Swarthmore College Peace Collection

Fannie Fern Andrews Collected Papers, 1906-1940, 1997

Collection: CDG-A



Contact Information
Swarthmore College Peace Collection
500 College Avenue
Swarthmore, PA 19081-1399
U.S.A.
Telephone: (610) 328-8557 (Curator)
Fax: (610) 328-8544
Email: wchmiel1@swarthmore.edu (Curator)
URL: http://www.swarthmore.edu/Library/peace/

Descriptive Summary
Repository
The Swarthmore College Peace Collection is not the official repository for this collection of papers.
Creator
Andrews, Fannie Fern Phillips (1867 - 1950)
Title
Fannie Fern Andrews Collected Papers
Inclusive Dates
1906-1940, 1997
Call Number
CDG-A

Language of Materials
Materials in English
Extent
16 linear inches [papers only]
Abstract
Fannie Fern Phillips was in 1867 in Margaretville, Novia Scotia. She graduated from Salem Normal School and taught school in Lynn from 1884 until her marriage to Edwin G. Andrews in July 1890. She earned her BA in 1902 and MA in 1920 from Radcliffe College.

Andrews founded the American School Peace League (which changed its name to the American School Citizenship League in 1919). Pacifist literature and study courses produced by the League, much of it written by Andrews, were circulated widely. School essay contests held by the League high school students all over the country participated. Andrews was the League's Secretary from 1908 until her death. Andrews was a founding member of the Woman's Peace Party, and was one of the delegates to the International Committee of the International Congress of Women at The Hague in 1915. She was appointed by President Roosevelt to serve as a delegate to international conferences on education in 1934 and 1936.



Administrative Information
Restrictions to Access
None
Usage Restrictions
None
Alternate Form of Material
None
Acquisitions Information
Unknown
Processing Information
Processed by Anne Yoder, January 2000. This finding aid was revised by Andrew Ciampa, June 11, 2010.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Fannie Fern Andrews Collected Papers (CDG-A), Swarthmore College Peace Collection
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendents, as stipulated by United States copyright law

Online Catalog Headings
These and related materials may be found under the following headings in online library/archival catalogs.
See tripod record


Related Collections
American School Citizenship League Collected Records [includes the American School Peace League] (CDG-A)
Mary Chase Collected Papers (CDG-A)
Emily Greene Balch Papers (DG 006)
Woman's Peace Party Records (DG 043)
Central Organization for a Durable Peace Records (DG 007)
Universal Peace Union Records (DG 038)
American Peace Society Records (DG 003)
Rose Dabney Forbes Papers (DG 014)
Massachusetts Peace Society Records (DG 020)
National League of Women Voters Collected Records (CDG-A)
William Hull Papers (RG 5/069, Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College)
Fannie Fern Andrews Papers (Schlesinger Library, Harvard)


Historical Background
Fannie Fern Phillips was born on September 25, 1867 in Margaretville, Novia Scotia, and later lived in Lynn, Massachusetts. She graduated from Salem Normal School (now Salem State College) in Lynn in 1884, and taught school in Lynn from 1884 until her marriage to Edwin G. Andrews in July 1890. In 1895 and 1896 she attended summer school at Harvard, and earned her BA in 1902 and MA in 1920 from Radcliffe College.

Andrews was deeply interested in education and reform, and in 1905 she formed one of the earliest school-affiliated parents' organizations. In 1907 she founded the Boston Home and School Association, of which she served as Secretary and later President until its closing in 1918.

Prior to World War I, the peace movement actively promoted the role of education in building peace. Andrews, who had been recruited into the movement in 1905 by Lucia Ames Mead, conceived the idea of organizing schoolteachers, and in 1908 founded the American School Peace League (which changed its name to the American School Citizenship League in 1919). She promoted the League to such an extent that support grew rapidly throughout the country. Pacifist literature and study courses produced by the League, much of it written by Andrews, were circulated widely and in 1912 began to be distributed by the U.S. Bureau of Education, with which she was associated until 1921 as a special collaborator. The school essay contests held by the League high school students all over the country participated. Andrews was the League's Secretary from 1908 until her death.

On a trip to Europe in 1910, Andrews promoted the establishment of the School Peace League in Great Britain and Ireland. She was the prime mover for holding the first intergovernmental conference on education (which was to convene at The Hague in Sept. 1914, but could not take place because of the outbreak of war), and for the establishment of the International Bureau of Education.

In 1915, as a founding member of the Woman's Peace Party, Andrews served with Jane Addams as an American member of the International Committee of the International Congress of Women at The Hague and subsequently on the International Committee of Women for Permanent Peace. Andrews also worked for the establishment of the League of Nations as international corresponding secretary of the Central Organisation for a Durable Peace and as a member of the League to Enforce Peace. In 1919, she represented the U.S. Bureau of Education at the Paris Peace Conference. She was appointed by President Roosevelt to serve as a delegate to international conferences on education in 1934 and 1936.

Andrews made substantial scholarly contributions to the study of international relations in her 1917 monograph Freedom of the Seas: The Immunity of Private Property at Sea in Time of War, her 1923 doctoral thesis on the legal aspects of the mandatory system (for which she was awarded a Ph.D. by Radcliffe College), and her 1931 well-received two-volume The Holy Land Under Mandate, based on extensive field research. The latter was widely regarded as the first comprehensive and impartial view of the problems facing the Arabs, Jews and Christians in Palestine under the British Mandate.

Andrews was active in the American Association of University Women, chairing its international relations committee from 1925 to 1932. Her Memory Pages of My Life was published in 1948. She died in Somerville, Massachusetts on January 23, 1950.

The bulk of Andrews' papers are at the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College.

[Sources: Biographical Dictionary of Internationalists; web page of Encyclopedia Britannica Inc.]

 




Detailed Description of the Collection

Box 1
Biographical information
Correspondence, 1915 - 1938
Discussion of plans for a Peace Settlement Congress, 1917?
Published writings, 1906 - 1909, 1912 - 1936, undated
Miscellaneous articles/reports
Reviews of Andrews' book The Holy Land Under Mandate, 1931 - 1932
Miscellaneous; reference material
List of Andrews' papers at Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College

Boxes 2-4
Index card file of peace books/literature [once owned by Andrews or by the American School Citizenship League?]



This file was last updated on July 25, 2012.