Students

I have had the oppertunity to collaberate with pehnomenal students and I want to aknowledge the more recent students' input and hard work here. Also this gives me a chance to brag about what my students are doing now.

Malcolm Augat:

MEEVO

Malcolm is a jack-of-all-trades when it comes to beetle research. He has worked on beetle DNA, live beetles, beetle bioinformatics, and now programming code for the beetle robotics project. He is currently a gradaute student at the University of Virginia here in Butch Brodie's laboratory studying the evolution of the G-matrix.

 

 

 

Molly Barnard:

MEEVO

 

 

Molly was on our field crew during the summer of 2008. She conducted an independent project (funded by the Swarthmore Biology department) examining female forked fungus beetle movement and behavioral patterns.

 

 

Eileen Butterfield:

MEEVO

 

 

Eileen was my REU student at MLBS during the summer of 2008. She explored the possibility of forked fungus beetles generating phenotypic covariance at the deme level by altering their temporal activity patterns. Eileen is currently enrolled in the Erasmus Mundus Master Programme in Evolutionary Biology in Europe!

 

 

 


Amy Heilman:

MEEVO

 

 

Amy working in our molecular lab at UVA on beetles from 2008-2009. She has spent countless hours with pipette in hand developing markers for use in parentage analysis. Amy is currently in the Ph.D. program at Duke working on Lemurs!

 

 

 

 

Helen Hougen:

MEEVO

 

Helen became interested in Forked Fungus Beetles when she was a sophomore in my Molecular Ecology Seminar at Swarthmore. In 2009 she came to Mountain Lake and discovered that beetle social networks were a useful way to predict how external mites spread through a population. Just be glad it doesn't work that way through Facebook!

 

 

 

Whitney Larsen:

WBL

 

 

 

Whitney was my REU student at MLBS during the summer of 2009. She wondered if nodal social network metrics correlated with fitness. In other words does an individual's location in a social network matter to natural selection? After recording and watching hundreds of hours of videos she found that that they indeed they do!

 

 

 

David Montgomery:

MEEVO

 

David was our Planet Earth photographer this summer (2009) as he recorded hundreds of hours of beetles doing "it". His study resulting in an in depth description of beetle courtship and suggested that beetles may be altering their courtship dance if other beetles are near-by to eavesdrop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corlett Wood:

WBL

Corlett began working on forked fungus beetles in the fall of 2007 and has had the beetle bug ever since. Corlett has worked on several aspects of beetle biology from DNA to metapopulation dynamics. She was recently awarded the prestigious Jefferson Fellowship as well as the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and is currently a Ph.D. student in Butch Brodie's lab studying selection and population genetics in forked fungus beetles.