Modernity, 1815-1914

Mark Steinberg, Voices of Revolution

 

Course Requirements:

 

Attendance and active participation in class discussions (10%)

Two five-page papers (20% each)

One five-page book review (20%)

Final examination (20 %)

Surprise quizzes (10%)

 

Five-page papers due:

 

September 28

November 4

 

Book review due:

 

December 6

 

All students are expected to read the College’s policy on academic honesty and integrity that appears in the Swarthmore College Bulletin.  The work you submit must be your own, and plagiarism will be penalized.  Any work suspected of containing plagiarized material will be subject to prosecution by the College Judiciary Council.  When in doubt, check with me.

 

In addition, I will not accept late papers and will assign a failing grade for the assignment unless you notify me and receive permission to submit the paper after the due date.  Class attendance is required, and unexcused absences will result in a lower grade (perhaps failure) in the course.

 

August 30:  What is Europe

 

September 1: Europe in the Eighteenth Century

 

Neuberger and Winks, pp. 1-9

E. P. Thompson, “The Moral Economy of the English Crowd”

 

September 3 The Enlightenment

 

Alan Lightman, “In God’s Place”

 

September 6: 1789, The Year of Revolution

 

Abbe SieyŹs, “What is the Third Estate?”

“Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen”

Malcolm Gladwell, “Historical Outbreaks of Panic Linked to Rye Bread”

Selection from Lynn Hunt, et al, The Making of the West,   (read this selection for an overview of the French Revolution from 1789 to  1799)

 

September 8: The Radicalization of 1789

 

Documents on the Sans-Culottes

 

September 10: The Radicalization of 1789

 

Maximilien Robespierre, “The Republic of Virtue”

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, “The Social Contract”

 

September 13: Women and the Rights of Citizenship

 

Olympe de Gouges, “The Declaration of the Rights of Woman”

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, “Emile”

Documents on Women and Citizenship

 

September 15: Jews and the Rights of Citizenship

 

Documents on the Emancipation of Jews

Robert Darnton, “What was Revolutionary about the French Revolution?”

 

September 17: The Age of Napoleon

 

Alistair Horne, The Age of Napoleon

Neuberger and Winks, pp. 11-40

 

September 20: The Industrial Revolution

 

Neuberger and Winks, pp. 64-92

E. P. Thompson, “Time, Work-Discipline, and Industrial Capitalism”  (recommended)

Samuel Smiles, “Self Help”

Andrew Ure, “Decent Working and Living Conditions”

 

September 22: The Age of Ism--Conservatism and Liberalism

 

Neuberger and Winks, pp. 41-51 and 125-139

Edmund Burke, “Prejudice, Religion, and the Antagonist World”

John Stuart Mill, “On Liberty” and “Of Property”

Konstantin Pobedonostev, “The Falsehood of Democracy”

 

September 24:The Age of Isms--Socialism before Marx and Engels

 

Neuberger and Winks, pp. 93-124 and 139-152

 

FIRST PAPER DUE ON TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 BY 4 PM

 

September 27: The Age of Isms--Marxism

 

Steven Marcus, “Marx’s Masterpiece at 150”

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto

 

September 29: The Age of Isms--Nationalism

 

Neuberger and Winks, pp. 57-63

Giuseppe Mazzini, “Conversion to Nationalism,” “Young Italy,” and “To the Young Men of Italy”

Ernest Renan, “What is a Nation?”

 

October 1: Crisis at Mid-Century--The Revolutions of 1848

 

Neuberger and Winks, pp. 153-182

 

October 4: Russia at Mid-Century

 

October 6: State and Society in the Nineteenth Century

 

Neuberger and Winks, pp. 183-228

 

October 8: Library Tutorial

 

Come to classroom for tutorial by Melanie Maksin, Social Sciences Reference Librarian

 

October 18: The Jewish Question and Antisemitism

 

Wilhelm Marr, “The Victory of Judaism over Germandom”

Edouard-Adolphe Drumont, “Jewish France”

“Protocols of the Elders of  Zion”

 

October 20: Visualizing the Jew in the Nineteenth Century

 

October 22: Women and Revolution--The Paris Commune

 

Gay Gullickson, Unruly Women of Paris: Images of  the Commune

 

October 25: Mass Society and the Challenge to Liberalism

 

Neuberger and Winks, pp. 229-245

Fyodor Dostoevskii, “Notes from the Underground”

 

October 27: The Expansion of Europe

 

Neuberger and Winks, pp. 257-288

Ch’ien Lung, “Letter to George III”

“The Letter of Commissioner Lin to Queen Victoria”

Jules Ferry, “Speech Before the French National Assembly”

Royal Niger Company, “Standard Treaty”

Jawaharlal Nehru, “British Rule in India”

 

October 29: Europe at Its Best

 

Adam Hochschild, King Leopold’s Ghost

FILM: Congo ((90 minutes)

November 1: Solving Social and Political Problems

 

Neuberger and Winks, pp. 289-336

Eduard Bernstein, “Evolutionary Socialism”

Rosa Luxemburg, “Social Reform or Revolution”

 

SECOND PAPER DUE ON THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4 BY 4 PM

 

November 3: The Woman’s Question

 

Emmeline Pankhurst, “Why We Are Militant”

Hubertine Auclert, “La Citoyenne”

Alexandra Kollontai, “Women and the Family in the Communist State”

 

November 5: The Russian Revolutionary Tradition

 

Vladimir Lenin’s Theory of the Party

 

November 8: The Cataclysm of War--Europe Loses Its Innocence

 

Neuberger and Winks, pp. 337-358

Denis Winter, “The Strain of Trench Warfare”

Ernst Junger, “The Storm of Steel”

 

November 10: The Cataclysm of War

 

Overview of World War I

Norman Naimark, “The Armenians and the Greeks of Anatolia”

 

FILM: The Grand Illusion (115 minutes)

 

November 12: The Meaning of War

 

Omer Bartov, “The European Imagination in the Age of Total War”

Discussion of The Grand Illusion

 

November 15: Russia’s First Brush with Revolution

 

Leon Trotsky, “The Peculiarities of Russia’s Development”

 

November 17: The Bolsheviks Come to Power

 

Ronald Suny, “Revising the Old Story”

 

November 19: No Class

 

November 22: The Meaning of Revolution

 

Mark Steinberg, Voices of Revolution, pp. 37-79, 149-182, and 251-273

 

November 24: The Meaning of Revolution

 

Mark Steinberg, Voices of Revolution, pp. 1-35 and Selected Documents

 

November 29: The Fate of the Revolution

 

Emma Goldman, My Disillusionment in Russia

Alexandra Kollontai, “Make Way for Winged Eros”

 

BOOK REVIEW DUE ON MONDAY, DECEMBER 6 BY 4 PM

 

December 1: The Future of Europe

 

Sigmund Freud, “A World Without Peace”

 

December 3: To be Determined

 

FINAL EXAM DUE ON MONDAY, DECEMBER 15 BY 4 PM