SWARTHMORE COLLEGE
HISTORY 3A

 

HISTORY OF MODERN EUROPE, 1789-1918

THE AGE OF REVOLUTION AND COUNTERREVOLUTION

 

Bob Weinberg                                             Office Hours: MW 2-4 and By Appointment

Trotter 218

8133

rweinbe1

 

This course introduces you to the impact of the French Revolution on European politics, society, and culture from 1789 to the end of World War I and the Bolshevik seizure of power in Russia.  Topics include: the revolutionary tradition; industrialization and its social consequence; the emergence of liberalism, feminism, socialism, nationalism and state building; conservatism; the rise of mass society, and world war.  Readings will consist of documents, articles, and monographs.

 

I make no attempt to narrate the history of the period.  Instead I focus on a variety of themes and problems in order to illustrate certain key features of European history since the late eighteenth century.  The course also introduces you to history as an academic discipline and exposes you to to the various ways practitioners of history write about and interpret the past.

 

I mix lectures and discussion, and it is imperative that you keep up with the assigned readings so you can participate actively in class.

 

All students are expected to read the College’s policy on academic honesty and integrity that appears in the Swarthmore College Bulletin.  The work you submit must be your own, and plagiarism will be penalized.  Any work suspected of violating the policy of academic honesty and integrity will be subject to prosecution by the College Judiciary Committee. When in doubt, check with me.

 

In addition, I will not accept late papers and will assign a failing grade for the assignment unless you notify me and receive permission to submit the paper after the due date.  Class attendance is required, and unexcused absences will result in a lower grade (perhaps failure) in the course.

 

All articles and documents are available on Moodle.  In addition, the following books are on reserve in McCabe Library and are available for purchase.

 

Fyodor Dostoevskii, Notes from Underground

Maureen Healy, Vienna and the Fall of the Habsburg Empire: Total War and Everyday Life in World War I 

John Merriman, Massacre: The Life and Death of the Paris Commune of 1871

Mark Steinberg, Voices of Revolution, 1917

Evgenii Zamiatin, We

 

Requirements:

 

Three six-page papers.  I will give you four opportunities during the course of the semester to select which three assignments you want to complete.  Each paper is worth 20 percent of your grade.

 

Final exam, which counts for 30% percent of your grade.

 

Class attendance and participation, which count for 10% of your grade.

 

August 29: Introduction to the Study of History

 

August 31: The Enlightenment

 

Alan Lightman, “The Enlightenment”

Lynn Hunt, ‘The Many Bodies of Marie-Antoinette: Political Pornography and the Problem of the Feminine in the French Revolution”

 

September 2: Europe in the Eighteenth Century—The Ancien Régime

 

E. P. Thompson, “The Moral Economy of the English Crowd”

 

September 5: 1789—The Year of Revolution

 

Abbe SieyŹs, “What is the Third Estate?”

“Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen”

Malcolm Gladwell, “Historical Outbreaks of Panic Linked to Rye Bread”

Text, 750, 752-761

 

September 7: The Revolution Picks Up Speed

 

Documents on the Sans-Culottes

Text, 761-763

 

September 9:  Heads Roll

 

Documents on the Terror

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, “The General Will” 

Lynn Hunt, “The Imagery of Radicalism”

Text, 763-770 and 770-777

 

September 12: Who is a Citizen? Women, Jews, and Colonial Subjects

 

Olympe de Gouges, “The Declaration of the Rights of Woman”

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, “Sophie”

Documents on Women and Citizenship

 

September 14: Who is a Citizen? (continued)

 

Documents on Jews and Citizenship

Documents on Slavery and Citizenship

Text 758 and 777-779

 

September 16: Napoleon and Revolution in Retrospect

 

Robert Darnton, “What was Revolutionary about the French Revolution?”

Text, 780-783 and 787-805

 

September 19: Restoration of the Old Regime

Text, 805-809 and 823-825

 

September 21: The Industrial Revolution

 

Andrew Ure, “Decent Working and Living Conditions”

Friedrich Engels, “Industrial Manchester”

Report on Child Labor

Text, 829-840

 

September 23: The Age of Isms—Conservatism and Liberalism

 

Edmund Burke, “Reflections on the French Revolution”

Joseph De Maistre, “Of the Divine Influence in Political Constitutions”

John Stuart Mill, “On Liberty” and “On Property”

Samuel Smiles, “Self Help”

Text, 853-854

 

September 26: The Age of Isms—Socialism and Marxism

 

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto

Text, 854-857

 

September 28: The Age of Isms—Nationalism

 

Johann Gottlieb Fichte, “Address to the German Nation”

Giuseppe Mazzini, “Conversion to Nationalism,” “Young Italy,” “The Duties of Man,” and “To the Young Men of Italy”

Ernest Renan, “What is a Nation?”

Text, 849-853

 

September 30: Crisis at Mid-Century—1848

 

Text, 858-869

 

FIRST PAPER DUE ON SEPTEMBER 30 BY 5 PM

 

October 3: No Class

 

October 5: Russia in the Mid-Nineteenth Century

 

Terence Emmons, “The Peasants and Emancipation”

 

October 7: Nationalism Turns to the Right—Unification of Germany and Italy

 

Otto von Bismarck, “Iron and Blood”

Text, 873-879 and 881-889

 

October 17: State and Society in the Nineteenth Century

 

Text, 844-849, 891-897 and 911

 

October 19: The Modern State and Mass Society

 

Text, 915-924, 945-954 and 979-980

 

October 21: The Paris Commune

 

John Merriman, Massacre: The Life and Death of the Paris Commune of 1871

Watch for Class The Paris Commune (Access via Tripod: http://fod.infobase.com/PortalPlaylists.aspx?wID=102939&xtid=2466

 

October 24: The Jewish Question

 

Wilhelm Marr, “The Victory of Judaism over Germandom

“Protocols of the Elders of Zion”

Text, 980-985

 

October 26: Learning to Use the Library: Sarah Elichko, Social Sciences Librarian

 

October 28: The Rational Animal?

 

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes from Underground

 

SECOND PAPER DUE ON OCTOBER 26 BY 5 PM

 

October 31: Racism and the Imperial Realm

 

Watch for Class: Namibia: The Genocide of the Second Reich (60 minutes)

http://search.alexanderstreet.com.proxy.swarthmore.edu/view/work/2658154

 

Congo: White King, Red Rubber, Black Death (90 minutes)

http://fod.infobase.com.proxy.swarthmore.edu/p_ViewVideo.aspx?xtid=110337

 

Ch’ien Lung, “Letter to George III”

“The Letter of Commissioner Lin to Queen Victoria”

Jules Ferry, “Speech Before the French National Assembly”

Jawaharlal Nehru “British Rule in India”

Ho-chi Minh  “Declaration of Independence of the Republic of Vietnam”

Text, 847-849, 895-899 and 924-933

 

November 2: The Woman’s Question

 

Emmeline Pankhurst, “Why We Are Militant”

Hubertine Auclert, “La Citoyenne

Alexandra Kollontai, “Women and the Family in the Communist State”

Text, 964-966 and 975-978

 

November 4: What Do We Mean by Modernity?

 

Vanessa Schwartz, “The Morgue and the Musée Grévin: Understanding the Public Taste for Reality in Fin-de-SiŹcle Paris”

Text, 933-942, 959-964, and 965-974

 

November 7: Reform or Revolution?

 

Eduard Bernstein, “Evolutionary Socialism”

Rosa Luxemburg, “Social Reform or Revolution”

Vladimir Lenin, “What is to Be Done?”

Text, 906-911

 

November 9: The War to End All Wars

 

Watch for Class: The Grand Illusion (Two hours)

Text, 985-988, 990-999, and 1003-1014

 

November 11: Revolutionary Stirrings in Russia

 

November 14: The Cataclysm of War

 

Maureen Healy, Vienna and the Fall of the Habsburg Empire: Total War and Everyday Life in World War I 

Denis Winter, “The Strain of Trench Warfare”

Ernst Junger, “Storm of Steel”

 

November 16: The Collapse of Tsardom and the Bolshevik Seizure of Power

 

Sheila Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution (chapters one and two)

Mark Steinberg, Voices of Revolution (Start reading)

 

November 18: No Class

 

THIRD PAPER DUE ON NOVEMBER 18 BY 5 PM

 

November 21: Understanding the Bolshevik Seizure of Power

 

Leon Trotsky, “The Peculiarities of Russia’s Development”

Ronald Suny, “Revising the Old Story”

 

November 23: Picking Up the Pieces

 

Text, 1019-1028

 

November 28: The Meaning of Revolution

 

Mark Steinberg, Voices of Revolution

 

November 30: Reflections on the War

 

Sigmund Freud, “The Disappointments of War”

Peter Holquist, "Information Is the Alpha and Omega of Our Work: Bolshevik Surveillance in Its Pan-European Context

 

December 2: What’s In Store for Us?

 

Evgenii Zamiatin, We

 

FOURTH PAPER DUE ON DECEMBER 7 BY 5 PM

 

FINAL EXAM SET BY REGISTRAR