Talks



2014-2015

1. Estimating the Duration and Tempo of the Cambrian Explosion, Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2014, Vancouver, October 2014



2013-2014

5. Dating the Demise of the Dinosaurs, Department of Earth and Environment, Franklin and Marshall College, April 2014.

4. Estimating the Number of Pulses in a Mass Extinction, Geobiology Symposium XXII, University of Pennsylvania, Feburary 2014.

3. How We Know What We Don't Know: Using Statistics to Discover the Unknown, Energy Insurance Mutual RIsk Managers Information Meeting, Orlando, February 2014.

2. Visualizing large-scale trends using time-varying change-vs-ancestor plots, Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2013, Denver, October 2013 [abstract].

1. How We Know What We Don't Know: Using Statistics to Discover the Unknown, One Day University, New York City, September 2013.



2012-2013

2. Dating the Demise of the Dinosaurs, Second Tuesday Science Cafe, Swarthmore College, May 2013.

1. Estimating the Number of Pulses in a Mass Extinction, Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2012, Charlotte, November 2012 [abstract].



2011-2012

3. 180 degrees, TEDxSwarthmore, Swarthmore College, March 2012. [video]

2. Within- and among-genus components of size dynamics during mass extinction and recovery, Geobiology Symposium XX, University of Pennsylvania, Feburary 2012.

1. Within- and among-genus components of foraminiferan size dynamics during mass extinction, recovery, and background intervals, Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2011, Minneapolis, October 2011 [abstract].



2010-2011

7. Getting Your Paper Published, Division of Natural Sciences summer lecture series, Swarthmore College, July 2011.

6. Dating the Demise of the Dinosaurs, Department of Mathematics, Bucknell University, March 2011.

5. Highlights from Student Research, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Swarthmore College, January 2011.

4. Dating the Demise of the Dinosaurs, Guest lecture, Geology 203, Department of Geology, Bryn Mawr College, December 2010.

3. Effective PowerPoint Presentations, Beardsley Media Center/ITS, Swarthmore College, November 2010.

2. Principles of Statistical Inference: Likelihood and the Bayesian Paradigm, Paleontological Society Short Course, Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2010, Denver, October 2010.

1. Paleontology, Statistics, Earthquakes, and Why You Should Start Smoking (?), Faculty Lunch series, Swarthmore College, September 2010.



2009-2010

9. Giving a Talk Using PowerPoint, Division of Natural Sciences summer lecture series, Swarthmore College, July 2010.

8. Modeling Food Web Collapse in the end-Permian Mass Extinction, Department of Geology, Field Museum of Natural History, April 2010.

7. Dating the Demise of the Dinosaurs, Claremont Colleges Mathematics Colloquia, hosted by the Department of Mathematics, Harvey Mudd College, February 2010.

6. Dating the Demise of the Dinosaurs, Hadly Lab, Department of Biology, Stanford University, February 2010.

5. Statistical Challenges in Paleontology, Department of Statistics, Stanford University, January 2010.

4. Adjusting Extinction Rates for Taxonomic Susceptibility, Division of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History, December 2009.

3. Adjusting Extinction Rates for Taxonomic Susceptibility, Brown Bag Seminar Series, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, November 2009.

2. Confidence Intervals for the Duration of a Mass Extinction, Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2009, Portland, October 2009 [abstract].

1. Accounting for the Signor-Lipps Effect in Estimating the Duration of a Mass Extinction, Payne Lab, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, September 2009.



2008-2009

5. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Principles and Pitfalls of Displaying Data, Division of Natural Sciences summer lecture series, Swarthmore College, July 2009.

4. Dating the Demise of the Dinosaurs, invited talk, Pi Mu Epsilon induction ceremony, Mathematics and Computer Science Department, St. Joseph's University, May 2009.

3. Accounting for the Signor-Lipps Effect in Estimating the Duration of a Mass Extinction , Geobiology Symposium XVII, Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Feburary 2009.

2. Confidence Intervals on Stratigraphic Ranges When Recovery Potential Is Unknown, Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2008, Houston, October 2008 [abstract].

1. Celebrating the 85th birthday of Herman Chernoff and the 35th birthday of his "The Use of Faces to Represent Points in K-Dimensional Space Graphically", invited talk, Quintessential Contributions: Celebrating Major Birthdays of Statistical Ideas and Their Inventors, Harvard University, September 2008.



2007-2008

10. Visualizing Managerial Strategies in Baseball, Joint Statistical Meetings, Denver, August 2008. [abstract].

9. Bunts, Steals, and Pitchouts: Visualizing Managerial Strategies in Baseball, Ride the Tide to Swarthmore [prospective students' event], April 2008.

8. Visualizing Managerial Strategies in Baseball, guest lecture, Math 3: Introduction to Mathematical Thinking (Prof. Gene Klotz), Swarthmore College, April 2008.

7. Adjusting Extinction Rates for Taxonomic Susceptibility, invited talk, Ecolunch, Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, March 2008.

6. Confidence Intervals on Stratigraphic Ranges when Recovery Potential is Unknown, Geobiology Symposium XVI, University of Pennsylvania, Feburary 2008.

5. Visualizing Managerial Strategies, invited talk, AAAS Annual Meeting, Boston, February 2008. [abstract].
(also see here for media coverage.)

4. What Caused the Permian Extinction? Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo to Investigate the Biggest Mass Extinction Ever, invited talk, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Villanova University, February 2008.

3. Modeling Food Web Collapse in the End-Permian Extinction, guest lecture, Physics 120: Physics of Biological Systems, Swarthmore College, February 2008.

2. Adjusting Extinction Rates for Taxonomic Susceptibility. Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2007, Denver, October 2007 [abstract].

1. Markov Chain Monte Carlo: Taking Advantage of Chance, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Swarthmore College, September 2007.


2006-2007

8. Discovering the Underlying Themes of Statistical Models, Joint Statistical Meetings, Salt Lake City, August 2007. [abstract].

7. Adjusting Extinction Rates for Faunal Susceptibility, invited plenary lecture, CalPaleo 2007, California Academy of Sciences, April 2007.

6. Marov Chain Monte Carlo: Taking Advantage of Chance, invited talk, Center for Philosophy of Biology, Duke University, April 2007.

5. Adjusting Extinction Rates for Taxonomic Susceptibility, Geobiology Symposium XV, Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, February 2007.

4. What is Cope's Rule?, National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, Working group on Phanerozoic body size trends in time and space, February 2007.

3. How Many Kinds of Dinosaurs Were There?, faculty lunch, Swarthmore College, January 2007.

2. Dating the Demise of the Dinosaurs, invited talk, Department of Mathematics, Haverford College, November 2006.

1. Modeling Terrestrial Food Web Collapse in the End-Permian Extinction. Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2006, Philadelphia, October 2006 [abstract].


2005-2006

11. Tree-based and Bayesian Modeling of Food Web Collapse in the Permian Mass Extinction, Joint Statistical Meetings, Seattle, August 2006 [abstract].

10. Dating the Demise of the Dinosaurs, invited talk, Delaware Valley Paleontological Society, Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, May 2006.

9. Modeling Terrestrial Food Web Collapse in the end-Permian Mass Extinction, Geological Society of America North Central Section, University of Akron, April 2006 [abstract].

8. Statistical Challenges in Paleontology, invited talk, American Statistical Association, Philadelphia Chapter, March 2006.

7. Modeling Terrestrial Food Web Collapse in the end-Permian Mass Extinction , guest lecture, Biology 137: Biodiversity, Swarthmore College, March 2006.

6. Modeling Terrestrial Food Web Collapse in the end-Permian Mass Extinction, Geobiology Symposium XIV, University of Pennsylvania, Feburary 2006.

5. Bayesian Modeling of the Duration of a Multi-Stage Mass Extinction Event, Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2005, Salt Lake City, October 2005. [abstract]

4. How Many Kinds of Dinosaurs Were There?, invited talk, Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, October 2005.

3. Statistical Challenges in Paleontology, invited talk, Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University, September 2005.

2. Careers in Statistics at Liberal Arts Colleges, invited talk, Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University, September 2005.

1. Bayesian Modeling of the Duration of a Mass Extinction Event, invited talk, Department of Earth Sciences, Syracuse University, September 2005.


2004-2005

5. Baseball's Highest Honor: Teaching Statistical Principles Using the Baseball Hall of Fame, invited talk, Joint Statistical Meetings, Minneapolis, August 2005.

4. Modeling evolutionary trends: Don't Forget the Variance, North American Paleontological Convention, Dalhousie Unversity, June 2005.

3. Estimating Absolute Diversity: How Many Dinosaur Genera Were There, Geobiology Symposium XIII, University of Pennsylvania, Feburary 2005.

2. Estimating Absolute Diversity: How Many Dinosaur Genera Were There?, Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2004, Denver, November 2004. [abstract]

1. How to (and How Not to) Give a Talk Using Overhead Transparencies, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Swarthmore College, October 2004.


2003-2004

15. Bayesian Models for Mass Extinctions, invited talk, Joint Statistical Meetings, Toronto, August 2004.

14. Statistical Challenges in the Analysis of Mass Extinctions, invited poster, Joint Statistical Meetings, Toronto, August 2004.

13. Save the Equation for Last, roundtable lunch, Joint Statistical Meetings, Toronto, August 2004.

12. Using Props to Teach Statistics, Fourth Annual Science and Math Pedagogy Retreat, Bryn Mawr College, May 2004.

11. Statistical Challenges in the Analysis of Mass Extinctions, New England Statistical Symposium, Harvard University, April 2004. [abstract]

10. Classifying Large-Scale Trends: Beyond Passive and Driven, Invertebrate Paleontology, Harvard University, April 2004.

9. Dating the Demise of the Dinosaurs, Invited talk, Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth Odyssey Series, Swarthmore College, March 2004.

8. Dating the Demise of the Dinosaurs, guest lecture, Biology 38: Paleobiology, Swarthmore College, March 2004.

7. Don't Forget the Variance: Modeling large-scale evolutionary trends, Geobiology Symposium XII, University of Pennsylvania, Feburary 2004.

6. Dating the Demise of the Dinosaurs, Faculty Lunch, Swarthmore College, January 2004.

5. How to (and How Not to) Give a Talk Using Overhead Transparencies, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Swarthmore College, November 2003.

4. On the Continuity of Background and Mass Extinction, Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2003, Seattle, November 2003 [abstract]

3. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Principles and Pitfalls of Displaying Data, Swarthmore College Alumni Association, Chicago, October 2003. [abstract]

2. Teaching Through Questions, invited talk, Teaching Statistics Seminar Series, The University of Chicago, October 2003. [abstract]

1. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Principles and Pitfalls of Displaying Data, invited talk, The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools, October 2003. [abstract]


2002-2003

10. Statistical Models for Mass Extinctions, Joint Statistical Meetings, San Francisco, August 2003.

9. Statistical Models for Mass Extinctions, invited talk, Sixth North American New Researchers Conference, University of Callifornia - Davis, July 2003.

8. Continuity of Background and Mass Extinctions: Blizzard or Hailstorm? , invited colloquium, Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, May 2003. [abstract]

7. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Principles and Pitfalls of Displaying Data, invited talk, Sigma Xi Strawberry Festival, May 2003. [abstract]

6. Save the Equation for Last, Third Annual Science Teaching Symposium, Bryn Mawr College, May 2003. [abstract]

5. Continuity of Background and Mass Extinctions: Blizzard or Hailstorm? , invited colloquium, Department of Geology, Bryn Mawr College, April 2003. [abstract]

4. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Principles and Pitfalls of Displaying Data, Faculty Lunch, Swarthmore College, March 2003. [abstract]

3. Sudden, Gradual, or Stepwise? Expanding the Null Hypothesis in Tests of Mass Extinctions, Geobiology Symposium XI, University of Pennsylvania, Feburary 2003. [abstract]

2. The Analysis of Skewness, invited colloquium, Department of Statistics, Temple University, November 2002

1. Sudden, Gradual, or Stepwise? Expanding the Null Hypothesis in Tests of Mass Extinctions, Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2002, Denver, October 2002 [abstract]


2001-2002

3. The Analysis of Skewness, Joint Statistical Meetings, New York City, August 2002

2. Optimal Methods for Estimating the Position of a Mass Extinction Boundary, Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2001, Boston, Massachusetts, November 2001 [abstract]

1. The Analysis of Skewness, invited colloquium, American Statististical Association, Boston Chapter, November 2001


2000-2001

5. What Are Mass Extinctions? A Statistical Approach using Density Estimation, North American Paleontological Convention 2001, Berkeley, CA, June 2001 [abstract]

4. The Analysis of Skewness, New England Statistical Symposium, University of Connecticut, April 2001

3. Resampling and the Bootstrap in Medical Research, invited colloquium, Brigham and Women's Hospital Biostatistics and Harvard Medical School , Boston, MA, February 2001

2. Quantifying Large-Scale Evolutionary Trends, Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2000 , Reno, Nevada, November 2000 [abstract]

1. Teaching Through Questions, invited colloquium, Harvard University, Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, Fall Teaching Orientation, September 2000


1999-2000

7. Analysis of Skewness for Passive and Driven Evolutionary Trends, International Conference on Statistics in the 21st Century , University of Maine, June 2000

6. A Statistical Model for Computer Handwriting Recognition, New England Statistical Symposium, Brown University, April 2000

5. Managers: A Statistical Picture, Society for American Baseball Research, Boston Regional, April 2000

4. A Statistical Model for Computer Handwriting Recognition, invited colloquium, UMass Amherst, March 2000

3. A Mountain out of a Molehill: Bayes Theorem and the Practice of Statistics, invited colloquium, Amherst College, March 2000

2. Teaching Through Questions, invited colloquium, Harvard University, Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, Winter Teaching Orientation, February 2000

1. A Statistical Model for Computer Handwriting Recognition, invited colloquium, Boston University, December 1999


Return to Steve's home page.